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• Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #1: An Ambitious Endeavor

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 08-07-2017 11:02 AM 1900 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of • Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu series Part 2: To the File Box! »

An Ambitious Endeavor –
 
As you may recall I set out two years ago to build Prie Dieux for the four priests at St. Bede’s Episcopal Church in Tucker, Georgia. This fourth Prie Dieu in the series, being built for the Rector of St. Bede’s, may very well prove to be my most ambitious hand tool endeavor to date. I will be attempting a Louis XIII/Elizabethan-ish  style Prie Dieu in walnut and Ambrosia maple. There will be some firsts for me with this project, like the gadrooning, the barley twist split spindle, and the eight panel door! I’m hoping to achieve something akin to this …
 
              
 
... I pray I haven’t bitten off more than I can chew!
 
Assuming the split spindle to be the most time consuming, I decided to start there. I ripped four 3” wide walnut boards and glued them up into two 1-1/2” x 3” x 30” boards, which were further glued up with brown craft paper in between to form a 3” x 3” turning blank.
 

 
Once I achieve the two beads and flat at either end …
 

 
... I’ll disconnect from the spring pole and attempt the barley twist with saw, gouge, rasp, and file.
 

 
My next post may not be for a few days … LOL!
 
Thanks for looking … all comments and/or questions welcomed.
 
 
 
Follow my progress with the links below:

Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #1 - An Ambitious Endeavor
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #2 - To the File Box!
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #3 - Barley Twist Split Spindle
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #4 - A Secret Drawer
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #5 - Butterflies & Trim
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #6 - Gadrooning
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #7 - The Right Color
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #8 - Onward & Upward
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #9 - On the Rail
Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #10 – Panels Rising
 
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



10 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2499 posts in 2000 days


#1 posted 08-07-2017 11:48 AM

Ron,
Your first paragraph hit home with me as I too have have experienced similar thoughts with projects I’ve started.
First, regarding the most ambitious hand tool endeavor to date, this is what I enjoy about woodworking, the opportunities to perform and learn new methods of work. I especially look for new to me hand tool methods, and if there is a requirement to solve a problem or procedure on “how to”, all the better.
Second, I used to worry about the results of my efforts in doing something new or very precise, but I’ve come to the conclusion: what the heck, there’s always more wood. Perfection on the first attempt is out the window.
So go ahead and enjoy the build, and don’t concern yourself with how much you’ve bitten off. Have fun, isn’t that why we do woodworking?

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

9179 posts in 2261 days


#2 posted 08-07-2017 11:50 AM

Your a very ambitious young man Ron. Looking forward to the series, popcorns ready!

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1628 posts in 457 days


#3 posted 08-07-2017 12:29 PM



Ron,
Your first paragraph hit home with me as I too have have experienced similar thoughts with projects I ve started.
First, regarding the most ambitious hand tool endeavor to date, this is what I enjoy about woodworking, the opportunities to perform and learn new methods of work. I especially look for new to me hand tool methods, and if there is a requirement to solve a problem or procedure on “how to”, all the better.
Second, I used to worry about the results of my efforts in doing something new or very precise, but I ve come to the conclusion: what the heck, there s always more wood. Perfection on the first attempt is out the window.
So go ahead and enjoy the build, and don t concern yourself with how much you ve bitten off. Have fun, isn t that why we do woodworking?

- Oldtool

” ... isn’t that why we do woodworking?”   Precisely!

So far the only hard thing about this turning is the fact that I’m turning walnut on a spring pole lathe. This stuff is harder than my head! I actually look forward to the eight panel door challenge! Thanks for the comment.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1628 posts in 457 days


#4 posted 08-07-2017 12:36 PM



Your a very ambitious young man Ron. Looking forward to the series, popcorns ready!

- theoldfart

”Young man”  … Kevin, you’re too kind! You may have to re-heat the popcorn a few times … this might take quite a bit of time to complete. I typically build my Prie Dieux during Lent … I’m really getting a jump on Lent  this go round!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1010 posts in 2570 days


#5 posted 08-07-2017 01:42 PM

You are off on another one Ron. I will be watching your progress.

Recommendation about marking off and initiating your spirals. Cut two paper strips of the correct widths and wrap around the cylinder core of your spirals. The space between the strips will create your spiral so carefully mark this with a sharp pencil. Using a small hand saw, make a “depth gauge” by clamping some wood strips to the saw so it can cut no deeper than the depth of your spirals. Carefully saw between the strips of paper attached to your wood cylinder to create grooves that are cut to the depth of your carved spirals.

The secret to carving is “blocking” to get the basic dimensions of your carvings correct before you proceed to the “shaping”. To do this with your spirals, remove the paper you wrapped around the wood and use a compass that can hold its setting well and mark off the triangular shape you would remove by carving to make the spiral “octagonal” in cross section. Place the point of the compass in the saw-cut groove and let the pencil mark the line you need to carve to. Once the spiral is carved octagonal in cross section, you can now finish rounding out the spiral by carving and can expect to have an accurate finished spiral.

It is hard to explain all of this in writing. Give me a call or come by and I can explain and show you further.

Rufus

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1628 posts in 457 days


#6 posted 08-07-2017 02:32 PM



You are off on another one Ron. I will be watching your progress.

Recommendation about marking off and initiating your spirals. Cut two paper strips of the correct widths and wrap around the cylinder core of your spirals. The space between the strips will create your spiral so carefully mark this with a sharp pencil. Using a small hand saw, make a “depth gauge” by clamping some wood strips to the saw so it can cut no deeper than the depth of your spirals. Carefully saw between the strips of paper attached to your wood cylinder to create grooves that are cut to the depth of your carved spirals.

The secret to carving is “blocking” to get the basic dimensions of your carvings correct before you proceed to the “shaping”. To do this with your spirals, remove the paper you wrapped around the wood and use a compass that can hold its setting well and mark off the triangular shape you would remove by carving to make the spiral “octagonal” in cross section. Place the point of the compass in the saw-cut groove and let the pencil mark the line you need to carve to. Once the spiral is carved octagonal in cross section, you can now finish rounding out the spiral by carving and can expect to have an accurate finished spiral.

It is hard to explain all of this in writing. Give me a call or come by and I can explain and show you further.

Rufus

- Planeman40

Thanks, Rufus! The method you describe is exactly the method I have in mind to create the barley twist. Stay tuned to see how it all plays out!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3207 posts in 3522 days


#7 posted 08-08-2017 04:53 AM

Ron,

This looks like a very challenging project. Are you planning to split your lathed post before cutting your spirals so you can carve them as mirror image to one another as in the example? Or do you have a way of achieving that without splitting the post?

We really look forward to watching your progress and applaud you on using hand tools for such an endeavor.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1628 posts in 457 days


#8 posted 08-08-2017 12:01 PM



Ron,

This looks like a very challenging project. Are you planning to split your lathed post before cutting your spirals so you can carve them as mirror image to one another as in the example? Or do you have a way of achieving that without splitting the post?

We really look forward to watching your progress and applaud you on using hand tools for such an endeavor.

L/W

- lightweightladylefty

L/W,

Thanks for asking! Once I get the blank roughed out and the beads and flats at both ends, I’ll disconnect from the lathe, split the blank, and form the mirror image twists in what’s called a file box. I’m not quite there yet, but you can see my file box hanging on the wall in the photo below. Thanks again!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1054 posts in 392 days


#9 posted 08-09-2017 09:56 AM

I’m looking forward to watching this build and learning a few new tricks. File box, you say. Guess it’s time to learn about those…

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1628 posts in 457 days


#10 posted 08-09-2017 11:05 AM


I m looking forward to watching this build and learning a few new tricks. File box, you say. Guess it s time to learn about those…

- Dave Polaschek

Thanks, Dave! Ah yes … the old file box … just imagine a bench-top lathe of sorts without any visible means of power. I used the file box to form the pedestal of my music stand …
 

 
... round at the ends … square(ish)  in the middle!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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