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Inserting shapes into wood #1: Inserting an already made shape

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Blog entry by Jim Jakosh posted 08-31-2013 07:20 PM 1713 reads 4 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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I have been thinking about this for a while now. I bought an inlay kit and have used it to do inserting with it , but you have to start with an outline pattern for the router bushing to follow to make the Object and make the Shaped hole for it. But what if you already have an object and you want to make a hole for it to fit exactly into. I finally figured out what I need to do that.
My object is another Corian Alien. It has all convex curves and no radius is smaller than 1/2” so this will work.

I started by mounting the object on a board that will be my outer template. I tried double faced tape and I did not trust it so I just glued the object to the wood with Tight Bond. Then I cut around it with the router and at this point you cannot vary from that edge at all or you will get gaps. I only went down about 3/16” deep.

I had a 1/4” straight router bit and a 1/2” bushing. in the router.

Then I cut the center out on the scroll saw leaving a little bit of the routed edge


and I cut it to shape all the way through with a router bit with a bearing on the end for tracing.


Then I changed the router bushing to 1” I had to make this one because the set I have only goes to 3/4”

I screwed the pattern to the board in which I want to insert the object

and I routed the pattern around it 3/16” deep

I cut out the center and routed it through as before

And the object is a press fit with absolutely no gaps any where

Now I have a way to drop any shape within reason into another surface.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!



16 comments so far

View wiswood2's profile

wiswood2

1123 posts in 2416 days


#1 posted 08-31-2013 07:36 PM

A lot of work, but it is very nice job.
Chuck

-- Chuck, wiswood2 www.wisconsinwoodchuck.com

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3644 posts in 560 days


#2 posted 08-31-2013 08:53 PM

Beautifully done Jim! Favoriting so I can try it out when I get a router set up! Thanks for sharing!

-- God bless, Candy

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5917 posts in 2149 days


#3 posted 08-31-2013 10:56 PM

Good thinkin’, Jim.
Thanks.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Roger's profile

Roger

15051 posts in 1524 days


#4 posted 08-31-2013 11:17 PM

Good stuff Jim. Lookin like Area 51.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11991 posts in 1826 days


#5 posted 08-31-2013 11:40 PM

Thanks for the nice comments.Ii hope this is helpful for someone else in the future.
I scratched my head for a long time trying to find the combination that would make a template and them come back and make the hole for the part and it works really nice!!!

As for my project using it. I moved the templates off the router table and the corian alien fell , hit the floor and broke in two pieces! What a bummer!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I am in the process of putting Humpty Dumpty together with Epoxy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5222 posts in 1518 days


#6 posted 09-01-2013 12:01 AM

I love the thought process Jim but you are really doing it the hard way. With a simple pin router that you can make in an hour you could cut the hole perfectly using the alien as the template. Just set up with the pin offset to the edge of the router bit and do all your cutting on that side of the pin.
One cut, no wasted material.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11991 posts in 1826 days


#7 posted 09-01-2013 01:02 AM

Well I’ll be! I have been trying to find a good way to do this for a long time. I don’t have a pin router, but I could make one up. I’ll have to try that next. Thanks Jim

ps.It seems that you have to be exactly square or opposite to the pin or the cut might get a little wider or narrower with an off set situation. Is that right??

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4826 posts in 1013 days


#8 posted 09-01-2013 01:39 AM

Although I don’t know about a pin router and don’t have a Shop Smith, I like your concept and method for building variou routing jigs—I’ve used this approach for years and still use it. It works well for what I want and I’ve been pleased.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View MarkTheFiddler's profile (online now)

MarkTheFiddler

1846 posts in 909 days


#9 posted 09-01-2013 02:19 AM

Lord man! What can’t you do?

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5222 posts in 1518 days


#10 posted 09-01-2013 02:54 AM

Yes Jim, I would offset exactly to the front and then make sure that the piece was rotated so as always to be cutting right at the front. It sounds tricky but it is really very easy.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11991 posts in 1826 days


#11 posted 09-01-2013 11:46 AM

HI Paul, excuse my backward brain but I’m having trouble seeing what is happening here with your pin router set up. The router is in the bottom and the pin is in the chuck on top, but yet it looks like the routing of the material is taking place on the top? Is that router bit cutting all the way through that bottom piece of material?

I went over this in my head last night and I’m stuck!

For my situation where I want to make a hole to fit the part, using my router table, if I built a frame over the top to house the pin, I don’t have a way to raise the router into the work, once I have it laying on the table and against the pin. Do you have a way to raise that trim router from below? My adjustment wheel would be covered up by the wood. With the plunge router , I set the bushing to the work, drop the router in, take the cut and back it out. I’d build a steel frame for a pin router if I could use the existing table.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5222 posts in 1518 days


#12 posted 09-01-2013 02:14 PM

What you describe is the way commercially available pin routers work, as a pin carrying arm over a standard router table. The drill press is just my solution.
What you are seeing in my photos is a female pattern on top and the piece being cut on the bottom. To do what you are doing (male pattern) you would offset the pin. Obviously female patterns are easier but it works either way. Im not usually routing very thick stock and its easy to hold the piece up off the table, start the router, and then lower the piece, maintaining contact with the pin. For thicker stock it would be trickier but not that bad. Someone with your problem solving mind would figure out a way pretty quickly … maybe in steps with some shims???

The shots in this blog entry may show the pin router better.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11991 posts in 1826 days


#13 posted 09-01-2013 02:55 PM

Oh, Okay, I see what is does. That is typical pin routing and I do have a drawing somewhere to make one, but again it would be shape for shape not a “negative” or a hole for the shape.

i’ll have to think on it more. I always like to make things easier and you’ve got me going now, Paul.. I have an itch for a CNC router which would do it, but I’m too analog! I’ll be dead before the learning curve is reached!!!!!!!!

Have a great weekend. ....................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19586 posts in 2571 days


#14 posted 09-02-2013 01:26 AM

Nice one Jim.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3644 posts in 560 days


#15 posted 09-02-2013 03:05 AM

Hey Jim, how’s Humpty Dumpty?

-- God bless, Candy

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