LumberJocks

• Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #9: On the Rail

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 11-12-2017 05:58 PM 420 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: Onward & Upward Part 9 of • Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu series Part 10: Panels Rising »

On the Rail –
 
Having calculated the width of the upper case, I ripped and cut to length the various rails. The front received a drawer rail and bottom rail, the back received a top, bottom, and middle rail. At this point I was still unsure of the design of the raised panels.
 

 
So, after squaring the rails …
 

 

 
… I cut a 1/4” x 1/4” groove along the edges of the back stiles and rails.
 

 
The groove plane from my tongue and groove set places the groove 3/16” from the face of the board.
 
               
 
Therefore, the rails will have 3/8” x 1/2” tenons centered in the 3/4” stock.
 

 
After cutting a few tenons in the walnut, my saw needed a bit of a tune-up.
 

 
All better!
 

 
The use of a mirror helps keep things square.
 

 
A strip of tape makes for a great little depth stop!
 

 
So … with all the tenons and grooves cut, it was on to the mortises.
 

 
And what are mortises, really … if not a series of rectangular holes?
 

 
With the grooves cut I had nailed down one aspect of the raised panels. The edges need to taper down to 1/4” x 1/4”. Next up will be the raised panels, once I figure out what the profile looks like.
 
Thanks for looking … all comments and/or questions welcomed. Follow my progress with the links below:
 
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #1 - An Ambitious Endeavor
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #2 - To the File Box!
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #3 - Barley Twist Split Spindle
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #4 - A Secret Drawer
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #5 - Butterflies & Trim
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #6 - Gadrooning
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #7 - The Right Color
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #8 - Onward & Upward
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #9 - On the Rail
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #10 – Panels Rising
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #11 – Panel Risen

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



12 comments so far

View Planeman40's profile (online now)

Planeman40

1016 posts in 2576 days


#1 posted 11-12-2017 06:21 PM

Looking good, Ron!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

1069 posts in 397 days


#2 posted 11-12-2017 06:30 PM

Looks like it’s coming together! Good luck figuring out a profile you like for the panels!

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Oldtool's profile (online now)

Oldtool

2500 posts in 2006 days


#3 posted 11-12-2017 07:58 PM

Looking pretty good Ron, and most definitely looks like fun.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1663 posts in 463 days


#4 posted 11-12-2017 09:26 PM



Looking good, Ron!

- Planeman40

Thanks, Rufus!


Looks like it’s coming together! Good luck figuring out a profile you like for the panels!

- Dave Polaschek

Thanks, Dave. I want a step or two in the profile, yet I do not have a raising plane … going to see what I can accomplish with a chisel and rebate plane. Should be interesting.


Looking pretty good Ron, and most definitely looks like fun.

- Oldtool

Thanks, Tom. Yes, it’s definitely fun … especially with my new found light!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

1069 posts in 397 days


#5 posted 11-13-2017 12:29 AM

Well, I imagine it’s possible to do it, Ron. Might not be easy, but might not be too hard. I’d be tempted to make my own raising plane; I’d learn a lot from my mistakes that way. :-/

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1663 posts in 463 days


#6 posted 11-13-2017 07:46 PM



Well, I imagine it s possible to do it, Ron. Might not be easy, but might not be too hard. I d be tempted to make my own raising plane; I d learn a lot from my mistakes that way. :-/

- Dave Polaschek

Dave, I’m afraid making my own raising plane is out of the question. I barely possess the woodworking skills … I know I do not possess the metalworking skills. LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

1069 posts in 397 days


#7 posted 11-14-2017 12:34 PM

Well. That might be where I have an advantage in my ignorance. I don’t know I can’t do it, so I would just give it a try. Maybe once I finish my first infill smoother (I’m making one the size of a Stanley #1 handplane with a 1” blade and a Norris-style adjuster), I’ll give it a try. What could possibly go wrong?! ;-)

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1663 posts in 463 days


#8 posted 11-14-2017 01:19 PM


Well. That might be where I have an advantage in my ignorance. I don t know I can t do it, so I would just give it a try. Maybe once I finish my first infill smoother (I m making one the size of a Stanley #1 handplane with a 1” blade and a Norris-style adjuster), I ll give it a try. What could possibly go wrong?! ;-)

- Dave Polaschek

Good luck with the infill smoother! As to the raised panels … this is what I want to achieve …
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

1069 posts in 397 days


#9 posted 11-14-2017 01:55 PM

Looks like a couple rabbets and a round plane. Have you read Matt Bickford’s book ? His explanation of how to break complex shapes down into simple components seems a near perfect fit for your panel challenge.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1663 posts in 463 days


#10 posted 11-14-2017 02:24 PM


Looks like a couple rabbets and a round plane. Have you read Matt Bickford s book ? His explanation of how to break complex shapes down into simple components seems a near perfect fit for your panel challenge.

- Dave Polaschek

I have … and this should be easier than it looks. With a methodical approach and lot of patience, it should come out okay! I’ll be using Ambrosia maple for the panels.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

1069 posts in 397 days


#11 posted 11-14-2017 02:46 PM

Well, there it is. Good luck! Hopefully the maple will be well-behaved for you.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1663 posts in 463 days


#12 posted 11-14-2017 03:00 PM



Well, there it is. Good luck! Hopefully the maple will be well-behaved for you.

- Dave Polaschek

Thanks, Dave … I’m cautiously optimistic!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com