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• Two-Tier Side Table #4: Hepplewhite Visits Plymouth

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 05-01-2018 10:46 PM 1177 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Selecting Stock Part 4 of • Two-Tier Side Table series Part 5: I Can't Carve »

Hepplewhite Visits Plymouth –
 
I have all the ash for the frame roughed out and partially jointed. I’ll tackle the shelf and top when the time comes. Before I cut mortise and tenon joints and assemble the frame ...
 
                
 
… I going to try my hand at a bit of carving! Seventeenth-Century New England carving to be more specific. I’ve been studying Peter Follansbee’s work for quite some time, and thought I’d dress-up this Hepplewhite-ish  two-tier table just a bit.
 
                
 
I’ll enhanced the bottom edge of the aprons with a zig-zag decoration, chopping with a chisel …
 
                
 
… and I’m hoping for carved lunettes akin to one by William Savell Sr (1590s-1669) on a joined chest at the Smithsonian Institute, Washington , DC, at the sides of the second tier. This photo is from Peter Follansbee’s blog, 1/18/18, Lots of oak furniture in New York this week.
 

 
I can only pray that my rough chalk lay-out ends up looking as good … LOL!
 
                
 
Well … you know where I’ll be for a few weeks! Thanks for looking, more to come. As always, all comments and/or questions welcomed.

Follow my progress with the links below.
Two-Tier Side Table #1 – Realization
Two-Tier Side Table #2 – Playing Around in Paint
Two-Tier Side Table #3 – Selecting Stock
Two-Tier Side Table #4 – Hepplewhite Visits Plymouth
Two-Tier Side Table #5 – I Can't Carve
Two-Tier Side Table #6 – Zig-Zags
Two-Tier Side Table #7 – My Very First Lunette
Two-Tier Side Table #8 – Some Assembly Required

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



8 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2619 posts in 2187 days


#1 posted 05-01-2018 11:01 PM

New ventures into woodworking – carving. Trying new methods of work, attempting new skills – that’s what I like about woodworking, always something new to learn. I’m sure you’ll enjoy the experience, what’s not to like.
The way I look at new attempts with skills, the irregularities and slight imperfections are there to prove it’s handmade.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2604 posts in 644 days


#2 posted 05-01-2018 11:07 PM


New ventures into woodworking – carving. Trying new methods of work, attempting new skills – that s what I like about woodworking, always something new to learn. I m sure you ll enjoy the experience, what s not to like.
The way I look at new attempts with skills, the irregularities and slight imperfections are there to prove it s handmade.

- Oldtool


Thanks, Tom. There is no doubt this table will look handmade  … especially with me trying to duplicate this caring on four panels … with one being a drawer front!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2148 posts in 579 days


#3 posted 05-01-2018 11:08 PM

I’m looking forward to see what you come up with, Ron. I figured you had something cooking, and it looks like a good plan.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2604 posts in 644 days


#4 posted 05-01-2018 11:53 PM



I’m looking forward to see what you come up with, Ron. I figured you had something cooking, and it looks like a good plan.

- Dave Polaschek


Thanks, Dave. This should be fun!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

671 posts in 537 days


#5 posted 05-02-2018 09:34 AM

Wow, carving too. There’s no end to the skills on display here. Your blogs are always an adventure and very fascinating for this electron killing woodworker….....Thanks for sharing

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2604 posts in 644 days


#6 posted 05-02-2018 10:11 AM



Wow, carving too. There s no end to the skills on display here. Your blogs are always an adventure and very fascinating for this electron killing woodworker….....Thanks for sharing

- Kelster58


Thanks, Kelly. Carving is uncharted territory for me. I hope I can pull it off … LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

7382 posts in 2040 days


#7 posted 05-02-2018 12:00 PM

Looks good. I give you much credit taking on carving. That hasn’t made my list yet.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2604 posts in 644 days


#8 posted 05-02-2018 12:08 PM



Looks good. I give you much credit taking on carving. That hasn’t made my list yet.

- doubleDD


Thanks, Dave! I just hope my very inexpensive carving tools are up to the task.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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