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Installing the Delta T2 on my 10in Craftsman Saw

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Blog entry by Sammy posted 01-18-2008 04:08 AM 9970 reads 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

After reading that another member had successfully installed a Delta T2 fence on his 1952 Craftsman table saw, I thought wow I’ve been looking at an aftermarket fences for quite a while and this Delta T2 seems to fit the bill perfectly (i.e. inexpensive and Biesemeyer like in construction) Well now the fun begins. I’ve never done this before and no doubt I will need to take my time. I’ll start uploading pics shortly for input and hopefully, with some help, I’ll be able to use my saw again without having to measure, measure, measure, cut, then swear.

-- Sammy, Pittsburgh PA



8 comments so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3283 days


#1 posted 01-18-2008 02:31 PM

Good luck Sammy.

After reading Jamie’s post and looking at other reviews I tried the same thing on my Craftsman. The T2 instructions are designed for installation on a Delta saw so you have to wing it. I had to drill holes in the wings to install the fence as I couldn’t get the angle iron to line up with the existing holes. I installed the supporting angle irons level with the table saw surface. When the front and back angle irons were installed the fence sat proud of the table by about 5/8”. In looking at the saw I only had about 1 1/4” of metal to work with on the wings so lowering the fence level to level it with the table would have entailed adding another piece of angle iron support to the wings before re-installing the fence (and drilling more holes in the wings). This led me to question whether the bolt heads supporting the angle iron additions would interfere with the angle irons for the fence. I finally gave up and re-installed my original fence and returned the T2 to Lowe’s.

I could have added a plywood face to the fence to correct the original installation but that would have meant drilling into the fence since it doesn’t have any T slots and I didn’t want to do that. Besides I question how stable that set-up would have been anyway.

Good luck. Let me know how it comes out.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Sammy's profile

Sammy

14 posts in 3243 days


#2 posted 01-18-2008 07:03 PM

I’ve got about 1 1/2” to work with which should be fine. A rought test with the fence and rails shows that I should be able to drill holes in the supporting front rail to get the results I need. Next step is to work with the horizontal placement to ensure the measuring tape aligns property. My saw model is 315.228390 for reference. It measures 44” length and 27” width without the previous rails. I’ll be posting step by step pictures as I go.

-- Sammy, Pittsburgh PA

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3283 days


#3 posted 01-18-2008 07:24 PM

Mine is 315.228310 so they aren’t that much different. In fact the front rails have the same part number. If yours goes ok I may give it another shot but then again if that is successful I would not have a reason to plead for a new sawstop.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Sammy's profile

Sammy

14 posts in 3243 days


#4 posted 01-19-2008 04:38 AM

Here’s a pic of the saw front face prior to install. I’ve been dry fitting the fences using saw horses, clamps, and bolting at least one hole to each rail to get an idea of the veritical fit and how the fence will ride. Next I’ll be researching to see about the horizontal fit. Luckily I can go back to lowes with a camera and tape measure to get some ideas. The existing holes are 7/16” from the bottom of the table to the center of the hole and 1 1/16” from the top. Dry fitting the rails this seems to be the right veritical height. I’m going to drill holes in the rails in stead of the other way around as this seems to be the easiest thing to do.

Before Install

-- Sammy, Pittsburgh PA

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Sammy

14 posts in 3243 days


#5 posted 01-19-2008 11:26 PM

Ok so I’ve started the process. I measure about million times, dry fit, and check and rechecked. I took Jamie’s advice and first put the fence and guide tube together and marked zero on the front rail:

Photobucket

I then transferred this mark to the back rail making sure the back and front rails were aligned end to end:

Photobucket

I then place the fence on the table making sure it was square to the table and butted up against the raised blade. I also checked to see if the blade was square to the miter gage slots just to be certain. I then marked and drew a line across the table where the zero sight reference point was located on the fence.

Photobucket

After trial and error I found that placing the rail about 3/8” down from the lip of the top of the table gave me good clearance on the fence (about 1/16”). Coicidentally this was also the height of my prior fence so there was a shadow line for me to follow which made it a bit easier.

I then clamped the front fence and worked it until I got it into position to mark the holes for drilling. As with Jamie’s installation I noticed that the holes I would drill were slightly higher than the existing holes on the fence.

So I took a deep breath and drilled the holes with a 7/16” bit. I placed some cribbing underneath so if I dropped the rail it wouldn’t go crashing to the ground. As you can see below the drilled holes turned out well. In the picture they are loose fit as I still need to counter bore so the screws will be flush with the table.

Photobucket

I decided not to drill hole past the table top proper for the extension tables since I am going to replace them as they are a bit flimsy and have a tendency to get out of level all the time. Next I’ll attached the back fence and hope for the best. This is a fun project and I can’t wait to see how it turns out. This makes me really wonder why Sears has not attempted to build and sell upgrade fences. For certain this is not something that is out of the box but the Delta Fence does allow for some tweaking with regard to the fence faces and the measuring gage so it’s no that bad if you take your time. One thing to note is that this fence requires you to have at least 1 ½” of table face material to work with.

-- Sammy, Pittsburgh PA

View Sammy's profile

Sammy

14 posts in 3243 days


#6 posted 01-21-2008 04:59 PM

After some trial and error I’ve counter sunk the holes for flush mounting of the front rail. Next step is to position the rear rail. I’ll clamp that on referencing my zero mark made previously. I’ll adjust the rail up and down, while the fence is on the table, to try and achieve 1/32” to 1/16” clearance between the fence and table. I may need to adjust the fence face a bit to get this. Once I have everything up and running I’ll post all the details with pictures.

-- Sammy, Pittsburgh PA

View FloidM's profile

FloidM

12 posts in 2474 days


#7 posted 03-05-2010 11:49 AM

so how did it turn out, i’m inheriting the same saw from my dad, he bought a grizzly, any way, i hate using the thing mostly because of the fence and i’d like to give this a try. any pointers would be great

View Sammy's profile

Sammy

14 posts in 3243 days


#8 posted 03-05-2010 11:28 PM

Turned out great. Just take your time and measure carefully. Recheck each time and move slowly. You only get one chance so spend time clamping the guide rails to the saw to see how they look, their placement, etc. Other than that just try and have fun.

-- Sammy, Pittsburgh PA

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