LumberJocks

Sauce's adventures in woodworking #2: The plane! The plane!

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by SauceMan posted 05-29-2017 07:36 PM 1457 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: I may make 1000 dovetail joints in my lifetime Part 2 of Sauce's adventures in woodworking series no next part

I’ll keep this short and sweet.

When people say brand new planes need a lot of work, they mean it.

For me, I had a small plane and bought a bigger (#4) one recently. The small one had suddenly “clicked” and started working for me. The #4 didn’t work no matter how I adjusted the blades. I thought I went too cheap and bought junk. Turns out, I had a servicable plane, just needed to show it some love.

First, put the bevel of the iron (the iron is the blade) in the right place, and don’t be a moron like me. Read the directions, line it up right, otherwise it will just wedge itself into the wood constantly and make you hate life.

Second, it really does help flatten the bottom of a plane. It seems a little counterintuitive, because you think you’re buying a plane for being flat, but they just aren’t so out of the box.

Take a look at the bottom of my plane after one hour on putting it across sandpaper:

The rough looking part are high spots. High means if you put the plane right-side up on the ground, that part is too high to touch the ground (or your piece of wood). So as you can see in the case of my plane, it has a couple of high spots, with the outer edges all lower. So basically the whole thing is cup shaped. If it’s not clear enough, the rougher part that is circled looks like that from the factory. The shinier part is the part that I actually sanded down.

I stopped there after about an hour of work. I started with 220 grit sandpaper, but then actually dropped to 100 grit because I didn’t want to be there all day. It seemed like with the 220 it was taking forever to smoothen, so I sped it up. I’m hoping someone will tell me that I did it wrong and explain why. I had watched a video of someone who set the same plane up (lucky!) and he used 320 grit. I’d be there ALL DAY if I used something that fine.

Also, the iron (blade) was just not sharp enough. So I took it to my polishing stones (3000 & 8000 grit) and tried to sharpen it a bit. I don’t have super duper fine (> 8000) nor leather to do the finishing, but I left it at that. Then, I took some time to adjust the height of the blade on either side.

Here’s a shaving that came out of my plane:

I’m so much more satisfied with these results! Sure, the shaving isn’t the width of the blade, but that’s because the surface I was shaving wasn’t completely flat. Now that I have a hand plane I can use to plane things down, I think I’m going to use that when jointing pieces that are slightly wider than my 6” jointer. I had pieces that were 6.5”-8” wide, and doing 6” on the jointer then hand planing the remaining part after every couple of passes made very quick work of the jointing process! No funny jigs or sleds needed to use my thickness planer to complete the jointing any more.

Sauce



3 comments so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7956 posts in 1269 days


#1 posted 05-29-2017 08:05 PM

Good stuff. Though you could use a #4 for some smaller projects I’d recommend a #5 at least.

A vintage 4 for the same price would be a drastic improvement I think. Without a tight mouth a cap iron is critical to prevent tearout. There are many other benefits as well.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View SauceMan's profile

SauceMan

35 posts in 192 days


#2 posted 05-29-2017 08:12 PM



Good stuff. Though you could use a #4 for some smaller projects I d recommend a #5 at least.

A vintage 4 for the same price would be a drastic improvement I think. Without a tight mouth a cap iron is critical to prevent tearout. There are many other benefits as well.

Hey, I’ll keep an eye out for a #5. I didn’t know how much I wanted to invest in hand tools, but I’m seeing that a plane is useful.

This plane above came in at under $20 shipped. Think I’ll be able to get one in that ballpark? Now that I know more about planes and a bit about how to service / restore them, I’ll give the used planes on Craigslist a closer look.

Sauce

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13719 posts in 3880 days


#3 posted 05-30-2017 01:51 PM

You can find them for under $20 at flea markets and such. I would suggest an earlier plane such as a Stanley Bailey style plane. Modern planes can be a pain to get working correctly.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com