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Safety during a band saw operation

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Blog entry by Surfside posted 09-25-2012 03:37 PM 3825 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A band saw machine is not easy to work with. From a small table top band saw model to a large complex one, just seeing the machine should tell you that one needs proper knowledge on how to operate and to remain safe at the same time.

But, is it just the knowledge to operate the machine that one must have to start using the band saw?

Everyone knows that a band saw can be as dangerous as it really looks. I have always thought that a band saw machine doesn’t want to hurt you, but it will if you are not paying attention. One wrong move might lead to an accident, so operators should give all due diligence to safety during the operations. Below are safety measures that we need to keep in mind during the operation:

It is always needed to wear gloves and safety glasses when handling band saw blades.
An operator needs to keep his hands safely away from a blade which is in motion.
Take note of maximum safe blade operating speeds:

Carbon FlexBack – 10,000 SFPM
Carbon HardBack – 4,000 SFPM Bi-metal – 2,000 SFPM
Carbide Tipped

Metals – 1,200 SFPM

Aluminum or Non-Metals – 4,000 SFPM

Before every operation, make sure that blades are in good condition and are set properly. Also, we need to take a look if the blade is tensioned properly and is installed properly on the guides so that the teeth are leading in the direction of the cut.
Be sure that the material to be cut is clamped in the vice systems properly.
Assure that you do not drop a stationary blade onto the work piece or start a cut on a corner or sharp edge.
You should never re-start or stop a machine with the blade in a cut.

It is very important to follow proper guidelines before starting the operation. Knowledge on proper safety procedures is a must to have in operating a band saw machine. You won’ t lose anything just by being wise enough, not only to protect the production, but also to protect ourselves to the danger that we might face.

_*this is not my blog. This is for info sharing only.
source: http://bandsawblog.com/safety-during-a-band-saw-operation/_

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"



5 comments so far

View junipercanyon's profile

junipercanyon

192 posts in 1379 days


#1 posted 09-25-2012 04:16 PM

Great post for the ever needed reminder of safety, it is all to easy to forget the little things and get hurt. I would argue a point against this though for instructing to wear gloves. It is a bit of a gray area on when and when not to wear them, but I lean twords NOT when working with machinery. It is too easy for an edge of a glove to get snagged and pull your hand into a machine. I think you are much more aware of where your digits are when not wearing them, and can get careless with hand placement when they are covered up with gloves. Just a few months ago, I saw a coworker get the finger edge of his glove snagged when using the drill press and it ripped the tendon out of his finger joint. Just that little extra bit of glove makes your hands bigger than your brain thinks they are and can get you in trouble.

-- Juniper Canyon Design

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3278 posts in 860 days


#2 posted 09-25-2012 04:24 PM

I agree with your point in using or not using gloves while working. I am also not comfortable with gloves covering my hands. I would prefer not using them so I can stay focus to where my hand is working. Needs more attention to keep your hands in safety, though.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View dlmckirdy's profile

dlmckirdy

195 posts in 1820 days


#3 posted 09-25-2012 08:41 PM

This safety guide is for a horizontal metal cutting bandsaw. This type of saw drops down on the material to be cut and uses the weight of the blade carraige to drive the blade into the stock. It is intended to be set up for the cut, turned on, then left alone to complete the cut. It will turn off automatically when the cut is finilshed. This saw is entirely different than a wood cutting vertical bandsaw that is stationary, with the material being hand-fed into the saw blade.

I see that you are advertizing for Sawblade.com. Are you truly a woodworker, or are you just trying to sell a product?

-- Doug, Bakersfield, CA - I measured twice, cut it twice, and it is still too short!

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3278 posts in 860 days


#4 posted 09-25-2012 08:54 PM

Either what type of saw that we use, safety is still the main concern.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View redryder's profile

redryder

2187 posts in 1788 days


#5 posted 09-26-2012 04:34 AM

Everyone knows that a bandsaw can be as dangerous as it really looks.

Well, I’m not sure what prompted this post about bandsaws being so dangerous. Frankly I use either my Rikon bench top or Grizzly 17” bandsaw specifically because they are so much safer than for example the tablesaw in many applications. I don’t see the bandsaw as being any more dangerous than any other tool in the shop if you keep your eyes open and your wits about you.

Be sure that the material to be cut is clamped in the vice systems properly.

I don’t even know what this means.

You should never re-start or stop a machine with the blade in a cut.

Really?? You never stop a bandsaw in order to back the blade out of a cut in certain situations??
I can appreciate some good safety tips from people who know what they are talking about but scare tactics don’t get it.
Maybe I have missed the last few safety committee meetings but I just don’t see this as a value for woodworkers. I had some difficulty finding your bandsaw projects posted or any for that matter…...................

-- mike...............

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