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Stanley #801 Build #2: Design / Build

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 01-25-2016 02:04 PM 1010 reads 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Inspiration and Research Part 2 of Stanley #801 Build series Part 3: Finishing »

Definition, Staging
The No. 801 catalog pics provide overall dimensions, so between those and the build methodology of the No. 888 that I have in-shop, I’m pretty confident that what I’m making can be pretty true to the original. The biggest issue I could identify was hardware. Finding the right metal handle was everything at first, because I was able to move on from there with a sense of confidence in my ability to build a reasonable facsimile of the original. I knew the handle was metal, and that all wood was less than ¾” in thickness. So the base of the handle had to be the right fit.

If you’ve read any of my blogs on LJs, you’ll know I tend to keep things around for a very, very long time in the hopes of someday finding a use for them. The handle I ended up using fits that model. It was painted a bright bluish green, but the base was single-screw and pretty narrow. Folks, we have a winner.

I created the center spar pretty quick after finding the handle, put the two together, then let the project sit for several weeks. Everyone does that, right? :-)

So yeah, I have wood identified to use and it’s scrap wood. Pallet wood, actually, that I ran through the Alien Head planer when I first got that tool and wanted to play with it. It’s pine, somewhat reddish in tint, like a doug fir but who knows for sure. The stuff is essentially clear of knots, though, and less than ¾” thick. After a bit of grain pattern matching and width checks, I glued up pieces that would become the sides and ends then put the project aside for several more weeks. What got me to walk away was ultimately the same thing that got me back to the build (aside from clearing a couple other projects): Hinges. I couldn’t find what I wanted, even with posts on LJs and OldTools. I did, however, find a pair of hinges from Lee Valley in the drawer that were purchased originally for the tool chest but not used. I think they’ll do, he said to himself.

Hardware is, well, Hard!
Title says it all. I had the flathead, slotted screws needed to attached the bottom to the carcase (per the original), but needed round head screws (slotted, of course) to secure the side boards to the center spar. That same screw type could server as the posts for the lid’s securing hooks (oh, I need to find those too), but short screws were needed to attach the hinges to the sides and each lid.

The hinges, as previously mentioned, came from Lee Valley but required some attention with the Dremmel-like tool I’ve had but rarely used before now.

The brass screws came from a local True Value, and the bright screws came from Menard’s (or vise versa, I don’t remember anymore).

The Build!
Despite being a hand tool repository, the build itself included almost exclusive use of stationary power tools (band saw, RAS, table saw). That said, all final finishes are the result of hand planing with the exception of the rabbets done to the underside of the lids.

The lid material is white oak, salvaged from the folding card table project blogged here on LJs. It was also run through the Alien Head Planer (have I mentioned lately how awesome that tool is?) and rabetted to sit nicely on the carcase.

I won’t go into detail on the sliding tool tray, but it was built as well.

Main spar reinforced with screws through each end cap.

I did some chiseling of the lids and sides to ensure the hinges installed flush to each

then used the G-P tool handle awl bit to prep for screws. Before long, all hardware was in place and the box was essentially complete!

That’s all for now, the final finishing is next! As always, thanks for looking.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --



12 comments so far

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8139 posts in 1919 days


#1 posted 01-25-2016 02:32 PM

Good build Smitty. Now you need to find a SweetHeart emblem to complete it. :-)

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2035 days


#2 posted 01-25-2016 02:56 PM

Well done as always.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Brian Gulotta's profile

Brian Gulotta

52 posts in 425 days


#3 posted 01-25-2016 03:00 PM

Looks great Smitty….I’ve definitely got to get started on a tool chest to hold my tools.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2086 days


#4 posted 01-25-2016 03:24 PM

Stay tuned, Kevin. I think there’s a solution for branding the box, even though it’s not a brass tag. Those things are very rare to find and pricey too. The only $ invested in this build should be hardware (hinges, screws, hooks, etc.)

Don, thanks!

Brian – get busy Man! :-) I got a blog here that tells the long and sordid tale of my toolchest, although I’d advise against anyone doing it the way I did. lawl

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View terryR's profile

terryR

6324 posts in 1776 days


#5 posted 01-25-2016 04:06 PM

A great read, and excellent build to follow, Smitty.

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2086 days


#6 posted 01-25-2016 08:15 PM

Thanks, Terry.

Excited about the finishing process, really looking good. Expect the final installment and project post soon!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2248 days


#7 posted 01-25-2016 10:54 PM

Love it Smitty.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5078 posts in 2091 days


#8 posted 01-26-2016 03:10 AM

Alien head planer…..I learn something new every time I stop in. Very cool machine. Oh, and your tool box is pretty cool too! :^)

Concerning finishing, have you utilized brown wax to any extent? I have become more and more fond of it. I use it as a final waxing and it gives a little darkening and patina. Most recently I used it on a refurb/cleaning on a new shop stool. It’s a Sipes telephone operators stool. I haven’t finished the bottom yet.

-- I love Jeeps

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5078 posts in 2091 days


#9 posted 01-26-2016 03:14 AM

Oh, did those hinges rust inside the bag?

I think we need a new term here. In contrast to the Midas touch you have the ”Smitty touch”

Everything you touch appears rustic, vintage and cool. You, sir, have the gift of Wabi Sabi.

-- I love Jeeps

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2086 days


#10 posted 01-26-2016 06:14 AM

That chair is AWESOME!

Brown wax? Must investigate further.

Actually yes, there was rust in the bag. Those Italians think of everything when it comes to throwback hardware. The stuff in the shop is mostly older, right? But who wants to be surrounded by plastic pull-out bins, presss’d wood cabinetsor tools that don’t have cast iron, brass and rosewood?!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View terryR's profile

terryR

6324 posts in 1776 days


#11 posted 01-26-2016 02:25 PM

What a lovely chair!

+1 to brown wax; works magic on stone points and makes them look old. Try some brown shoe polish…very cheap.

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

8743 posts in 1908 days


#12 posted 01-26-2016 02:59 PM

Ever entertained and impressed witnessing your artistry. The pieces fashioned into their proper state so as to coalesce into a piece bearing fit and finish of an era long gone by. The Smitty touch, indeed.

Oh my, that chair is spectacular Mr. Yo.

-- ~Tony

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