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Misc. Shop Stuff #67: Tumbler for Small Stuff

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 02-26-2018 10:30 PM 822 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 66: Nail (Screw) Cabinet - Final Assembly Part 67 of Misc. Shop Stuff series Part 68: Unusual SW Marking »

I have a Folgers tub mostly full of 1” slotted screws, but they’re a rusty mess.

I recently heard a clothes dryer works as a parts tumbler, so here we go! Start with rusty screws and a tightly lidded / sealed container.

Tumble with a medium load of towels about 30 minutes and the threads and slots were looking much better.

Lots of pulverized rust left behind!

I then soaked them with WD-40 and let them dry in the sun before a final wipe down with a rag.

Ready for later use!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --



15 comments so far

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5256 posts in 2741 days


#1 posted 02-26-2018 11:38 PM

You are a clever boy.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - out_of_focus1.618

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17631 posts in 3124 days


#2 posted 02-26-2018 11:43 PM

Wife on vacation?

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5256 posts in 2741 days


#3 posted 02-26-2018 11:50 PM

THAT is a good question.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - out_of_focus1.618

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

3125 posts in 1442 days


#4 posted 02-27-2018 12:02 AM

Clever. Glad the screws stayed inside the container, you’d have needed to do laundry otherwise ;-)

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15519 posts in 2736 days


#5 posted 02-27-2018 12:09 AM

Hah, wife actually took an interest in this project. Mostly with the wrapping and tape up, of course.

Lots of tape, rag wrapped, etc. etc. Went well!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3655 posts in 1395 days


#6 posted 02-27-2018 12:45 PM

I read about this dryer trick too and wondered if it would really work. I am so glad you tried it! (My wife is too. LOL.)

Now that it does. I wonder if it would work in a rock tumbler.

Or just make my own.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4371 posts in 3852 days


#7 posted 02-27-2018 01:31 PM

Good save on those slotted flat-head screws! They are becoming more and more difficult to find, and they are my favorite to use, where appearance is important.

I thought about putting rusty hardware in a clean empty paint can, and asking the local paint store if they’d put it on their shaker, but your idea makes much more sense. Wonder if a handful of Black Beauty or other blasting media might help?

Fantastic idea, Smitty!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15519 posts in 2736 days


#8 posted 02-27-2018 01:36 PM

I did a second batch, PK, and added a handful of sand. Seemed to make cleanup after a little easier. I’m sure adding media couldn’t hurt at all. Thanks Kat, and I totally agree re: slotted screws.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

9962 posts in 2558 days


#9 posted 02-27-2018 03:04 PM

HAHAHA!! @ Wife on vacation question.

Thanks for sharing the results of putting the interwebs to the test.

-- ~Tony

View Don W's profile

Don W

18938 posts in 2685 days


#10 posted 02-27-2018 07:33 PM

you definitely want to make sure the lid is on tight!!

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View 489tad's profile

489tad

3404 posts in 3129 days


#11 posted 02-28-2018 12:14 AM

The wife question was funny.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2595 posts in 700 days


#12 posted 02-28-2018 01:52 AM

Pulverized walnut shells or ground corn-cobs are what I use to clean brass for reloading. Don’t see why either of those wouldn’t work on screws. I think I paid about $30 for my brass tumbler when one of the local gun shops went out of business over a decade back. The media is under $10 for enough to do dozens of batches.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View 7davenj88's profile

7davenj88

7 posts in 219 days


#13 posted 03-07-2018 04:46 PM

Smitty,

I would like to get a copy of the high resolution picture showing the Stanley No. 444 dovetail detail dimensions for various thicknesses of wood. You mentioned it in your Lumberjack’s 3-part discussion on the Stanley 444. If you could send it to davenj@penn.com I would greatly appreciate it. I have recently acquired a Stanley 444 and I am trying to figure out how to set it up. I have seen various low resolution versions of the diagram online but none are readable.

-- davenj

View ElroyD's profile

ElroyD

108 posts in 706 days


#14 posted 03-08-2018 12:14 AM

Hold onto that powdered rust. It’s a nice pigment for milk paint.

-- Elroy

View mafe's profile

mafe

11741 posts in 3207 days


#15 posted 05-12-2018 05:44 PM

That sure is a clever idea.
When I was a boy, my grandfather had us straighten out, then wire brush old nails and screws, the he put them in old tobacco tins with a few drops of oil and we were shaking them. Like this they were ready for a new life. He had stacks of these old tins.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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