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Evolution of Walnut & Pine television stand #1: Beginning the slabbing process

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Blog entry by TZH posted 04-13-2012 12:35 AM 3925 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Evolution of Walnut & Pine television stand series Part 2: Phase 2 »

Because our daughter’s tv stand/entertainment center was such a hit with her and just about everyone else who’s seen it we thought it might be time to do one for us, too. I do these things really, really slow because I’m old, don’t ya know. So step one was working up the energy to actually photograph the walnut log prior to marking it for slabbing:


Can’t really see the lines I scribed on the log using a laser line to guide the cut, but they’re there in the second photo. The log is about 48” long and varies in diameter from 14” to maybe 30” at the widest point.

Fired up the old Stihl 440 Magnum with a 20” bar and got to work cutting the first slab off:


Gonna need to learn how to do this better. Cut was just ok, not great. You can see where I missed the mark a coupla times, but will use the router planer later to take it down to flat. Gave the 440 a workout, too – guess I’ll need to sharpen the chain after each cut because it was pretty dull by the time I got done with this one.

Heartwood felt a little damp to the touch (even though these logs have been on the ground for 3-4 years and I’ve had them for almost a year) after slabbing it, so suggestions on how to keep it from warping as it dries would be appreciated.

Cutting one slab was enough of a workout for this day. Hopefully will be able to get to the second one tomorrow. Goal is to get three nice 1 1/2” to 2” slabs from each of the two logs I have.

Thanks for looking.
TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685



7 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6996 posts in 1954 days


#1 posted 04-13-2012 12:46 AM

ok you opened the door, so how old is old….and it looks like a mighty fine slabbing job, no rush on these things, go slow, enjoy, will enjoy seeing this come to fruition, good luck, and yea, sharpen that chain, but …slowly…lol…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View TZH's profile

TZH

424 posts in 1791 days


#2 posted 04-13-2012 01:00 AM

Hey, grizzman – like I tell all my very, very young fans who I tease all the time, I’m as old as my little finger (almost 63 and old enough to know slow is the ONLY way to go, especially when it comes to chainsawing) :-))))) Also use the altitude here as an excuse a LOT – takes my breath away (8400’ both ways – up and down) LoL.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6996 posts in 1954 days


#3 posted 04-13-2012 01:26 AM

yep im creeping that way…you got a few on me…but ive had back probs for a good while, it makes ya feel older, but i just go slow and things get done,,,,its nice to have a fan club…i should try one, do they pay and club fees…lol…..or maybe bring the old guy some cookies…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View TZH's profile

TZH

424 posts in 1791 days


#4 posted 04-13-2012 01:54 AM

Nah, no cookies – the other way around, actually. I do make sure I get em’ some lollipops every time I go to tha bank. They’re 7 and 5 years old (kids of some really good friends). They’re always askin’ what’s in the cookie jar, and we almost always have those lollipops ready. :-)))))

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View junipercanyon's profile

junipercanyon

192 posts in 1344 days


#5 posted 04-13-2012 03:01 PM

Not only is having a sharp chain when slabbing important, but the way you sharpen it is just as critical for a nice cut. Your standard chain teeth are designed for crosscutting and are filed back at an angle of about 30degrees or so. You can easily modify it for a ripping cut by filing them almost straight across, somewhere between 0 and 10degrees. I have mine at 0, and the cut is very smooth, almost as smooth as cutting on a band saw. Its less work on your chainsaw and more controllable because the cutting isn’t so aggressive. The saw should feel like its pulling itself through the cut, and if it feels like your having to do the work by pushing the saw, file down a couple of strokes on the rakers. When you get it right, the saw will actually want to cut faster than you do and you have to hold it back just a little. I slab out junipers which are very hard on chains, and I usually give my chain teeth a 2 or 3 file stroke tune up with every other fuel up.

-- Juniper Canyon Design

View TZH's profile

TZH

424 posts in 1791 days


#6 posted 04-13-2012 03:17 PM

THAT is a very welcome tutorial on sharpening. I hadn’t even thought about the angle – was just doing the standard 30 degree file. I’ll definitely give it a try. Thanks for the tips.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View stefang's profile

stefang

13017 posts in 1985 days


#7 posted 04-13-2012 04:10 PM

Nice chainsaw work. I wish I were 63 again.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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