LumberJocks

Misc. Shop Stuff #13: A Wedge for a Round

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 11-30-2012 10:01 PM 1117 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: Atkins 'Floral' Handsaw Refurb Part 13 of Misc. Shop Stuff series Part 14: Flea Mkt Finds »

A very quick installment to confess my sin: I destroyed a wooden, skewed rabbet plane today. Yes, I know, that’s bad. Can it be justified, however, by the fact that it was already modified, not complete AND could be used to resurrect two more useful planes? The skewed rabbet has been around for a couple of years, unused. And crooked. Then I picked up four wooden planes last weekend that included a H&R pair. Owners mark and maker stamps matched on three of them, too. But neither the round nor the square rabbet had a wedge, and the profile needed an iron. Something had to give, so I decided to use the body of the old $5 rabbet to make a new wedge to match the one on the round plane.

!!

I cut the donor on the bandsaw and thinned it with jack planes (#5 and #62).

With some rasp and just bit of sandpaper work, the wedge and finial were done and I could move to the tip of the wedge for final shaping. Because the wedge of a wooden plane is shaped to eject shavings, it’s an important detail. I patterned my ‘new’ one after the one on the hollow.

I used my Diamond Edge butt chisels to remove that material, using them as carvers almost. It was fun working with the beech. Neat stuff!

With all the shaping of the wedge complete, there’s one question to ask: Does the plane work? Yes!

And the ‘family’ is together and complete.

Is it perfect? Well, no. But it’s right, and makes the tool useable. My first attempt, too. So I’m happy. $20 into wooden moulders, and two complete H&R users so far. Next is to use the iron from the donor rabbet in the profile moulder shown on the left, above. It came without an iron, but I hope to reshape the donor into the right profile to get to three planes. More on that later…

As always, thanks for looking!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive



8 comments so far

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1514 posts in 928 days


#1 posted 11-30-2012 10:23 PM

Smitty,

Nice refurb on the ‘round’, albeit cannibalistic, being a family member and all.

...but hey if you’re gonna’ make an omelette, you gotta break some eggs…

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4690 posts in 947 days


#2 posted 11-30-2012 11:05 PM

You and that #62…

You going to try to age the wedge? It looks great, but new…

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9916 posts in 1274 days


#3 posted 11-30-2012 11:14 PM

And I need another wedge out of the ‘new’ material, too. A good reddish stain would age it, I suppose. Time to experiment when both fabs are done.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View bhog's profile

bhog

2141 posts in 1345 days


#4 posted 11-30-2012 11:17 PM

Nice Smitt.I dont know if I would have been able to cut into the rabbet plane, I can sometimes be “chicken”.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 2459 days


#5 posted 11-30-2012 11:43 PM

Dang, neanderthals got snuff blogs.

Seriously, nice work – I probably would have looked around for some other stock, but if the plane had already been modified beyond restoration, why not?

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9916 posts in 1274 days


#6 posted 11-30-2012 11:49 PM

Arm, yes, I would not have used the donor (and actually didn’t). At least this way I have good users. H&R tools are much higher on the food chain than a rabbet, in that I have very functional shoulder planes and a #278, for example. I know what you mean, though.

B, I thought about it for days but decided a tool never used in any way is a waste. It was crooked and cracked, and I jointed the sides some time ago in an attempt to make it usuable. Didn’t have the desired effect.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2906 posts in 1142 days


#7 posted 12-01-2012 12:33 AM

Smitty, this is just a question on orientation, but I need to ask!

Most of the wooden moulding planes I’ve seen have a wedge with the grain sloping down to the pinnacle of the wedge.

I was taught that if the grain went the other direction ie: against the pinnacle, it could cause chatter and make use a lot rougher.

How did this work out for you? I have a couple of wooden moulders that I want to rehab when I get time, but it will be awhile before I get to them.

Oh, Yeah, I have some antique oak chunks that would make great wedges, and a little research on the movie set boards can show you how to age the wood like the original!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9916 posts in 1274 days


#8 posted 12-01-2012 01:05 AM

Dallas, I consider myself schooled… What you say makes total sense, of course. I’m looking at the pic if the pattern piece, though, and it looks like that grain orientation is less than optimal, too.

Your lesson is learned here, thanks for speaking up! :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase