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Parlor Table (?) #4: Final Resizing & Cutting Marble

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 08-11-2014 04:01 AM 753 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Top Don't Fit? Trim the Table! Part 4 of Parlor Table (?) series no next part

Once the piece was set and assembled, the clamps were removed and some cleanup was possible. I took the opportunity to use one of my granddad’s tricks on these mitered corners that I’ll recap.

This piece isn’t exactly fine furniture, with nails and mitered corners, but hey, it’s what it is. With the clamps removed, here was a typical corner:

Now, I’m sure others have done this, but to me it was a trick shown to me about thirty+ years ago on dressing corners that may be slightly out of whack. It consists of taps with a hammer to either side of the opening, to press the thinnest extremes of wood towards the open gap. Then a series of taps on the corner, slightly askew, to close it up further.

Some sanding, and here’s the result.

And that’s close enough for rock and roll on this piece, for sure.

Next task was shortening the drawer runners that had been removed earlier. Fortunately the drawer itself was not too long for the revised depth / didn’t need rebuilding as well. Shortening the runners was no big trick…

So I marked them…

And snuck up on the cuts ‘til they fit was just right. Some finish nails and all was back to normal re: drawer.

Next, I turned my attention to the marble top. My LJ Buddy Maur just finished and posted a marble entry table and talked in his writeup about fixing blocks to the underside of the top to keep it from sliding around on the base of his table in use. Well, I need to do that, right? First time for everything, so I turned the table and top upside down to see what could be done.

I marked the location where a couple of simple, long shims would do the job. Those were cut from some walnut scrap and they were stuck in place with contact cement. Here’s proof:

With those in place under a heavy top, we have a top that doesn’t slide around at all. Huzzah!

And because this segment is already getting long, I’ll say ‘until later, for more,’ and thanks for looking!
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.
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But I said there’d be marble cutting, didn’t I? Okay, then let’s cover that. On a whim, I took a few swipes at the edge of some junk cutoffs from this project and it cut. So I pulled the cutoff with an actual ogee corner and decided IF I could cut it to fit, there’d maybe be something unique in the offing for this table. 20 minute later, the hacksaw was the hero.

I jointed the new edge with a course-ish file and all was good.

What’s the piece destined to become? Here’s what I’m thinking…

Until later!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive



15 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

13024 posts in 1987 days


#1 posted 08-11-2014 10:23 AM

Looks great Smitty. As for the miter closing trick I do the same thing but I use a round shank screwdriver to rub it with instead of a hammer. I’ll have to try that.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15029 posts in 1221 days


#2 posted 08-11-2014 10:41 AM

Well done Smitty.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

2121 posts in 784 days


#3 posted 08-11-2014 01:28 PM

I appreciate the work you do, and the time you take to document it. The first thing I ever made with wood had miters like this and they didn’t match up well, so I took a hammer to them. At the time I though it was because I was a hack – but today you validated my inner-craftsman.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

View terryR's profile

terryR

3109 posts in 962 days


#4 posted 08-11-2014 01:45 PM

Nice work, Smitty. The finished? piece looks like a solid user to me! Thanks for sharing all the steps!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9896 posts in 1272 days


#5 posted 08-11-2014 03:23 PM

I see a bit more work to get this piece as good as it can be, Terry. So stay tuned.

Todd, good to hear! Obviously, mitering this kind of casework isn’t the best approach, but we have to make the most of it, right?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4656 posts in 1094 days


#6 posted 08-11-2014 05:27 PM

Smitty, shoring up craftsman’s confidence one project at a time.

Well done and an enjoyable tutelage to be sure. Thank you Smitty.

-- ~Tony

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9896 posts in 1272 days


#7 posted 08-11-2014 05:39 PM

Thanks, Tony. And I just realized this is becoming a wash stand… More ideas to try out now, this may not be half over yet.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

2121 posts in 784 days


#8 posted 08-11-2014 05:42 PM

Ohhhhh. A wash stand. Old school basin type, or modern vessel sink with a drain?

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9896 posts in 1272 days


#9 posted 08-11-2014 05:45 PM

This would be a stand for a pitcher and bowl, very old school. As in, pour the water into the large bowl, wash your face, shave, then toss water out the window. We have a pitcher and bowl that’d look great on this piece, just maybe, when it’s finished.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

2121 posts in 784 days


#10 posted 08-11-2014 05:48 PM

Nice.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

4238 posts in 1104 days


#11 posted 08-11-2014 06:00 PM

Just a quick note Smitty, the hammer technique works on dovetails too! Don’t ask how I know this I just do.
Thanks for marble cutting pics, my mental wheels are turning ( a bit rusty, they squeak)

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

View terryR's profile

terryR

3109 posts in 962 days


#12 posted 08-12-2014 01:49 PM

Hey, don’t laugh at the old wash methods…the friggin power goes out so frequently here in Paradise that’s how we wash off a LOT! Need hot water? Open the hot tub lid. :)

If you already have the ceramic ware, that would make a cool finished piece, IMO!

...still wish you guys would cut stone wet…preaching now I am! And the top would polish up nicely with a lil baking soda and piece of leather.

Smitty, cannot Thank you enough for influencing my life! I can’t wait to get moved, settled in, and start looking for vintage furniture to repair!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10833 posts in 1660 days


#13 posted 08-12-2014 02:01 PM

Bravo Smitty. Another great save. I really like the wash stand idea. We’ve got one just outside the bathroom at our house and its gotten some nice compliments even though its far from a vintage piece.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9896 posts in 1272 days


#14 posted 08-12-2014 05:25 PM

Terry, I’m all over the baking sofa and leather suggestion, thanks!!!

And I’m scouring ebay for some suitable tiles to add to a backslash idea I have…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

#15 posted 08-12-2014 11:16 PM

Hey smitty
That’s what I call real wood working
To take an old furniture and redo it.
Nice work men

-- https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114897950873317692653/114897950873317692653/posts/p/pub

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