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Small Painter's Cabinet #3: Starting on the Sides

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Blog entry by Stephen Fields posted 06-12-2008 03:31 AM 797 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Planing The Fixed Shelves Part 3 of Small Painter's Cabinet series Part 4: Cutting the sides to proper dimension »

Now that the fixed shelves have been roughly milled, I wanted to start on the sides. For five cabinets, I need 10 sides. The dimensions for the sides are 7 5/8×28 1/2. Since I am trying to use up the stock I have on hand I was able to grab eight pieces that fit these specifications and two that were only 7 1/2 wide. I figure that I will make a custom cabinet for this fifth one that will end up 1/8 shorter than the others.

My jointer is only 8” wide so I had to rip the boards that were wider than that down to 7 15/16. I thought I took a picture of this but apparently I did not.

Here is a picture of the rough wood I was able to scrounge after they had been ripped:

Small Cabinet

These boards and twisted, cupped, etc so I have to joint one edge flat. Rather then spend extra time flattening these boards due to extra length, I cross cut them to one inch over their final length. To do this operation I use my chop saw. Here is a picture of a board right before I trim it down:

Small Cabinet

As you can see with the pictures below, this is not exactly the straightest boards ever made. Luckily the thickness of these sides is only 1/2 inch so I have plenty of extra room to get them flat.

Small Cabinet

Small Cabinet

Once I flatten a side, I set the board aside and place a “J” on the flattened side. I will later place this edge against the fence to flatten one edge. Here is the “J” in chalk:

Small Cabinet

Once all of the sides have one flat side I then adjusted the fence on the jointer and began jointing the edges:

Small Cabinet

This next picture shows how I cat the dadoes in the sides for the fixed shelves milled earlier:

Small Cabinet

I’m not sure if it was the added step of taking pictures or what happened, but I set the table saw up, took this picture and then realized that I had not cut the sides to the final length. I must do that before cutting the dadoes or I will end up with my dadoes in the wrong place. That is where I will pick up the story in the next installment.

-- "Measure Twice, Cut Once" --- If only I could remember this!



6 comments so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3560 days


#1 posted 06-12-2008 04:10 AM

This is fun to follow.

What is in the Kreg box? It says “precision measuring systems”, is it a fence?

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Stephen Fields's profile

Stephen Fields

15 posts in 3104 days


#2 posted 06-12-2008 04:23 AM

Ask and ye shall receive!!

Kreg Measuring System

I am a heavy user of a crosscut sled and wanted to make a v2, well v3 actually, with a fancy stop system.

-- "Measure Twice, Cut Once" --- If only I could remember this!

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3560 days


#3 posted 06-12-2008 05:42 AM

Oh yeah! I was thinking of using a system like that myself. You definitely have to keep all of your fences in line but the quick stop for repetitive cuts would be a great feature to have.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3560 days


#4 posted 06-12-2008 05:44 AM

Something like that would be great if you were doing several repetitive cuts for a small production run of painter’s cabinets or the like:)

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Taigert's profile

Taigert

593 posts in 3301 days


#5 posted 06-12-2008 10:46 AM

Stephen,
I’m sure there are those out there that will disagree with me on this but. I noticed that you were cutting your stock on the chopsaw when as you described “it was twisted and cupped etc”. That is a good way to having a kick back on your chop saw. The proper way to cut unstable wood would be with a band saw or circular saw. Then proceed to the jointer. I’m sure you have done things this way many times and never had a problem.
The only reason I bring this up is the risk of injury and I would hate to think that a greenhorn would follow your steps, and end getting hurt.
Nothing personal, Stephen

-- Taigert - Milan, IN

View Stephen Fields's profile

Stephen Fields

15 posts in 3104 days


#6 posted 06-12-2008 04:40 PM

Ouch! I had not considered kickback on the chop saw. Would this occur on the waste side? I am securely holding own the left side of the board with my left hand. I agree that using the band saw would be a better option though. This is simply a rough cut and a quick pass through the band saw would take no more time than using the chop saw. Good advice.

-- "Measure Twice, Cut Once" --- If only I could remember this!

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