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Roubo Cabinet #10: Placing the Backpanel

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 05-26-2011 11:44 PM 2939 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Framed Backpanel Part 10 of Roubo Cabinet series Part 11: Carcase Glue-Up »

With the back panel released from pipe-clamp jail and kinda-sorta smoothed with a #4, time to get it ready for fitting to the back of the carcase. What I want to do is get this panel inset into a groove planed (yes, with the #48!) inside said carcase so it floats in place / can expand and contract its little heart out. The panel will be ‘tongued’ on all four sides, so in order to get the ‘un-tongued’ dimensions right I first had to clamp the carcase tight to get a ‘finished’ inside dimension for the back panel.

Along with that, I jointed a long edge on the panel itself. Knocked a bevel on the end to avoid end-grain blow out then planed it smooth

With the backpanel placed underneath the clamped-up carcase, I was able to measure the absolute max dimensions; from there I set the radial arm saw and worked on cutting the panel to width (actually, height of the in-place cabinet) with a number of passes.

Have you ever tried to ‘sneak up’ on a cut like that? Be honest…

Well, this time it didn’t work for me and I’ll tell you what happened. I have a 2-foot rule that I’m trying very hard to make my go-to measuring tool while doing these kinds of “furniture” builds. And up until this point I was doing pretty good. But this time, the measure fell inside the brass-joined hinge sections of the rule; when I translated said measure to the blade of the RAS, I was off by one half inch, so now the panel fit totally inside the opening rather being T&G ready as planned. Did the cutting correctly on the ends of the panel (whew!) so I moved on to the #48 cuts to get the panel as well as the endcaps of the carcase cut. Grooves worked right into the mitered tails, looks great! Whew. This part of the plan worked…

So how does the carcase look with a backside? Not too bad.

In that last pic you can see that visible ‘ends’ to the dados I cut for the partitions. If I had done the rabbeted backpanel solution discussed earlier, those would now be out of sight. Do they bother me now, being visible on the back of the cabinet? A bit, to be disgustingly honest about it. And the major impetus for doing mitered dovetails in the first place was for the backside rabbets. But it’s either remake the backpanel or live with these construction ‘clues’ on the backside of a cabinet that sits under my workbench. Uhmmm… let’s see… Well… I think I’ll chalk it up to lesson learned and move on!

Oh, yes, did I mention the partitions? There’s one more value-add task needed to make those ready for glue-up, and that is to cut them to their now-final ‘depth.’ I marked each with the measurement taken with the backpanel in place, then cut them with a hand saw… Decided to go that way over free-handing at the table saw or using the band saw. Really, it’s just as easier to rip them by hand using a sharp saw and a sawbench.

So, finally, the carcase is in final form, ready for glue-up. How ‘bout a glamour shot? Queue the pretty girls! Wait, don’t have any of those standing by. So, all you get is the cabinet…

Now to figure out, in the absence of T&Gs, how to stabilize the horizontal runs of the panel. The plan is to friction fit a couple of dowels, dead-center, to each of the top and bottom rails to hold the panel in place from whatever front-to-back stress it may receive (like slamming drawers). Could use four slotted screws from the outside, but just can’t bring myself to do it.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive



8 comments so far

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1491 days


#1 posted 05-27-2011 03:13 AM

Looking very nice Smitty. I am sure you are proud of your project. As you should be. It is shaping up nicely. Could you pin it with some square walnut dowels on your panels and where you said you needed some screws.imho. Now to tell the truth I see your carcase sitting in my living room with a big screen on top and all my on the components stuffed in the shelves.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1305 days


#2 posted 05-27-2011 03:19 AM

I am loving this build. Keep it up.

The walnut you are working with is great, it reminds me a lot of the stuff I have in my shop.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View tsangell's profile

tsangell

210 posts in 1344 days


#3 posted 05-27-2011 05:54 AM

I’m enjoying it, too. I love the hand tool heavy approach.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9887 posts in 1269 days


#4 posted 05-27-2011 06:52 AM

@tsangell- Glad you enjoy the project, it’s been fun. Thanks for reading!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2299 days


#5 posted 05-27-2011 06:56 AM

great work!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9887 posts in 1269 days


#6 posted 05-27-2011 06:57 AM

@RG- I do like the way walnut responds to hand tools; it really is my favorite material but I’m anxious to do something in cherry, someday. I’ve read folks who prefer it over anything else…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9887 posts in 1269 days


#7 posted 05-27-2011 07:02 AM

@Super – OMG, I’ve built a TV cart??? :-) Of course, things like this, if built well enough, are around long enough to get ‘repurposed’ many times. So, maybe it’s not as far fetched as it first seems. You’re a prophet, my friend! Thanks for commenting!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1305 days


#8 posted 05-27-2011 04:38 PM

Cherry is a treat too. I Like it all…except Mesquite which is my favorite Plane-making wood, and my least favorite wood to work.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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