LumberJocks

Building a model of an eighteenth century man of war #1

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by ScaleShipWright posted 03-31-2013 06:55 PM 1883 reads 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Part 1: Intro

the building of this ship model kept me busy in the last 12 years (mostly during week ends). The subject is a British sailing ship of the line, called Bellona (name of the Roman goddess of war), launched in 1760.
The project is not too far from completion, considering that I will not make masting and rigging.
I will start from the current state of construction, to see more of earlier stages one can check my web site at:

www.arsenalotto.it

Here are a couple of photos:

Some more technical notes: the model is built (loosely) according to the so called “Navy Board” style, partially omitting the planking of the hull and on the decks, to allow inspection of the internal structure. The framing is stylized; in real ships the ribs formed an almost uninterrupted wooden wall.
The scale is 1:72 or 1/6th of an inch per foot and is about 80 cm long (31 1/2 inches).

-- God exists... But relax, He's not you!



10 comments so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5320 posts in 1552 days


#1 posted 03-31-2013 09:20 PM

Beautiful work. Complimenti signore !

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View ScaleShipWright's profile

ScaleShipWright

250 posts in 640 days


#2 posted 03-31-2013 09:23 PM

Thanks my full size colleague!

Just spotted your website, looks awesome.

-- God exists... But relax, He's not you!

View jap's profile

jap

1240 posts in 809 days


#3 posted 04-01-2013 02:10 AM

great job

-- Joel

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

15538 posts in 1093 days


#4 posted 04-01-2013 09:00 AM

Remarkable work. I have eye strain just looking at the pictures.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Jim Rowe's profile

Jim Rowe

614 posts in 1067 days


#5 posted 04-01-2013 09:31 AM

Beautiful craftsmanship. This is maritime museum quality! Did you develop your own plans or did you have access to original naval drawings?
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View ScaleShipWright's profile

ScaleShipWright

250 posts in 640 days


#6 posted 04-01-2013 11:44 AM

Thank you all for the comments. You are too generous, if you search through the web you are going to find much better works.

Jim, I have developed the plans from original Admiralty draughts preserved in the National Maritime Museum – Greenwich UK; their site is also quite interesting:

http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections.htm

I also have al lot of documentation reference (books, articles, photos…)

-- God exists... But relax, He's not you!

View Jim Rowe's profile

Jim Rowe

614 posts in 1067 days


#7 posted 04-01-2013 12:46 PM

I have seen many of their models and am always amazed at the skill with which they were made so many years ago when hand tools were the only tools. In my youth, a long time ago, I was given a copy of Ships in Miniature by Lloyd McCaffrey. Some of the examples and techniques show in there are just incredible. He uses dentist drills and burrs for a lot of his work. I am assuming that you also use similar techniques.
Keep posting the progress.
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16043 posts in 1621 days


#8 posted 04-01-2013 12:52 PM

This is superb and the detail is amazing.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Dakkar's profile

Dakkar

297 posts in 682 days


#9 posted 04-01-2013 02:40 PM

That’s magnificent. Your long work really shows. It’s almost a shame to cover that beautiful framework.

View ScaleShipWright's profile

ScaleShipWright

250 posts in 640 days


#10 posted 04-01-2013 04:15 PM

Thanks again guys

Charles, I really like your web site, beautiful tools and works there!

In my youth, a long time ago, I was given a copy of Ships in Miniature by Lloyd McCaffrey. Some of the examples and techniques show in there are just incredible. He uses dentist drills and burrs for a lot of his work. I am assuming that you also use similar techniques.

I have seen some works of Loyd McCaffery and I have to say he’s one of the most talented and skilled ship modeler; most of his models are made in very extreme scales (like 1:192) and has developed very personal techniques to achieve that level of detail. I have some small scale power and hand tools, but also use regular size tools for some tasks, like chisels for paring or razor and copying saws. Much work is devoted to resize scale lumber, since I like to collect and season wood for my projects.

-- God exists... But relax, He's not you!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase