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Evolution of Walnut & Pine television stand #2: Phase 2

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Blog entry by TZH posted 844 days ago 1589 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Beginning the slabbing process Part 2 of Evolution of Walnut & Pine television stand series no next part

I’d like to thank you, junipercanyon , for your advice on chain sharpening for ripping. Man, what a difference. I figured since you advised somewhere between 0 and 10 degrees I’d split the difference and go with 5 degrees. Slabbed all three in less time than it took me to do the first cut in Phase 1 of this project. This is some really fantastic wood I’m working with, and I can only hope to be able to score more of it in the future.

Step 1: Scribe the lines:

I used a laser line from a cheapo level I bought at Home Depot a long time ago. You can’t really see the red laser line in the photo, but it’s there.




With all the lines scribed (I used a magic marker to be able to see the lines better – I may use my grinder with the chainsaw wheel to make a “guide” cut next time), next I had to figure out how to get this thing set up securely. Used a dolly to transport (weighs in over 200 lbs, and I ain’t a gonna even try lifting it), and got it upright on a pallet:

Once I got it on the pallet, I decided for the first two cuts, I’d use a ratchet tie-down to hold it secure:



Now I was ready to rock and roll. First cut:

Second cut:

Some really nice grain:

The next step was trying to figure out how I’d secure the piece in order to make the last cut. It was too narrow to keep on using the tie-down, so I shimmied the thing around and hammered some impromptu chucks down on the flat sides of the piece to hold it steady:

Worked really well. The piece didn’t move at all, thank goodness. I’d have a lot of explaining to do to my wife if I had had another accident with the chainsaw (put a 61 stitch cut across my left knee a few years back – no sympathy for stupidity, though, cuz it was my own dang fault).
The results of the last cut:


Again, some really nice grain. I’m amazed at the variations. Beautiful wood, that’s for sure. Finally, I stickered them inside my shop just in case there might still be a little moisture I need to let dry out.

Next phase – routing them down with my router planer. Very satisfied so far. Just need to get a little more practice with slabbing. Am thinking about a little bit longer chainsaw bar as my 20” doesn’t go all the way through on some of these types of logs, and my 32” bout’ kills me whenever I use it.

Sorry it took longer than I thought it would to do phase 2. Phase 1 kicked my butt so hard, I had to let these old bones heal up a little before goin’ at it again.

Thanks for looking.
TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685



15 comments so far

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2104 posts in 1110 days


#1 posted 844 days ago

I’ll bet the “thud” of those slabs hitting the ground is a very satisfying sound.

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6912 posts in 1928 days


#2 posted 844 days ago

well im sure glad them old bones got to movin again, and i fully understand , ill tell you that…...but i love your work, you have the same taste in wood work as i do, and your might good with that chain saw, nice slabs there, that has some beautiful figure to it, walnut is my favorite…ive got a few large boards of it, maybe 14 inches wide and 13 feet long, it has some fantastic figure to it and im trying to decide what to make with it…well i cant wait for the next installment here….dont over do…its not going anywhere…oh and the chainsaw across the knee, really makes me cringe…....really…....grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View redryder's profile

redryder

2134 posts in 1726 days


#3 posted 843 days ago

Great looking wood. I never would have thought of standing it up and securing it to the pallet like that. I usually have laid them down and tried to not let the chain saw wander. Looking forward to see what you make…................

-- mike...............

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1494 posts in 897 days


#4 posted 843 days ago

TZH,

Harvesting what Mother Nature has nurtured for decades is a lofty responsability and you’ve done Her proud.

I learned several new lessons in hand cutting slabs from your post; – Sharpening your chain to do Rip cuts (from another fellow LJ, junipercanyon), the Laser to mark the cut lines (I have that same level, used it for hanging shelves, cabinets and pictures), Vertical cuts on a sacrifical pallet, and your idea of Strap Clamp hold downs is brilliant.

These tips will help minimize the waste in squaring up the slabs in the future, I hate unnecessary waste, I guess that’s why we all save every cut off.

Thanks for sharing those “A-ha” (for me) moments. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View junipercanyon's profile

junipercanyon

192 posts in 1318 days


#5 posted 841 days ago

Your welcome, I’m glad the chain sharpening tip helped out. If you are going to make a habit of cutting slabs, it may be worth it to you to buy an alaskan mill attachment for your saw. I just checked the website where I got mine and I see they are on sale right now. http://www.baileysonline.com/search.asp?PageNo=1&skw=alaskan (I bought the one that can attach up to a 36” bar, right now it is on my 32” bar with my Stihl 066 big bore powerhead).
Setting up for the first cut is the only challenging part for using one, but with a little thought and practice in the set up it is pretty easy and fun to do.

Here are a couple of pics of mine in action this past weekend. These trees are dieing all over my town, some bug getting them all. Its pretty sad because they are really neat trees for this area. Fortunately I got to this one before the owner cut it up into firewood and am getting nice 10’ long slabs out of it.

-- Juniper Canyon Design

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1494 posts in 897 days


#6 posted 841 days ago

Juniper,

I like that alaskan mill attachment, had not seen it before. I will be checking out that site while my sons are still young enough to accommodate my needs. :-)

Thanks for sharing. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View TZH's profile

TZH

421 posts in 1765 days


#7 posted 841 days ago

Yeah, I’ve wanted one for a long time, but finances ain’t what they need to be right now, so guess I’ll keep on doin’ it the hard way for awhile.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View junipercanyon's profile

junipercanyon

192 posts in 1318 days


#8 posted 841 days ago

I made a deal with myself to buy mine….., I had to sell wood working projects, to buy new tools, to make better wood working projects, to sell for more money, to buy more tools. What a viscous cycle of pleasurable satisfaction I have gotten myself into,.... and every project gets easier with each tool purchase, (and I don’t drain my bank account doing it!!) So far, its worked out great, and rather than looking at my sales as cash profits, I see them as new tools!!!

-- Juniper Canyon Design

View TZH's profile

TZH

421 posts in 1765 days


#9 posted 841 days ago

JC – that’s the plan – just need to figure out how to market a little bit better. Got most of the tools I need right now, but the mill ain’t one of em. Won’t do anything on credit, will only do cash or barter. Got one piece in the works right now – it’ll give me some breathing room if it goes through.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View RockyBlue's profile

RockyBlue

270 posts in 1318 days


#10 posted 840 days ago

I too am in the tool upgrade cycle. Its a great way to build arsenal of quality machines. Can you talk more about the angle on the chainsaw tooth? Are you talking about the top plate filing angle, or the top plate cutting angle?

-- I haven't had this much fun since hogs ate my little brother. www.rockybluewoodworks.com

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6912 posts in 1928 days


#11 posted 840 days ago

well that just made me make a decision, ill go out and buy new chains…lol

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View TZH's profile

TZH

421 posts in 1765 days


#12 posted 840 days ago

Dang! I just knew someone would come along and confobsticate me on a question like this. I think it best if you were to ask Juniper Canyon on this one. I used my handy-dandy little Harbor Freight chainsaw sharpener:

The image is of a newer model than I have (they’ve definitely made some improvements). At $32, this is a pretty good investment, in my opinion.

I just set the angle of the chain at 5 degrees both ways and let the sharpener do the work.

Don’t know if that helps, but maybe Juniper Canyon will jump in here.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View RockyBlue's profile

RockyBlue

270 posts in 1318 days


#13 posted 839 days ago

I’ve got that same older style sharpener and I love it! Much better than the 12volt one with the round stone. Mine was free, so better yet! I screwed mine to a short 2×4 and I hold it in the vise when using it.

-- I haven't had this much fun since hogs ate my little brother. www.rockybluewoodworks.com

View junipercanyon's profile

junipercanyon

192 posts in 1318 days


#14 posted 834 days ago

I currently sharpen about 0deg both on the filing and cutting angle. I’m slowly experimenting with more angle for speed, but you sacrifice smoothness the farther from 0 you go, (and it puts more load on the saw so if you have a small chainsaw it can actually take longer because it will keep stalling the chain). At 0, the chips come off looking like sawdust rather than wood chips, and if it has a good uniform edge on the teeth it will pull through the log very smooth, almost bandsaw quality.

This site has some pretty good for some information that I pulled from when I first started. http://www.sawmillchainsaws.com/sawchains.htm
and
http://www.procutportablesawmills.com/

-- Juniper Canyon Design

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

1983 posts in 1811 days


#15 posted 702 days ago

I,ve got a Corley mill that I will sell cheep. cuts 42” logs. Alabama

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

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