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Stick Building #2: Making a Staked Stool

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 02-28-2016 08:10 AM 1297 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Making a Tapered Reamer Part 2 of Stick Building series no next part

For those so inclined to read an outside blog (and I realize not everyone is), I’ve posted the second installment in my stick building journey.

Thanks for looking!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --



13 comments so far

View Brit's profile

Brit

6728 posts in 2307 days


#1 posted 02-28-2016 08:39 AM

Nice read Smitty. I can’t wait to see what you come up with further down the road.

-- Andy -- "I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free." (Michelangelo)

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1374 posts in 1596 days


#2 posted 02-28-2016 12:27 PM

My Buddy Smitty, First let me Say BEAUTIFULLY constructed and a very well produced blog. That stool is very similar to the “Moravian Stool’, publishes in Poplar Woodworking Magazine, December 2012 issue #201, of which I have built two and working on the third all with different leg lengths., and of which I’m kinda proud. These stools utilize dovetailed battens for additional leg support/ Christopher Schwarz explains nicely how tho layout octagonal patterns for the legs of which yours are not equal sided, but also not round either. I like yours as I need to learn to use the drawknife with much better results. Thanks for your timely post.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@outlook.com

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 742 days


#3 posted 02-28-2016 01:55 PM

Very nice blog and I even want to make such a stool. But I want to ask about this picture.

Is that the standard/best way to make such shims. It seems to me it would be better to rive them. In either case I have been doing it wrong. Thanks for the lesson.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View terryR's profile

terryR

6320 posts in 1773 days


#4 posted 02-28-2016 02:54 PM

Looks great, and a fine blog, Smitty.

As much as I enjoy the lathe, I look forward to a shave horse one-o-these days. Thanks for the lessons!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13733 posts in 2083 days


#5 posted 02-28-2016 02:54 PM

Don, the shims are not rived, something I’d not read as a goal but I’ll take your word for it, but they are are long grain and hardwood (mahogany), two things I did read about re: shims.

Two things I’ll improve on next time re: shims: Take more time to make them uniformly long and equal in taper is the first. Also, driving home the shims will be a two-step process; the material standing ‘proud’ will be trimmed a bit before shimming, to get the wedging action closer to the workpiece right off the bat. Then do a second trim of material. Hope that makes sense.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 742 days


#6 posted 02-28-2016 03:24 PM

Smitty, I actually cut my wedges with the band saw. You can do that uniformly with a jig as shown in this video. But your picture has inspired me to try riving my
wedges. I wonder how they will taper. Paul Sellers cuts them this way:

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

8735 posts in 1905 days


#7 posted 02-28-2016 03:41 PM

+1 to Andy’s comment, I am interested where the discovery of these fundamentals will take you. Always an interesting and informative read, thank you Smitty.

-- ~Tony

View putty's profile

putty

1009 posts in 1071 days


#8 posted 02-28-2016 03:42 PM

Thanks for posting this Smitty. Nice practice piece for future chair making!

I love the Horse in your blog!

-- Putty

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

1669 posts in 789 days


#9 posted 02-28-2016 04:25 PM

Nice article Smitty. So how well did the shave horse work? Much of a learning curve? I’ve wanted to build one for a while.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13733 posts in 2083 days


#10 posted 02-28-2016 04:51 PM

A learning curve with the horse, yes, but more surprising was the learning curve using a drawknife. It actually works best when there is a slight skewed and slicing motion applied when removing material vs. just pulling it in a back-to-front motion.

Work holding with the horse takes some coordination; pulling harder on the material means pushing strong on the foot piece (whatever it’s called, sorry).

EDIT: And another teaser from the blog, because I can.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#11 posted 02-28-2016 10:00 PM

nice as usual Smitty. I’ve always trimmed, then wedged. (well, not always, its something I learned after a faiulure)

I to usually cut my wedges with the band saw, excpet for very small ones, then they usualy get “rived” with my jack knofe.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 742 days


#12 posted 02-28-2016 10:25 PM

with my jack knofe.

- Don W

That made be laugh made me channel Crocodile Dundee. ” Thats not a knofe now thats a knoife”.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View mafe's profile

mafe

11154 posts in 2554 days


#13 posted 03-03-2016 10:04 PM

Sweet, I love small stools, it’s kind of the basics in a boiled down woodworking.
Made a small 3 leg version some weeks back that I haven’t blogged yet and enjoyed the build so much.
Love to see the teasers.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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