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Refurb, Antique Walnut Table #5: A Serious Setback

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 01-03-2013 03:28 AM 2050 reads 0 times favorited 64 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Scraping By on a Formerly Split Top Part 5 of Refurb, Antique Walnut Table series Part 6: It's Mahogany, Man! And it's Porous! »

Not a good situation, my friends, with the finish. The pores (that’s what I’ll call them, I assume that’s what they’re referred to, pls enlighten) are light in color and the finish is at a stand still.

First, a grainy picture taken yesterday with mineral spirits applied…

Now, after four applications of wipe-on poly, severe ugliness.

This is a severe blow… The clear grain is where there was more sanding, to clear the deep scratches seen in earlier pics. Arghh… Need input, not happy. Sad, in fact. This is not what I wanted…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive



64 comments so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5409 posts in 1316 days


#1 posted 01-03-2013 03:33 AM

dang…you could add up all I know about finishing, and it wouldn”t even fill a thimble. May be back to the Sscraper/ROS. Then pore filler, then poly. But, I have NO idea what I am talking about…which is usually the case.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#2 posted 01-03-2013 03:34 AM

Pore filler = wet sanding of some kind… need input… Arghh, he said again.

Thanks, Shane.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#3 posted 01-03-2013 03:38 AM

Huh? doesn’t make sense to me but I know less about finishing than Shane. I do wet sand my first coat of WOP with 400 grit but this in no way suggest that wet sanding would have avoided “this.”

I sit back and learn.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Dave's profile

Dave

11189 posts in 1557 days


#4 posted 01-03-2013 03:39 AM

What ever you used as a finish is reacting with the original in the pores.
Did you use a poly- spirit mix?

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#5 posted 01-03-2013 03:39 AM

Black wax?

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#6 posted 01-03-2013 03:42 AM

Yes, a mix Dave. Minwax wipe-on poly is a poly / mineral spirits blend (right?). I’m guessing sand until gone, or ???

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Dave's profile

Dave

11189 posts in 1557 days


#7 posted 01-03-2013 03:51 AM

You can try a modified oil that will cure quickly. If that gets it to the same color and cures all the way. Seal it with shellac.Then you can do what ever finish you like.
Or sand it.
If you sand it I would still seal it with shellac after I sanded so the same thing wont happen.
Stay away with the spirits.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#8 posted 01-03-2013 03:53 AM

This from a fellow LJ, kwhit, in another post re: finishing mahogany…

“I don’t use shellac for my mahogany projects. I like like poly varnish. But I put on a usual 3 seal coats of 50/50 varnish & mineral spirits. Letting each coat dry complete before applying the other coat. Sanding with 220 grit in between coats. I’ve tried pore filler a few times but I don’t like using sand to fill the pores. Thats what the stuff is! I perfer to use the cut sealer. After the sealer is completely dry I usually put on 2 coats of un-cut poly varnish. Making sure each coat is well dry.”

Another said he doesn’t fill pores at all. This table has a problem.

I’ll let it dry completely, then out comes the sander I guess. I know that if I sand it down enough, as I did in the areas not pore-speckled, it will be fine.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#9 posted 01-03-2013 03:55 AM

This is why I’m baffled with finishes. So much info. I trust Super completely, but I really hate shellac… What kind of ‘modified oil’ would you suggest? Something like Minwax Antique Oil is supposedly a modified oil, and I have it on hand. Or I’ll get whatever… I will likely have to add darker color to it now, though, so it’s consistent with the aprons and legs.

Bhog, want to make a trip to my town? :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Dave's profile

Dave

11189 posts in 1557 days


#10 posted 01-03-2013 04:14 AM

I am in agreement on the sanding.
Fixing it as is will be hard and time consuming.
Get you some sand and seal. Apply two coats. Sanding between. Its just 1 pound blond shellac. It will prevent that from happening again. Then you can do whatever finish you want.
A modified oil is an oil they have additives in it to cure it faster. Minwax Antique Oil is great. If you oil it with teak or BLO you would have to wait a LONG time for it to cure. I hate waiting on finish to cure. I was hoping the oil would blend the color.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#11 posted 01-03-2013 04:26 AM

So sand, then sand and seal, then back to the wipe on poly?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11346 posts in 1407 days


#12 posted 01-03-2013 04:39 AM

Smitty- I’d sand that back to bare wood, fill pores with Timbermate (comes in grain matched colors), and redo the poly. Timbermate is NOT sand and is really easy to use and sands after only a few minutes dry time. I have used Brazillian Cherry Timbermate to darken/redden mahogany that I thought was too light. Is there a spot under the top you could experiment on to get the color you want?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#13 posted 01-03-2013 04:50 AM

Here it is, looks pretty straightforward.

The Timerbermate website is useful. Says it can be mixed with stain prior to applying, to get the color desired… Boy, that’d be rather final… Checking where to get it. I’m shellac averse…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Dave's profile

Dave

11189 posts in 1557 days


#14 posted 01-03-2013 04:51 AM

That will work great Smitty. The sand and seal is fast drying.
It is a big crap shoot when you are mixing unknown finishes. You are not sure what material was on the table. So when you applied your finish the left over reacted differently.
Good luck!

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10190 posts in 1336 days


#15 posted 01-03-2013 05:11 AM

Thanks, Super, for the vote of confidence. This has already been a hard lesson; thought I had it whooped and was on the downhill run, I really did. Oh well. The aggravation continues. I’ll get the mixing base and the brazilian cherry gfad recommends and in the meantime, I’ll get to sanding. sigh

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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