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Who Was George Hepplewhite

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 05-26-2018 08:35 PM 347 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

George Hepplewhite was born on… let us just say at some time during the first half of the eighteenth century in… well, no one knows just where. According to some sources, he served his apprenticeship with Gillows of Lancaster and London, but the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography is even skeptical about this. Purportedly he based himself in London, where he carried… - Continue Reading -

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  https://ronaylor.wordpress.com



4 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2636 posts in 2213 days


#1 posted 05-26-2018 09:54 PM

Nice reading, very interesting.
As “they always say” behind every great man ….........., so lets give Alice her due credit.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3670 days


#2 posted 05-26-2018 10:16 PM

I had read the pieces broke apart due to fragile
proportions and so didn’t survive. The theory
that “he” was a designer only and not a maker
is certainly interesting.

I was once asked to repair an early 19th century
chair. It had been poorly repaired with screws
before, as you might expect. I got it so it looked
a little better but it was still not sturdy enough
for sitting on. I don’t think anybody much cared
about preserving old furniture before the 20th
century.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2631 posts in 669 days


#3 posted 05-27-2018 01:56 PM



Nice reading, very interesting.
As “they always say” behind every great man ….........., so lets give Alice her due credit.

- Oldtool


Thanks, Tom.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  https://ronaylor.wordpress.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2631 posts in 669 days


#4 posted 05-27-2018 01:58 PM



I had read the pieces broke apart due to fragile
proportions and so didn t survive. The theory
that “he” was a designer only and not a maker
is certainly interesting.

I was once asked to repair an early 19th century
chair. It had been poorly repaired with screws
before, as you might expect. I got it so it looked
a little better but it was still not sturdy enough
for sitting on. I don t think anybody much cared
about preserving old furniture before the 20th
century.

- Loren


I find that interesting given that the Hepplewhite designs are copied so much.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  https://ronaylor.wordpress.com

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