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• Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #5: Butterflies & Trim

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 09-03-2017 07:46 PM 1197 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: The Kneeling Platform Part 5 of • Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu series Part 6: Gadrooning »

Butterflies & Trim –
 
Once the secret drawer was fitted and working properly, I glued up three walnut boards to form the top of the kneeling platform. Once the glue dried and the top was squared, I attached it to the frame with seven 3/4” x 3/4” glue blocks.
 

 
Once that  glue dried I decided to add butterflies to re-enforce the rub joint.
 

 
I used 3/16” thick cocobolo for the three 1” x 3” butterflies.
 
               
 
Next up I planed and card scraped a walnut board for the four 3/4” x 1-1/8” trim pieces.
 

 
In order to keep from having to change the blade depth on my kerfing plane, I used a 16” halfback saw to deepen the cuts established by the kerfing plane.
 

 

 
After forming the 3/8” x 9/16” rebate, I ripped a 1-1/8” strip and rounded over the corner with rasp and file …
 

 
The 9/16” deep rebate allows the trim piece to sit 3/16” below the edge of the top. It is these trim pieces that will receive the gadrooning … once I figure out the pattern!
 

 
Thanks for looking … all comments and/or questions welcomed. Follow my progress with the links below:
 
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #1 - An Ambitious Endeavor
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #2 - To the File Box!
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #3 - Barley Twist Split Spindle
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #4 - The Kneeling Platform
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #5 – Butterflies & Trim
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #6 – Gadrooning
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #7 – The Right Color
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



7 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

834 posts in 338 days


#1 posted 09-03-2017 08:21 PM

Looks like it’s coming together nicely, Ron!

I’ve been ripping 3/8” chunks of apple lately for knife scales, and planing the 3/8” poplar I resawed to 1/4” smooth finished pieces that’ll make the back of my plane till once I ship-lap them and build the rest of the box. I have no idea what I would’ve done without my kerfing plane.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2468 posts in 1946 days


#2 posted 09-03-2017 09:30 PM

Great work on the butterflies, nice tight fit. Like your process in this project, hand tool work – no noise, no dust, no mask required, just the sharp blades slicing the wood, and the pleasure of creating something to admire.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1535 posts in 403 days


#3 posted 09-03-2017 10:07 PM



Looks like it s coming together nicely, Ron!

I ve been ripping 3/8” chunks of apple lately for knife scales, and planing the 3/8” poplar I resawed to 1/4” smooth finished pieces that ll make the back of my plane till once I ship-lap them and build the rest of the box. I have no idea what I would ve done without my kerfing plane.

- Dave Polaschek

Thanks, Dave. I look forward to seeing that plane till!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1535 posts in 403 days


#4 posted 09-03-2017 10:12 PM



Great work on the butterflies, nice tight fit. Like your process in this project, hand tool work – no noise, no dust, no mask required, just the sharp blades slicing the wood, and the pleasure of creating something to admire.

- Oldtool

Thanks, Tom. Speaking of sharp … this walnut is taking its toll … I may have to spend the next few days at the old sharpening station!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

834 posts in 338 days


#5 posted 09-04-2017 12:24 AM

Thanks, Dave. I look forward to seeing that plane till!

It’ll probably be a while, Ron. I’m participating in the knife swap, and have done one knife I gave to my girlfriend’s mom, plus two practice knives I’m making for myself, and the apple I’m breaking down is going to be used for the final knife. But I’m learning as I go, and might have one more trial run before I start on the one for the swap.

The plane till is probably going to be fairly simple. Tall enough for a #7, or a 5-1/2 and a 2. I think it’s going to have to be four or five columns wide. I’m thinking 18” wide by 24” high. I’ve got the backs resawed, but still need dividers and the outer carcasse, and a lid. Much lumber to be found and dimensioned yet.

It’s possible you’ll finish the Prie Dieu before I finish my plane till, but the journey is the adventure, or something like that.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

87 posts in 396 days


#6 posted 09-04-2017 11:31 PM

Ron, can you explain about the glue blocks securing the panel to the frame? I frequently read that one must allow for expansion and contraction of the glued-up panel when securing to a frame, but it doesn’t look like this does (I could be missing it though!)
You seem more of a reliable source than the magazines though, so please educate me – is it simply not a big deal with a panel of this size, or does your glue allow for some (slow) play, or is there another factor I don’t see?

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1535 posts in 403 days


#7 posted 09-05-2017 11:37 AM


Ron, can you explain about the glue blocks securing the panel to the frame? I frequently read that one must allow for expansion and contraction of the glued-up panel when securing to a frame, but it doesn t look like this does (I could be missing it though!)
You seem more of a reliable source than the magazines though, so please educate me – is it simply not a big deal with a panel of this size, or does your glue allow for some (slow) play, or is there another factor I don t see?

- JohnMcClure

John, thanks for asking. The walnut being used for this project was kiln dried (6%) about three years ago and has been resting quietly in my shop since then. The particular board used for the top is extremely stable; therefore, I see no issue(s) with the glue blocks. Walnut in and of itself has exceptional dimensional stability. So, as you suggest above … it is simply not a big deal.

This Prie Dieu is at least a few months from completion. If the glue blocks do not fail between now and then … I think it will be good to go!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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