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• Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #3: Cart Before the Horse

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 04-14-2018 08:09 PM 1510 reads 1 time favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Handles Part 3 of • Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw series Part 4: Side Rails and a Test Drive »

Cart Before the Horse –
 
I know I said I was going to attach the side rails next, but as I was ripping these parts …
 

 
… it dawned on me that I didn’t know how long they needed to be. I wouldn’t know the length until the blade attachment pieces were in place. So, once I laid out their shape on a cherry board, I drilled holes for the blade pins …
 
               
 
… cut mortises for the handles to pass through …
 

 
… making sure everything stayed square …
 

 
… and tight.
 
               
 
Once they were cut out with a coping saw and shaped with rasp and file, I positioned the handles and attached the blade.
 

 
Now I can determine the length of the side pieces. Once cut, I’ll attach via through mortise and tenon.
 

 
Thanks for looking, more to come. As always, all comments and/or questions welcomed.
 
Follow my progress with the links below.
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #1: The Want
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #2: Handles
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #3: Cart Before the Horse
Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #4: Side Rails and a Test Drive

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



18 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1964 posts in 550 days


#1 posted 04-14-2018 08:18 PM

Oh yeah. Good thing you realized that before cutting the sides to length!

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2601 posts in 2159 days


#2 posted 04-14-2018 08:43 PM

I now see how this saw has an all wood blade mounting, interesting. I’m wondering if through continued use, the blade will wear through the wooden pin.
I’m also wondering how blade tensioning will work. I’ll wait and see.

By the way, sweet drill press there.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

4325 posts in 2234 days


#3 posted 04-14-2018 09:07 PM

Nice work.

Is the drillpress an “Armstrong”?

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View htl's profile

htl

3769 posts in 1127 days


#4 posted 04-14-2018 10:37 PM

Very Interesting!!!

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

167 posts in 776 days


#5 posted 04-14-2018 10:55 PM

Really neat to see this coming together, Ron! The wedge handles blade tension, right?

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#6 posted 04-14-2018 11:40 PM



I now see how this saw has an all wood blade mounting, interesting. I m wondering if through continued use, the blade will wear through the wooden pin.
I m also wondering how blade tensioning will work. I ll wait and see.

By the way, sweet drill press there.

- Oldtool


Thanks, Tom. It’s possible that the blade will wear through the wooden pin. I have poplar pins in there currently. If one wears out … I’ll just pop in another one.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#7 posted 04-14-2018 11:42 PM



Nice work.

Is the drillpress an “Armstrong”?

- ralbuck


Thanks! LOL … yes, an Armstrong  drill press.

Very Interesting!!!

- htl


Thank you!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#8 posted 04-14-2018 11:44 PM



Really neat to see this coming together, Ron! The wedge handles blade tension, right?

- Dan Wolfgang


Thanks, Dan. Yes, I’m hoping for the wedge to provide blade tension.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#9 posted 04-14-2018 11:45 PM



Oh yeah. Good thing you realized that before cutting the sides to length!

- Dave Polaschek


Sure beats taking a hacksaw to the blade … LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1964 posts in 550 days


#10 posted 04-14-2018 11:51 PM

Sure beats taking a hacksaw to the blade … LOL!

I’m starting work on my flush-cut / miter-jack / chairmaker’s-tenon saw soon, and one of the bigger problems is how to turn a cheap panel-saw blade into the right shape. Good thing I have a friend with a plasma cutter. ;-) Once again, I don’t like using power-tools myself, but I’m happy to have someone else use them to help me out.

Edited to add: and I’m not entirely sure “fire” counts as a power tool ;-)

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#11 posted 04-14-2018 11:56 PM


I’m starting work on my flush-cut / miter-jack / chairmaker’s-tenon saw soon, and one of the bigger problems is how to turn a cheap panel-saw blade into the right shape. Good thing I have a friend with a plasma cutter. ;-) Once again, I don’t like using power-tools myself, but I’m happy to have someone else use them to help me out.

- Dave Polaschek


I used a hacksaw to cut an old backsaw blade for my kerfing plane … took forever! I look forward to seeing your flush-cut / miter-jack / chairmaker’s-tenon saw. LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View swirt's profile

swirt

2656 posts in 2940 days


#12 posted 04-15-2018 01:20 AM

Nice solution to the tension problem. Well done.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#13 posted 04-15-2018 10:16 AM


Nice solution to the tension problem. Well done.

- swirt


Thank you, Swirt. I can’t wait for the test drive!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1891 posts in 1356 days


#14 posted 04-15-2018 12:16 PM

So do the side rails have to be adjustable? Just wondering if differences in the temperature between winter and summer might cause some play as the blade expands and contracts that needs to be accounted for.

Also, are frame saws typically used on the push stroke or pull stroke?

I always enjoy seeing your tool builds.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2507 posts in 616 days


#15 posted 04-15-2018 02:11 PM


So do the side rails have to be adjustable? Just wondering if differences in the temperature between winter and summer might cause some play as the blade expands and contracts that needs to be accounted for.

Also, are frame saws typically used on the push stroke or pull stroke?

I always enjoy seeing your tool builds.

- Lazyman


Thanks! There is about 1/2” of play in the wedged blade attachment piece once the frame is secured. This is the only part of the saw that is adjustable. I think this saw will be able to be used on both the push and/or pull stoke equally as well.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 comments

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