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Evolution of my router planer #2: Version 1.1

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Blog entry by TZH posted 1408 days ago 2095 reads 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: First Version: 1.0 Part 2 of Evolution of my router planer series Part 3: Version 1.2 »

The next design I came up with for my router planer was based loosely on some of the designs some fellow woodworkers had posted right here on Lumberjocks. The biggest design change was that I eliminated the sled pictured in the first photo in my last blog entry and used angle iron glides instead.

Now here was a design I really took a liking to right away. This one allowed me to plane much larger pieces without fear of slipping off the edges of the runners because the router moves within the confines of the angle iron glides.

The angle iron glides also allowed the router to slide back and forth (gotta use beeswax on a regular basis to grease the skids, so to speak) and the edges of the iron glides also keep it straighter and truer when planing. The sled was made just wide enough to accommodate the width of the router baseplate, so there is virtually no chance the router will slip out when planing.

However, this process is time consuming and hard on the back if the piece is very large or the angle makes for a long reach. To address this issue, I found working on half the piece at a time, and then switching to the other half when done with the first half, works very well (see photo below). I also found that a larger router works a lot better than the smaller ones (a 1/2” shank router straight bit that cuts a larger diameter is definitely a plus, too). Anyway, this improved design router planer was a lot closer to what I needed than anything I’d found so far.

The photo above shows just one example of a large slab being planed. This piece is almost 3’ at its widest point. It started out over 5” thick and the “wings” on it were so warped, I wasn’t sure I was going to be able to save it. The photo below shows this slab as a coffee table top that I’ve gotten a lot of drooling over, but so far I haven’t had a buyer for it.

Next up – Version 1.2.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685



8 comments so far

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1162 posts in 1491 days


#1 posted 1408 days ago

Drool…

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View KayBee's profile

KayBee

1002 posts in 1878 days


#2 posted 1407 days ago

Nice. I’ve seen these before, but have never seen anyone use angle iron. Great idea, that!

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2308 days


#3 posted 1407 days ago

Good strudy design. Do you have any trouble with the rough angle iron wearing your router base?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TZH's profile

TZH

421 posts in 1772 days


#4 posted 1407 days ago

TopamaxSurvivor: I did notice some wear after a lot of use. My solution was twofold. First, beeswax, beeswax, and more beeswax. But, even with a good coating of beeswax, the base still showed wear. So, I decided to switch the base with a piece of plexiglass cut in a rectangle just wide enough for the sled runners. This way, if I need the router for something else, the base will still be in good condition, and the plexiglass actually helps stabilize the router when in use. It also gives me a better view of the workpiece as I’m taking down the stock. Hope that answers your question.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2320 days


#5 posted 1150 days ago

Do you still use the beeswax with the plexi base ? I can’t find a cheap source for beeswax around here .
I like the angle iron guides.
Is it any special “grade” or thickness of steel ? I was wondering about flexing issues if any.
thanks : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2308 days


#6 posted 1150 days ago

Dusty56, try some beekeepers in the fall, you may find dumpsters full of it. It will be a lot cheaper if you are willing to clean it up yourself. Melt on low heat or a double boiler and strain though cheesecloth. The commercial beeswax is more refined than what I ever needed. I just wanted the dead bees and most of the debris out of it.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TZH's profile

TZH

421 posts in 1772 days


#7 posted 1150 days ago

Dusty56: I haven’t had any issues whatsoever with flexing so far. The only advice I would give here is to get angle iron in a thickness you are comfortable with. I was a little reluctant to use 1/2” piping fearing that it might flex (thought 3/4” would be better), but found 1/2” is plenty rigid. Same with the angle iron. I cut up a bed frame thinking bigger is better, but the angle iron I’m using right now (much smaller, but close to the same thickness) is plenty rigid. Unless you plan on leaning on the sled with your body weight, the router is light enough that there should be no flexing at all. Hope that helps.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2320 days


#8 posted 1150 days ago

TPS , thanks for the beeswax tip ….I can handle the straining part of it…no problem : )

TZH , I’ll check out my local hardware stores to see if they stock different grades of AI , and go from there. Thanks for all of your experience with this matter : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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