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Build Blogs #2: Making A Solid Oak Picture Frame

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Blog entry by Jerry posted 02-19-2017 04:12 AM 3927 reads 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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In this video I take some Oak stock that I previously prepared and make a picture frame. Repetitive parts have been edited out. Total real time to make this was about one hour start to finish, not including the 30 minutes clamping time.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/



17 comments so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

1449 posts in 1620 days


#1 posted 02-19-2017 06:24 AM

Hey never got to see the Picture? Why make a frame if there is nothing to put into it.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#2 posted 02-19-2017 08:14 AM



Hey never got to see the Picture? Why make a frame if there is nothing to put into it.

- Andre

Hey Andre,
You always make me smile, how’s this for a picture!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1575 posts in 2577 days


#3 posted 02-20-2017 01:59 AM

Jerry, if I may, some advice from a one time professional picture framer ? First of all, I really like the frame. The wood does a good job of being in one with the bird (duck ?), as the colors and grain are exceptional for matching the coloring on this subject. Now, for the professional part (and to others who do their own framing) – when measuring / cutting the mat add 1/2” to the bottom of the mat, i.e., if you want the mat size to be 16×20, with a 4” opening around the subject the mat size would be 16×20-1/2 overall, and the inside measurement of the mat would be 14×16. I know this sounds strange but, your eyes will not see it, and it will add more depth to the framing. Then you cut the frame to size of the mat. When using a mat, and you want the subject to last a lifetime, without turning brown, use a 100% acid free rag mat and backing. It’s also a good idea to cover the rabbit of the frame with acid free vinyl tape to prevent the tannin in the wood from leaching on to the mat. You can get the rag mat, backing, and vinyl tape at Michaels Craft Supplies.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected !

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#4 posted 02-20-2017 03:18 AM



Jerry, if I may, some advice from a one time professional picture framer ? First of all, I really like the frame. The wood does a good job of being in one with the bird (duck ?), as the colors and grain are exceptional for matching the coloring on this subject. Now, for the professional part (and to others who do their own framing) – when measuring / cutting the mat add 1/2” to the bottom of the mat, i.e., if you want the mat size to be 16×20, with a 4” opening around the subject the mat size would be 16×20-1/2 overall, and the inside measurement of the mat would be 14×16. I know this sounds strange but, your eyes will not see it, and it will add more depth to the framing. Then you cut the frame to size of the mat. When using a mat, and you want the subject to last a lifetime, without turning brown, use a 100% acid free rag mat and backing. It s also a good idea to cover the rabbit of the frame with acid free vinyl tape to prevent the tannin in the wood from leaching on to the mat. You can get the rag mat, backing, and vinyl tape at Michaels Craft Supplies.

- Jimbo4

That is REALLY useful information, thanks for taking the time to instruct me.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

6743 posts in 1857 days


#5 posted 02-20-2017 03:33 AM

Thanks for taking us through with the video Jerry. Always helpful when making frames.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#6 posted 02-20-2017 04:00 AM



Thanks for taking us through with the video Jerry. Always helpful when making frames.

- doubleDD

Quite welcome sir, thanks for looking.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1575 posts in 2577 days


#7 posted 02-20-2017 04:23 AM

Jerry, you’re quite welcome, although it wasn’t really an instructional tidbit, just how the professionals would frame a piece of fine art. When I was a framer, I considered all pieces of art to be fine, whether they were or not. I would always ask the customer how they wanted it to be framed, conservatory – rag with UV inhibited glass (expensive), or standard – (less expensive). I was always surprised how many chose conservatory framing.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected !

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6391 posts in 3181 days


#8 posted 02-20-2017 07:01 AM

As you have shown, making frames is similar to making a box, both look deceptively easy when opposite is more realistic.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#9 posted 02-20-2017 07:49 AM



Jerry, you re quite welcome, although it wasn t really an instructional tidbit, just how the professionals would frame a piece of fine art. When I was a framer, I considered all pieces of art to be fine, whether they were or not. I would always ask the customer how they wanted it to be framed, conservatory – rag with UV inhibited glass (expensive), or standard – (less expensive). I was always surprised how many chose conservatory framing.

- Jimbo4

This is all such great information and I’m very grateful for it. I’m just struggling to make nice things out of wood, and the expertise you have offered just helps me to do better.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#10 posted 02-20-2017 07:54 AM



As you have shown, making frames is similar to making a box, both look deceptively easy when opposite is more realistic.

- oldnovice

You know, when I first started woodworking, my first naive thought was, ” I think I’ll start off with boxes before I move on to the hard stuff.” I now know that all the professional box makers out there are laughing their collective donkeys off at that sentiment.

Boxes have taught me accuracy, joinery, patience, standards of quality, and to buy way more wood than you thought you needed.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Roger's profile

Roger

20873 posts in 2618 days


#11 posted 02-20-2017 03:39 PM

Very good Jerry.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5624 posts in 2961 days


#12 posted 02-21-2017 11:33 PM

A little late to the party on this one, but I enjoyed the video!

Question for you, though: When you cut the 45 degree miters on your tablesaw sled, how did you keep the parts matching sizes? You used a stopblock when cutting them to length, but I didn’t see a stopblock system for the miter cuts.

Thanks for posting this!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#13 posted 02-22-2017 12:02 AM


A little late to the party on this one, but I enjoyed the video!

Question for you, though: When you cut the 45 degree miters on your tablesaw sled, how did you keep the parts matching sizes? You used a stopblock when cutting them to length, but I didn t see a stopblock system for the miter cuts.

Thanks for posting this!

- Mean_Dean

there is a 45 degree piece of Baltic birch ply attached to the back of the sled. To position it perfectly I stick the corner of one of the frame pieces into the sled exit slot, then I push the ply guide up against the back of the frame piece until they lock into position, then I carefully block the guide at the back side and on top to keep it in place.

I made a quick little video for you here

https://youtu.be/VnXlh38WMP8

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5624 posts in 2961 days


#14 posted 02-22-2017 02:38 AM

Hey Jerry, you didn’t have to go to all that trouble to make my video, but I do appreciate it!

So I see what you’re doing, now. You use the saw kerf to register the workpiece, and all the rest of the blocks and guides just make sure it’s lined up correctly.

I’m still curious though: have you checked your frames for square during your dry-fit? I’m wondering if any error creeps in, or if they’re perfectly square—or if it really matters.

Sorry for all the questions—it’s just that I’ve been a rigid adherent of using stopblocks, and other means of securing workpieces so that they’re all exactly the same length. And I’m curious about other’s methods and practices, and how they do things. I figure that the more I can learn, the better!

Thanks again.

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2430 posts in 1462 days


#15 posted 02-22-2017 03:06 AM


Hey Jerry, you didn t have to go to all that trouble to make my video, but I do appreciate it!

So I see what you re doing, now. You use the saw kerf to register the workpiece, and all the rest of the blocks and guides just make sure it s lined up correctly.

I m still curious though: have you checked your frames for square during your dry-fit? I m wondering if any error creeps in, or if they re perfectly square—or if it really matters.

Sorry for all the questions—it s just that I ve been a rigid adherent of using stopblocks, and other means of securing workpieces so that they re all exactly the same length. And I m curious about other s methods and practices, and how they do things. I figure that the more I can learn, the better!

Thanks again.

- Mean_Dean

Dean, there are three stop blocks if you think about it.

Look at the video, the miter guide is blocked in two places once it’s positioned, the fence acts as a third block. Every frame I’ve made with this has come out absolutely perfect.

BTW, I’ve added annotations to that video to explain more completely.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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