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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 08-04-2017 05:57 PM 584 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

So if you’ve got Hollows and Rounds, and/or dedicated profile planes that look like this:

Then you’ve at least considered making a sticking board something akin to this:

I’m struggling with the idea of having a dedicated sticking board though. To make trim for ‘typical’ casework, I’m guessing 6’ or so of a continuous run is what you’d want… so the board would be at least 6’ 6” long. And to adjust for different widths of stuff (so the edge of a 4” or 5” wide piece of stock could always be positioned to slightly overhang the sticking board OR be fully supported, either one), the top ‘fence’ needs to slide and the base of the jig needs to be 8” to 10” wide.

That’s one helluva jig to store.

Anyone else gone through this kind of angst? Am I overthinking? Dialog sought, thanks.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --



20 comments so far

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

2026 posts in 815 days


#1 posted 08-04-2017 06:10 PM

Mebbees, a fence permanently attached to an edge of a workbench? Or, perhaps, hinged to same? So it can be swung out of the way? I’ve honestly never given any thought to how people who do such things hold the workpiece. Just always assumed it’s held between dogs on a very large bench top.

-- Mark

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14622 posts in 2370 days


#2 posted 08-04-2017 06:19 PM

The board pictured above is simply a 2×6 with 1×2 screwed to the top. That’s pretty big, but much better than the 1×11 I was originally considering…

If you’re working stick stock, Mark, the center of the longer piece needs to be braced against the long fence of a sticking board so the plane can be held to it. Less of a concern when edging a 1×4 or more, but it’s still the concern.

At least that what I’ve read and how others do this.

The Schwarz has evolved to tacking a 1x piece of stock directly to the top of his workbench to serve as then fence when sticking mouldings; I’m not there (yet) in my thinking.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View schnable's profile

schnable

24 posts in 1833 days


#3 posted 08-04-2017 06:23 PM

gosh – I hate to see you overthink it. Perhaps you should trade me all those lovely planes for my old PC690 router. Problem solved!

-- Andrew

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14622 posts in 2370 days


#4 posted 08-04-2017 06:25 PM

Tempting, Andrew. Let me get back to you on that. ;-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8969 posts in 2202 days


#5 posted 08-04-2017 06:45 PM

I have a long batten with dowels spaced to fit the dog holes and runs 90* across my bench. I then just use my holdfasts to clamp down a piece of stock parallel to the front edge leaving enough room for the stock being worked on. This has worked well so far.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14622 posts in 2370 days


#6 posted 08-04-2017 06:49 PM

^^ Now that’s smart thinking! Strong contender right there… One 90 degree jig and scrap vs. a big sticking board.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8969 posts in 2202 days


#7 posted 08-04-2017 07:24 PM

since it runs across my whole bench t works as a planing stop as well

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14622 posts in 2370 days


#8 posted 08-04-2017 08:09 PM

It doesn’t offer the flexibility of the wood screw stops typically found at the end of a sticking board though. I’ve got such as batten, but I couldn’t tell you the number of times it’s thickness has simply been wrong for the task at hand…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8969 posts in 2202 days


#9 posted 08-04-2017 08:16 PM

I have a second appliance, an L shaped one made from a 2buh4 and plywood. Just clamp it in the leg vise at what ever height I need. Since I seem to drive my planes into whatever is on the bench I make sure the Whatevers can’t hurt the cutters. :-)

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View duckmilk's profile (online now)

duckmilk

2353 posts in 1076 days


#10 posted 08-04-2017 09:44 PM

Smitty, I don’t recall if your bench has a tail vise of some sort or not. If it does, clamp the piece of stock between it and a dog and use Kevin’s idea to support the back with a fence held by holdfasts. Don’t know if my feeble description makes sense of not.

Edit: Instead of the batten that Kevin uses, use a wooden bench dog and one in the tail vise. Then copy the rest of his setup.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View oltexasboy1's profile

oltexasboy1

249 posts in 1456 days


#11 posted 08-05-2017 05:06 PM

Smitty, check out this planning board.https://wb8nbs.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/portable-planing-board/
I made one to use with my #45 because you can work on the very edge of the board and it still be secured
by this planning device. I works as both a holding appliance for edge work but also as a sticker board. I made a minor mod to mine by adding a let-in planning stop I got from Lee Valley at the end of the board instead of using a screw. Mine is ugly and made out of scraps but it works especially for molding plane edge work where you need
to use the board or bench top as a reference face for the fenceon your plane like the #45. I think you could modify it to suit your needs.
this is the stop I am talking about, I use it at the left end, instead of the wooden strip to hold the piece in place .
http://www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/page.aspx?p=31148&cat=1,41637

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3038 posts in 1029 days


#12 posted 08-05-2017 08:45 PM

I don’t see why you couldn’t make the planning board be assembled out of say four 20” pieces that lock together with hold fasts and tongue & groove or sliding dove tails and/or screws or other metal hardware. Maybe a set of lock together bench hooks. I will think about how to engineer this, but I am sure collectively we could find a solution.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14622 posts in 2370 days


#13 posted 08-09-2017 02:45 AM

Thank you, OleTexasBoy, for posting your blog page, because in those pages I was inspired to try this solution. It also traces to Kevin and Duck’s comments, I’d say. The board is a salvage piece of thick-ish stock rabbeted on one edge and cut straight on the other.

The wood screws are long, and run horizontal into the board (not into the bench!) so there’s no need for a base board / sticking board ‘assembly.’ Simple is good…

So I’ve ended up (at this point, anyway) with an appliance that’s just under 6’ long, pinches between end vise and bench dog/stop, and uses the bench as the base when larger pieces of stock are being worked.

Good for a start, let the shop trials begin! Might add a 1x piece on top of what I’ve got; one that’s grooved along one edge in case I have the urge to try sash. Thanks for contributing to the thought process, fellow LJs.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7699 posts in 1237 days


#14 posted 08-09-2017 04:42 AM

Need… action… shots…

For research of course…

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3038 posts in 1029 days


#15 posted 08-09-2017 11:00 AM

I thought the problem was how to store the appliance.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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