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Turning a Wooden Scoop #1: How I turn a sccop on the lathe

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Blog entry by Jim Jakosh posted 06-27-2015 08:55 PM 2732 reads 11 times favorited 25 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Candy, this blog’s for you!!!!!!!!!!!
This is the process I use to turn a scoop from a wood blank on the lathe.
I start by defining the volume needed in the the scoop. The formula is Pi x R squared x depth

I planned on a 1/2 cup scoop and the volume of 4 oz is 7.218 cubic inches and I want the inside to be 2 5/8”
So the formula is 3.1416 x ( 1.312) squared x depth = 7.218. The depth figures out to be 1.33”

I start by drawing it out and then adding scrap wood in the areas for holding the part in the process. That will give me my overall blank size.

I chose this old Juniper log to cut it out of and start it on the band saw .

I layout the pattern on the block including the scrap areas and rough out the shape.

I put in the center holes for the turning axes and then take it to the lathe.

I start by turning the bottom to establish the outside finished diameter and add the spigot on for holding in a later step.


While turning it I discovered cracks near the base of the handle and wanted to repair them right away so I mixed up epoxy and sanding dust from the juniper to fill the cracked area. The moral of the story is don’t include the pith in a project like this if you can help it.


I turn that flush and then load it to turn the handle. The finished diameter has to be established before you turn the handle so you know where to stop the handle so it blends into the side of the scoop,


Then you use that spigot on the bottom to hold it to bore the inside. I drill it just short of the 1.33 depth and than remove all the material with a 3/8” bedan to get a square corner and flat bottom. Almost no sanding needed.

When the inside is done, I mount it on a jam chuck with white shelf liner material in between the parts and turn the bottom off and add some decorative grooves .


Now that the turning is done, the scrap has to be removed and the scoop needs to be sanded to shape.

A coat of salad bowl finish and it is ready to use.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!



25 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

11336 posts in 3217 days


#1 posted 06-27-2015 09:04 PM

Nice!
I’m always afraid I’ll beat my knuckles to death making one of these!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17145 posts in 2567 days


#2 posted 06-27-2015 09:17 PM

Hi Lew. You have to keep your wits about you when that thing is flying around. I moved the steady rest into the handle once when turning the bottom off. .I just heard the ticking and stopped it before it hit it too hard. The game would have been over then!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View John Stegall's profile

John Stegall

478 posts in 2978 days


#3 posted 06-27-2015 10:03 PM

Thanks for blogging this Jim. I am also going to tackle your trivet.

-- jstegall

View CFrye's profile (online now)

CFrye

8738 posts in 1302 days


#4 posted 06-27-2015 10:17 PM

Thanks for revealing your ‘secrets’, Jim! For now I’ll stick to the 2 piece construction (yes, I am a coward)!

-- God bless, Candy

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1469 days


#5 posted 06-27-2015 10:40 PM

Thanks Jim. Cool little scoop. A bit scary for a newbie, but I just might be brave (or stupid) enough to try it ! :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17145 posts in 2567 days


#6 posted 06-27-2015 11:22 PM

Thanks for looking!!Aw come on Candy, it is no big thing to make one. You just work on what is in front of you and let the rest of it fly in the back ground. I just looked on U tube and there are a lot of videos on making them but none use my method. This way takes no special tools- just use centers and chuck

Hi John. I can’t wait to see your trivet!

Hi Joe, you can do it . Just keep in front of the spinning background stuff and watch the tools support before turning on the lathe. That is the biggest concern for me. I kissed the handle once with my support!.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2461 posts in 1765 days


#7 posted 06-27-2015 11:40 PM

Awesome tutorial Jim. I will have to give this a go.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 638 days


#8 posted 06-28-2015 12:03 AM

As others have said, Thanks.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21562 posts in 3313 days


#9 posted 06-28-2015 12:45 AM

Great blog Jim and a nice job on the scoop.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View BobWemm's profile

BobWemm

1806 posts in 1388 days


#10 posted 06-28-2015 02:44 AM

That makes it look so simple.
Excellent info Jim.

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5221 posts in 1505 days


#11 posted 06-28-2015 03:00 AM

Thanks Jim. I see the trick of leaving on the extra wood on the cup portion for the center, then cutting it off later.
Great show and tell.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17145 posts in 2567 days


#12 posted 06-28-2015 03:48 AM

Thank you all for the nice comments. I hope this helps clear up any mystery to making these. You just do one part at a time. It did not take long once it was on the lathe. I was turning a taper on the Southbend lathe with the power feed on while making this one.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Rustic's profile

Rustic

3220 posts in 3058 days


#13 posted 06-28-2015 04:30 AM

nice blog this would be a nice demo at the guild

-- www.carvingandturningsbyrick.com, Rick Kruse, Grand Rapids, MI

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1353 posts in 1745 days


#14 posted 06-28-2015 04:48 AM

interesting procedure every well done

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2796 days


#15 posted 06-28-2015 07:16 AM

Great looking scoop Jim and a very well done tutorial, you should do more of them!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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