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Stabilizing punky and end grain wood

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Blog entry by Jim Jakosh posted 05-20-2012 09:12 PM 2555 reads 7 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

At our last guild meeting we had a meeting in my shop until almost midnight and I learned something new before the day ended from a couple of experienced turners. When you have end grain that will not stop tearing out in the lathe or real punky wood that may crumble when you hit it, you can stabilize it using Minwax Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner. You rough turn the bowl to a 1” or less wall . Then submerge the bowl in it for an hour or fill the inside of it and wait until you see it come all the way through to the outside. It takes a quart or more to do it but you can use over what did not soak in. Then let the bowl dry for at least a week before finish turning. I have often tried to fill bad areas with epoxy but wind up turning it all away to no advantage. This way the wood is stable all the way through .

I have two bowls in it right now and will prove it out in a week!......................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!



12 comments so far

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1640 days


#1 posted 05-20-2012 11:27 PM

I have used that stuff before.. with good luck!

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Jim Jakosh's profile (online now)

Jim Jakosh

11452 posts in 1759 days


#2 posted 05-20-2012 11:54 PM

That is good to know, Lis. You are the third supporter!!
I did the two bowls and used less than a half pint!
............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View ShopTinker's profile

ShopTinker

878 posts in 1422 days


#3 posted 05-21-2012 12:15 AM

That sounds like what I need to treat my 100+ year old wood screw vice. The wood threads are really soft so I don”t use it much and when I do it’s done gently. Thanks for the tip.

-- Dan - Valparaiso, Indiana, "A smart man changes his mind, a fool never does."

View TurnTurnTurn's profile

TurnTurnTurn

585 posts in 1763 days


#4 posted 05-21-2012 12:58 AM

Let us know the results. Thx for sharing.

-- TurnTurnTurn

View sedcokid's profile

sedcokid

2675 posts in 2252 days


#5 posted 05-21-2012 01:20 AM

Jim, Sounds like a great tip. Will be interesting to see and hear your findings.

Thanks for sharing!

-- Chuck Emery, Michigan,

View Roger's profile

Roger

14566 posts in 1458 days


#6 posted 05-21-2012 02:29 AM

Gr8 information. Thnx for the tip

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Woodstock's profile

Woodstock

234 posts in 1942 days


#7 posted 05-21-2012 06:19 PM

Good timing for posting this as I am i the middle of cutting up two pickup loads of silver maple that was harvested last season that already had a lot of spalting / punky wood before it was removed from someones front yard and eventually will be cut up into turning blanks.

This sounds promising, but in doing a bit of research online I have a additional question.

Which one? The local borg lists a oil base (red label) and a water base (cream color label) pre-stain conditioner by Minwax. I’m guessing the water based version would be absorbed deeper. Does anyone know?

-Dave

-- I'm not old. Just "well seasoned".

View Jim Jakosh's profile (online now)

Jim Jakosh

11452 posts in 1759 days


#8 posted 05-21-2012 08:47 PM

I was told to use the oil based stabilizer. I poured in in the bowl and filled it to the brim. In less than an hour it was to the outside of the bowl with a 3/4” wall. It goes all the way through if you soak it. I can turn it on the 27th…...............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1743 days


#9 posted 05-29-2012 11:50 AM

This can be great for restore, you got me thinking.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Jim Jakosh's profile (online now)

Jim Jakosh

11452 posts in 1759 days


#10 posted 06-06-2012 01:37 AM

Well I tried 2 of the bowls and the pre stain conditioner did help clean up the turning of the end grain. The punky stuff still was wide open and I took it off and filled it with 5 minute epoxy and sawdust. I heard this week end at the art festival that black CA glue works good for filling cracks and voids. I will try that too so I can save this piece of great spalted beechwood I have yet to finish. You can get that CA glue at Woodcraft.
..............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7718 posts in 2706 days


#11 posted 06-06-2012 03:38 AM

Jim,
Here is The Best place to get CA glue, in my experience.

They are good! Quality… Prices… Delivery… 2nd to none… The Best! IMHO

I have used the Thin to treat the end grain… prior to routing the edge…
... has worked beautifully!

I hope this helps you… You have sure helped US!

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Jim Jakosh's profile (online now)

Jim Jakosh

11452 posts in 1759 days


#12 posted 06-06-2012 01:25 PM

Thanks, Joe. I ‘ll be getting some there! Prices are right!!
Thanks, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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