LumberJocks

Refurb, Antique Walnut Table #3: Pop the Top...

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 01-02-2013 12:53 AM 1581 reads 0 times favorited 31 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: From the Bottom Up, Perhaps? Part 3 of Refurb, Antique Walnut Table series Part 4: Scraping By on a Formerly Split Top »

Okay, I’ve decided the glue blocks along the ‘short side’ of the top must go in order to pull of the repair. The hinge screws simply will not budge, and I’d rather not bunge them up.

So a flat chisel should do it.

It was short work, and with two pocket screws removed the piece was removed.

Pretty filthy edge, but a very interesting dovetail key for those who love run-on sawing…

Some scraping of the edges and things were coming together.

Some ‘o-so-tiny’ planing with the Sargent block and the crack essentially disappeared.

Before gluing up the matched and jointed top, I had to address wood movement in the hopes it wouldn’t happen again. Lots of good input from fellow LJs that included ‘buttons’ and that’s what I decided to do. Started with a piece of wood from the scrap crock, did a rabbet with the #78 then dressed the pieces to better size with the jack plane before cutting with the G-P. I cut 3/4s of the way through then stopped to pre-drill for the screws (you’ll see that in the pics).

With blocks cut, time to set the groove in the apron of the table. On the short side. I set the marking gauge and traced the inside of the apron.

Time to cut the groove…

Pick the iron from the #50 cutter box.

Clean up at the stopped ends and it’s ready to go!

Time to glue! Blocks ride towards to top, with a couple other short Bessee clamps holding the top straight to the apron.

Clean up the squeeze out and history was made: the top is again complete.

More to come, and thanks for looking!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive



31 comments so far

View Mosquito's profile (online now)

Mosquito

4651 posts in 929 days


#1 posted 01-02-2013 01:29 AM

Wow, very nice work Smitty

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4579 posts in 1077 days


#2 posted 01-02-2013 01:29 AM

Would the center saw kerf be from a cut to facilitate removing the waste more easily? What type of drill bit is it that you are using to make your buttons?

Great work and brilliant documentation. Thank you Smitty.

-- ~Tony

View bhog's profile

bhog

2087 posts in 1327 days


#3 posted 01-02-2013 01:32 AM

Sweet!!. Nice work as always Smitt.Looks like you are going to need to learn to lay shellac… ;)

-- I don't drive a Prius.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4856 posts in 1214 days


#4 posted 01-02-2013 02:21 AM

Thanks for the detailed pictures, Smitty.

Table’s looking good.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9836 posts in 1256 days


#5 posted 01-02-2013 03:02 AM

Bit bought at a flea mkt – .50 for it. Works, but I’d like to sharpen it somehow, someday…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9836 posts in 1256 days


#6 posted 01-02-2013 03:03 AM

Blocks installed!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4579 posts in 1077 days


#7 posted 01-02-2013 03:24 AM

I had no idea such a critter existed; thanks. Vintage drill/countersink in one.

The shrinkage buttons look great.

-- ~Tony

View ichbinpete's profile

ichbinpete

109 posts in 1329 days


#8 posted 01-02-2013 03:34 AM

love the pics and beautiful work!

-- It is better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4800 posts in 1260 days


#9 posted 01-02-2013 04:46 AM

How in the world did you plane a groove in the apron with a #50 in so little space. I want to see a picture of your knuckles.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9836 posts in 1256 days


#10 posted 01-02-2013 04:51 AM

very carefully… :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Brit's profile

Brit

5132 posts in 1480 days


#11 posted 01-02-2013 08:04 AM

I find it amazing when you see nice work like that dovetail joint, that the maker didn’t allow for movement in the top. They obviously had skills, but they still made a schoolboy error. Luckily for that old table, Smitty is on the case.

Lovely job. I always learn something from your good self. Thanks.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9836 posts in 1256 days


#12 posted 01-02-2013 05:01 PM

Thanks, Pete, Glad you Like! Not a ton of restoration-type posts on LJs that I’ve come across. Maybe time to ask Martin for a dedicated forum OR to start a ‘Furniture Restoration of your Dreams…’ :-)

Andy, that DT key was amazing to look at when I first pulled the top. Outstanding work, for sure. I guess this table proves again what we are always told: Wood moves, get over it. The make obviously didn’t think it’d apply to his project. Wrong.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6811 posts in 1789 days


#13 posted 01-02-2013 05:39 PM

I love the pic of the dovetailed tenon, on the front stretcher. I’ve done that joint on a shaker table and that little trick would have saved some time! So much to learn from this old table huh?

Wow cool counter sink bit!

Did you have any issues with alignment? I guess not, looks like you didn’t need dowels or biscuits or anything.

+1 to what Scott said, I don’t know how you did a stopped groove with a #50?

I think the maker knew about wood movement, I also think he knew that the table would outlast him so he saved some time in attaching the top knowing it wouldn’t blow out until he and the client were long and gone.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

543 posts in 1137 days


#14 posted 01-02-2013 05:42 PM

Smitty,

I guess you didn’t put back the screws in the pocket holes.
Were the pocket hole circular or oblong (or large enough) to allow for screw/wood movment?
I wander if the glue blocks were added later by somebody not understanding why the top was allowed to move a little bit (if it was the case)?

I also wander when, in furniture history, pocket holes were first used?

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6811 posts in 1789 days


#15 posted 01-02-2013 05:45 PM

I think Adam Cherabini (sp?) wrote something somewhere about vintage pocket hole joinery with a special bit. Maybe its the same one that Smitty is using.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

showing 1 through 15 of 31 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase