LumberJocks

Scoops #1: How I cut one-piece scoops

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Blog entry by Jim Jakosh posted 05-17-2016 12:59 AM 1365 reads 9 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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I wanted to do a video on making scoops but my camera is not set up for what I want to do so I’ll do it in pictures.
The first thing you need to do when making a scoop is to determine the volume needed and then calculate the dimensions needed . The Volume is Pi x R squared x depth. For this one the target is a 3/4 cup scoop
The volume of a cup is 14.437 cubic inches. 3/4 cup is 10.828 Cubic inches. I want a 3”ID scoop so the formula is
10.828cubic inches= ( 3.1416×1.5” Squared) x D Then D= 1.532”
Or if there is not a target, just figure on the size you want to make it and then lay it out on a block and make sure you have enough scrap at the end of the handle and the opposite end behind the scoop, and for the spigot on the bottom of the cup area after you turn the outside dimension.

I found this piece of real red box elder and was going to make a 3” scoop and have some scrap on top of the cup area for counterweight but I thought that wood is too pretty to turn it all away as scrap so I decided to make 2 scoops and glue on some other wood for the counterweight.


I cut away all the unnecesary wood and glued on the counterweitghts.

After the glue was dry, I put centers in the blocks along the center of the cup and the center of the handle .
I rough turned the handle just to make it round and then turn the bottom of the scoop to the final dimension which is 3 3/8”. I do this first so I have a target for turning the handle. I want it to be tangent to the body of the scoop.. I also put on a spigot to hold the scoop for boring the inside.


During the turning of one handle I found a crack clear through the handle so I had to stop and CA glue it to make it sound.

I finish turning the handles to size and then chuck the scoop by the spigot and part off the counterweight or cut it off in the band saw( which is safer).

Then I put the the scoop in the chuck and bore the inside to the required dimension. In this case it was 3” diameter x 1.532 deep. I drill a hole and then finish the entire inside with just a bedan.

After the inside is finished, I mount it on a jam chuck and turn off the bottom.

I cut off the nub that is left and sand the bottom with my 90 degree HF drill and Klingspor scalloped sanding discs.


I cut off the excess scrap on the band saw and sand the scoop to shape.

I finish the scoop with a food safe finish- like Belhandla salad bowl finish, or Butcher block finish or mineral oil.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!



17 comments so far

View Andy's profile

Andy

208 posts in 294 days


#1 posted 05-17-2016 01:12 AM

Nice to see the process. I was thinking of making some of these out of a piece of mesquite I have.

-- Andy Smith https://www.etsy.com/shop/xrayhardwoods

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17191 posts in 2573 days


#2 posted 05-17-2016 01:40 AM

Hi Andy. Mesquite make great scoops. I have made several of them in Az and use them for everything. Just be sure to leave long enough scrap so you don’t get any holes or dimples in the final piece.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Tooch's profile

Tooch

1352 posts in 1343 days


#3 posted 05-17-2016 02:34 AM

Wow Jim, that’s awesome. Not only a great project, but just a real nice documentation of how you do it.

Well done, sir.

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

View Bob Collins's profile

Bob Collins

2323 posts in 3151 days


#4 posted 05-17-2016 02:49 AM

Nice pictures showing the how to do them Jim, easy to follow instructions that should get some LJer’s having a go at these. 2 good looking scoops at the end. Thanks for sharing.

-- Bob C, Australia. I love sharing as long as it is not my tools

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9451 posts in 3519 days


#5 posted 05-17-2016 03:20 AM

Very COOL procedure / Project… What a Scoop!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5248 posts in 1510 days


#6 posted 05-17-2016 03:21 AM

Nice, understandable blog Jim. Maybe I can talk my wife into using a couple of these.
Your add on handles blended well into the cup.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Mark Wilson's profile (online now)

Mark Wilson

1764 posts in 530 days


#7 posted 05-17-2016 07:41 AM

Marvelous, Jim. Someone thinks you “added on” the handle. Methinks someone didn’t read the whole thing.

-- Mark

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8759 posts in 1307 days


#8 posted 05-17-2016 09:12 AM

Thanks for the tutorial, Jim. Pretty pair of scoops!

-- God bless, Candy

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17191 posts in 2573 days


#9 posted 05-17-2016 11:54 AM

Thanks Tooch, Bob, Joe, Dave, Mark and Candy!!

Someone asked for this a while back on another scoop and I finally had the time to document it all. I wanted to make sure I put in all the steps and all the tools involved so there is no doubt how to go about making one of these and it is pretty straightforward turning ( just don’t let you fingers cross into the spinning blur).

I remember when I was learning to turn, I would get so far on a piece and I got stuck on what to use to finish it. I would call my mentor, Dick Wilson , and he would give me these types of instructions. So, I don’t want anyone getting “stuck” making a scoop of this type. The order of things is very important so you don’t get ahead of yourself and find you turned the handle too deep or not deep enough so you have a lot of carving work. Also, on small scoops ,you don’t really need the counterweight but for the 1/2 cup and bigger I use them so there is not a lot of off center swinging mass when the handle gets real small.

Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!.............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Cliff 's profile

Cliff

904 posts in 1191 days


#10 posted 05-18-2016 10:46 AM

Hi Jim. Great presentation and really nice attractive scoops.

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17191 posts in 2573 days


#11 posted 05-18-2016 11:18 AM

Thanks, Cliff!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Roger's profile

Roger

19886 posts in 2271 days


#12 posted 05-18-2016 01:34 PM

Nice “how-to” Jim. Thnx for sharing the process

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17191 posts in 2573 days


#13 posted 05-18-2016 04:18 PM

Hi Roger. I like to share all my work!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21571 posts in 3318 days


#14 posted 05-24-2016 02:33 AM

Well done Jim, great blog

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17191 posts in 2573 days


#15 posted 05-24-2016 02:46 AM

Thanks, Tony!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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