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Wall Hung Tool Cabinet #21: Hinges and Hardware - Cabinet Complete

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 01-26-2013 12:51 PM 2656 reads 0 times favorited 59 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 20: M&T Work on Panel Doors, with Video Part 21 of Wall Hung Tool Cabinet series no next part

When we left subject cabinet, the last part of the build was done, as the upper door pieces were cut and fit and glued up. Stiles ran long on the doors, as Lysdexic correctly pointed out, to prevent spitting of the entire stile while the mortises were cut. So we know the doors needed a trim length wise.

What I didn’t realize is how close I had made it re: the rails. You can see in the pics below I had to preserve all of the rail material… Whew…

There was very, very much tailoring to fit with various block planes as well as with the #93 shoulder plane in the rabbets of the center stiles, but I won’t bore you with tons of those pics when one will do.

One door needed adjustment width-wise, and that also was done at the bench. Marked with a T-square, material removed with the #62 and door jointed with the #8.

With all ‘major’ trimming complete, the fit at top and bottom looked good to my eye. Center looked okay, too.

Time to add hardware, beginning with hinges. The inspiration piece has very plain, steel-type hardware.

I shopped one of the on-line catalogs last June and picked out something different.. I knew the ‘steel’ in anything new would be less substantial, and went with three per side. I also wanted a ‘wrap-around’ style of hinge that’d get more surface area contact when mortised in. Took about ten minutes, searching the shop, but I found the box of that held the hinges and got to work. And yes, I used a… a… a… routah. There, I said it. But admitting the problem puts me on the road to a cure, right?

Not enough photographic evidence here, but the first step I took was to mortise the hinges to the carcase. Once that was done, I transferred lines to the face of the carcase sides that were noted with the marking knife to the doors. That told me where to mount the hinges. Oh, and the hinge located were guessed… I went 3” from the top and bottom, then centered the middle one.

Punch for screw locations, pre-drill with grandad’s MF #2 eggbeater, drive screws using the Handyman then repeat the process two more times to get Door #1 done.

Repeat for Door #2 and we’re getting somewhere!

At the point the trim-to-fit activity is pretty much constant, to get the doors working smoothly within the space and with each other where the center stiles meet at the rabbet overlap. And once they were in place, I had to take off the left door to add a necessary but special piece of hardware: a NOS Stanley sliding bolt. I actually didn’t know it was called a Sunk Flush Bolt until I googled the name on the box. Very, very cool. Wish there were more than one, but I’m still tickled to add this kind of vintage detail to my cabinet. I love the hardware, and couldn’t believe it when showed up. Still had waxed paper around it, and all screws. Destiny, I say.

A bit of work with that tailed apprentice mentioned earlier was needed to make the deep channel cuts for the rod, but that went off without a hitch and the bolt was install was complete.

A bit of pencil lead rubbed on the tip of the sliding bolt marked the cabinet header with the location of the strike plate. I then drilled a hole and used that drill bit, in the hole, to align said plate for install.

Added screws, then moved on to the lock. It’s identical to the one I put on the inspiration piece (original being long lost on that cabinet). Mortised the main plate to the backside of the door, very carefully, and that also went off without a problem.

No escutcheon yet, but I’m not going to sweat that one.

Then to the drawers for final fitting, which didn’t long at all, and mounting of pulls. Rather than wood, I opted for vintage ceramic ones on hand. This cabinet still appears to belong in a kitchen vs. the shop, but then parts of it did come from a hoosier, so I’m okay with that ‘mystery.’

Added a pull to the tambour then milled up the last pieces of cherry for the ‘crown moulding’ consisting of a piece of 1/2” x 1” cherry on top of a run of pine cove. This matches the Inspiration Piece in style exactly, although not in material-choice. I attempted to make the cove piece in cherry with a H&R plane, but failed. Maybe next time. I’ll plug the screw holes in base face later, but that’s no big deal. Even without those plugs and without a finish applied, here it is, the completed Tool Cabinet!

Tool layouts inside the cabinet will take forever, and hasn’t been started at this point. So I won’t be posting this as a completed project within LJs until that time. I’ll let the cherry darken for awhile, too, before adding finish. Thanks for following along with the long (very long) blog series and especially for commenting along the way. It’s been fun!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive



59 comments so far

View chrisstef's profile (online now)

chrisstef

10944 posts in 1673 days


#1 posted 01-26-2013 01:49 PM

Smitty, youve done it ole boy! It looks like you had a lot of fun building this one. Well thought out and well done my man. Stef likey.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Don W's profile

Don W

15060 posts in 1235 days


#2 posted 01-26-2013 02:22 PM

what a great cabinet! I can’t wait to see her full.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9954 posts in 1285 days


#3 posted 01-26-2013 02:32 PM

The build was a challenge

—Working with tambour the first time
—Working with cherry the first time
—Making repetitive M&T joints with handsaw
—Sliding till door (although that was inspired by the sliding deadman on my bench)

It’s not a practical form for things like kitchen cabinets, of course, but for a stand-alone piece it was a great learning exercise. It’s clear to me that a base needs to be built specifically for it, now that it’s done. But don’t ask when. It’s definitely a ‘someday’ thing, if ever.

Thanks for the comments, Don and Stef!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5313 posts in 1265 days


#4 posted 01-26-2013 02:45 PM

Really turned out nice Smitty. You have done a great job with this project/blog. Looking forward to the final post and stocking.

View jap's profile

jap

1231 posts in 721 days


#5 posted 01-26-2013 02:45 PM

great job

-- Joel

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5313 posts in 1265 days


#6 posted 01-26-2013 03:22 PM

I think it deserves a base, for sure. My suggestion (you may take it for the little value it has ) would be to lay out/stock the top. Use it for a while. See what fits, what you like and don’t like, and what you wish it had…then incorporate that into the base. Some larger drawers, removable trays, and what not.

What are the approximate dimensions? And empty weight?...if you were to guess

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1543 posts in 939 days


#7 posted 01-26-2013 03:39 PM

Smitty,

...another great project blog, ...but I’m not ready for it to be over.

Your transformation of the “Hoosier Cabinet” to the “Wheres’yer Cabinet’
and on to the “Oh, Theres’yer Cabinet, again” to the grand finale, “What’cha’putin’inyer Cabinet”.

Smitty, I am Smitt’en.

What a wonderful ‘Hand Tool’ useage resource of practice and procedure for those LJs interested in taking a giant step backwards, into the time of, the ‘Art of Hand Tooled Craftsmanship’.
No, I’m not referring to it as fine furniture, but to the usage of tools without electrical power sources (‘routah’ aside).

I for one, thoroughly enjoyed your cabinet’s Journey to it’s new purpose.
Your willingness to take the EXTRA time (a lot of extra time) to share your talents with us is beyond comendable.

Best Regards
Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len. :-)

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9954 posts in 1285 days


#8 posted 01-26-2013 04:54 PM

Len, wow. Thank you for that, very nice. It’s been a challenge, pulling myself back to this build when it was easy to ‘let it sit.’ But I knew (( hoped) there were folks on LJs that were watching and being patient. :-)

A couple more pics to add now. I forgot these handles. They’re also Stanley OEM, japanned chest handles with orig. slotted screws! It’s just what the tool doctor ordered.

Shane, it’s 31” wide, 47” high. Weight? Maybe 40 lbs?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4735 posts in 959 days


#9 posted 01-26-2013 05:00 PM

Awesome. It looks great. I too really like that NOS Stanley bolt. It’s even SW!

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Don W's profile

Don W

15060 posts in 1235 days


#10 posted 01-26-2013 05:07 PM

Smitty, is that handled marked “Stanley” anywhere? I just pulled a handle just like that out of the bottom of one of my drawers to put where it belongs. That would be cool if i found out it was made by Stanley. Mine is old and rusted, but i know how to fix that if needed.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9954 posts in 1285 days


#11 posted 01-26-2013 05:14 PM

Don, yes they are. Small Stanley logo in the top, dead-center of the plate, public side.

You know, I have two more pair in that box and will send you one pair if you’re interested. No screws, though…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Don W's profile

Don W

15060 posts in 1235 days


#12 posted 01-26-2013 05:17 PM

Thanks Smit, I don’t really have a use right now (but I won’t forget :-)), I’ll have to clean mine up and see if its stamped. I just found it and figured I put it where I’d know where it was if I happened to need it. If its not stanley, it may end up on the trap door to the attic.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1543 posts in 939 days


#13 posted 01-26-2013 05:22 PM

...wh, ...Wha, ...WHAT ???!!!

It’s Portable? ...it’s 31” wide, 47” high. Weight? Maybe 40 lbs?, empty that is.

After appointed with those beautiful Hand Tools, remember to lift with your legs!! ;-)

Lift Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View terryR's profile

terryR

3139 posts in 975 days


#14 posted 01-26-2013 05:22 PM

Very impressive! I love every bit of the cabinet…excepp the thought of lifting that bad boy! :)

+1 on the SW bolt and other Stanley original hardware…sweet bling!

Truely an heirloom cabinet

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9954 posts in 1285 days


#15 posted 01-26-2013 05:31 PM

I’ll tell you what, Len. It’s portable when Empty, and that’s about it. Just hefting the thing around to add hardware was a real pain, and I felt stupid not putting the handles on much sooner. :-)

Thanks, Terry! It’s a bit selfish to use NOS, but I’m over it already. lol…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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