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• Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #4: Side Rails and a Test Drive

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 04-15-2018 11:28 PM 1724 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Cart Before the Horse Part 4 of • Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw series no next part

Side Rails and a Test Drive –
 
After reorienting the horse and the cart, I used my tenoning clamp & chairmarker's tenon saw ...
 

 
… to create a tenon at one end of each of the two 3/4” x 1” cherry side rails.
 

 
I then cut 3/8” x 3/4” x 1-3/8” through mortises in the handles …
 

 
... to accept the side rails.
 
               
 
After a quick check for squareness …
 

 
I assembled one end of the saw and attached the blade …
 

 
… It was then that I was able to determine the length of the side rails to be 34”.
 

 
After cutting and fitting the last two through mortise and tenon joints, I assembled the saw and gave it a test drive.
 
               
 
Weighting in at just shy of three pounds … she works for me!
 
               
 
After trimming the tenons, some sanding, and perhaps a lark’s tongue or two, I’ll apply some boiled linseed oil and beeswax. Click here to see the completed saw.
 
Thanks for looking. As always, all comments and/or questions welcomed.
 
Follow my progress with the links below.
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #1: The Want
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #2: Handles
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #3: Cart Before the Horse
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #4: Side Rails and a Test Drive
 



14 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2275 posts in 635 days


#1 posted 04-15-2018 11:45 PM

Looks like that’ll do the job! Maybe scrolls in the ends of the handles too? Or would that be too fancy?

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

9772 posts in 2504 days


#2 posted 04-16-2018 12:09 AM

And Ron for the win! Did you make a few extras for your friends? :-)

Do you have to use any downward force?

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2659 posts in 2244 days


#3 posted 04-16-2018 12:30 AM

Great work, looks like a beautiful saw to use. Can I borrow it?

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2275 posts in 635 days


#4 posted 04-16-2018 12:49 AM

Sounds like mine is heavier than Ron’s, Kevin, but I definitely don’t have to use any downward force. Just push and pull and the weight of the saw pulls it through the wood.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

9772 posts in 2504 days


#5 posted 04-16-2018 01:03 AM

Thanks Dave.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

175 posts in 861 days


#6 posted 04-16-2018 01:08 AM

Nice work, Ron! I’m curious to hear more about how well it works, especially in wider material. My frame saw is quite a bit bigger — 4’ blade and metal hardware from Blackburn — but also weighs quite a bit more, I’m sure.

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

670 posts in 593 days


#7 posted 04-16-2018 01:38 AM

Looks like a nice tool…GREAT job!

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

20462 posts in 2736 days


#8 posted 04-16-2018 05:32 AM

Looks great! A wee bit big for my shop, though.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 701 days


#9 posted 04-16-2018 10:59 AM



Looks like that’ll do the job! Maybe scrolls in the ends of the handles too? Or would that be too fancy?

- Dave Polaschek


Thanks, Dave. I’ll leave the handles as they are … I might add lark’s tongues to the side rails, though.


And Ron for the win! Did you make a few extras for your friends? :-)

Do you have to use any downward force?

- theoldfart


Thanks, Kevin … sorry, no extras! No downward pressure needed … just rock it back and forth. It seems to track well in the kerf made by a kerfing plane.


Great work, looks like a beautiful saw to use. Can I borrow it?

- Oldtool


Thanks, Tom. Sure … but you’ll have to come pick it up … LOL!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 701 days


#10 posted 04-16-2018 11:05 AM



Nice work, Ron! I’m curious to hear more about how well it works, especially in wider material. My frame saw is quite a bit bigger — 4’ blade and metal hardware from Blackburn — but also weighs quite a bit more, I’m sure.

- Dan Wolfgang


Thanks, Dan. As I use it more, I’ll be sure to keep you posted. I made this one short and narrow it fit my shop.


Looks like a nice tool…GREAT job!

- Kelster58


Thank you, Kelly!


Looks great! A wee bit big for my shop, though.

- bandit571


Thanks, Bandit. This saw is but 20” wide and 38” long.

View swirt's profile

swirt

2813 posts in 3025 days


#11 posted 04-17-2018 01:23 AM

That came out great Ron. Very nicely done.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 701 days


#12 posted 04-17-2018 10:08 AM



That came out great Ron. Very nicely done.

- swirt


Thank you!

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

3128 posts in 2336 days


#13 posted 04-18-2018 12:50 PM

Ok I see it in action, super interesting. thanks.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 701 days


#14 posted 04-18-2018 01:49 PM



Ok I see it in action, super interesting. thanks.

- bushmaster


Thanks, Brian!

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