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• Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #13: It Is Finished

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 05-11-2017 11:27 PM 647 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: Three in One Part 13 of • Lynnsay's Prie Dieu series no next part

It Is Finished –
 
Over the last few weeks shop time has been a rare commodity, due to dark, gloomy weather; yet, after a most enjoyable outing with my bride in the rain … I managed to procure hinges and a lock. Eventually, the rain stopped and the clouds parted to let the sun shine through. So, it was back to the shop to wrap my brain around putting the desk together. After a cup of hot tea, and an hour or so of chopping …
 

 
... and wedging …
 

 
... then chopping and wedging again … I had created numerous slots in the desk front, back, and sides.
 
                
 
Then … spending several minutes tweaking, trimming, filing, and fitting … It was time for a little “insert tab-A into slot-B”  for final assembly of the desk.
 

 
The edge-moulding that I made earlier will be the last step in the overall assembly. But first, I needed to install the hinges. The brass hinges need to be let into the top by 1/16 of an inch to allow for a flush fit.
 

 
I need to repeat this three more times before screwing the hinges in place!
 

 
After some fine tuning of the ornamental trim pieces, I thought I would tackle the three two-inch high drawers.
 

 
I selected some clear pine, and ripped two 2-inch strips. These strips were then resawn into four 5/16 inch thick strips for drawer sides and backs.
 

 
Using resawn 5/8 inch thick mahogany fronts …
 

 
... and 1/16 inch thick pine bottoms, the drawers slowly became a reality.
 

 
After a couple of dry fits and even more fine tuning … things started to come together quite nicely.
 

 
A quick check for “leaks” and I reach for the glue jar.
 

 
Now, once the glue dries, and the pins and tails are planed flush, I feel confident these dovetails will pass muster!
 

 
I decided on a full mortise lock. Now, I don’t know about you, but chopping a 5/16 inch wide, 2 inch long mortise, 1-5/8 inches deep into the edge of a 3/4 inch thick nicely fitted dovetailed front, is quite unnerving … especially knowing one has no more gummy cherry!
 

 
Whew! I did it.
 

 
After securing the rest of the edge moulding, I’ll slather on a bit of boiled linseed oil and let ‘er soak up some more sun before applying a light coat of shellac and bee’s wax. Click here to see the finished Prie Dieu!

Thank you for following this build, and thank you for all the kinds words along the way!
 

 
 
 
Follow my progress with the links below:
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #1: Getting the Jump on Lent
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #2: Replication in a Cold Dark Shop
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #3: Rip Saw Tune-up and Frame Members
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #4: Mortise and Tenon Joints
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #5: Hollows and Rounds
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #6: Slight Detour
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #7: All the Single Pieces
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #8: The Kneeling Platform
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #9: Mitred Breadboards
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #10: Dovetails
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #11: Edge Moulding
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #12: Three in One
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #13: It Is Finish

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



17 comments so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1753 posts in 1606 days


#1 posted 05-12-2017 01:19 AM

That is some beautiful work Mr Ron. Thanks for sharing thus

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

96 posts in 444 days


#2 posted 05-12-2017 01:25 AM

Really nice work, Ron. I know I asked about it before, but I’d like to know more about the sun exposure to darken the wood. Take some before and after photos, if you think about it!

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2421 posts in 1827 days


#3 posted 05-12-2017 02:33 AM

Nice work Ron, looks great. Regarding the lock mortise, I find the more challenging the task, the greater the satisfaction in completing it. Great looking Prie Deiu.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

290 posts in 125 days


#4 posted 05-12-2017 03:30 AM

A work of love. Very beautiful and amazing craftsmanship.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

9269 posts in 2017 days


#5 posted 05-12-2017 06:34 AM

Quite the journey

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8669 posts in 2088 days


#6 posted 05-12-2017 11:42 AM

Whew, glad that’s done. It was hard holding my breath waiting for the climatic finish!

Really well done Ron. I’ve learned a lot from your build. Thank you for an excellent blog series.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#7 posted 05-12-2017 12:36 PM

Thank you all for your kind words. Yes, this was indeed a labor of love, and I too learned a lot.

Dan, to answer your questions about darkening cherry in the sun … ultraviolet light from the sun causes the tannins in cherry to darken over time. I have found that the application of boiled linseed oil speeds thing up a bit. I hope this grouping of photos from the blog will suffice for ”before and after”  photos.

 
You might also find the article helpful … Chemical Stains by Bruce Wedlock.

Kevin – You might want to breathe a bit on the next one … I have a feeling it is going to be a bit more involved … LOL!
 
Thanks again, guys!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

37 posts in 76 days


#8 posted 05-12-2017 01:35 PM

Dear Ron, I also make all the words of those who commented. This was a wonderful work with the taste of the great challenges and the love of what you really feel. It was very pleasant to enjoy it with you. Thank you very much for showing and sharing it with us.

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#9 posted 05-12-2017 02:13 PM



Dear Ron, I also make all the words of those who commented. This was a wonderful work with the taste of the great challenges and the love of what you really feel. It was very pleasant to enjoy it with you. Thank you very much for showing and sharing it with us.

- Daniel Solowiej

Thank you, Daniel … my pleasure!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1607 posts in 1614 days


#10 posted 05-12-2017 07:20 PM

Beautiful and well done. I find that gummy cherry to be hard and hard to work with.

I decided on a full mortise lock. Now, I don’t know about you, but chopping a 5/16 inch wide, 2 inch long mortise, 1-5/8 inches deep into the edge of a 3/4 inch thick nicely fitted dovetailed front, is quite unnerving … especially knowing one has no more gummy cherry!

At this point I would have found a way to get you some of mine since you did help me by identifying it!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#11 posted 05-12-2017 07:50 PM


Beautiful and well done. I find that gummy cherry to be hard and hard to work with.

I decided on a full mortise lock. Now, I don’t know about you, but chopping a 5/16 inch wide, 2 inch long mortise, 1-5/8 inches deep into the edge of a 3/4 inch thick nicely fitted dovetailed front, is quite unnerving … especially knowing one has no more gummy cherry!

At this point I would have found a way to get you some of mine since you did help me by identifying it!

- jeffswildwood

Thanks, Jeff! Yes, gummy cherry is difficult to work with … you need to be slow and methodical and have very sharp tools. Luckily I didn’t crack the front. I just love the natural “X” ...
 

 
BUT the next time I find myself in that situation … I’ll keep you in mind! Thanks, again!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Blackberry's profile

Blackberry

83 posts in 790 days


#12 posted 05-13-2017 01:41 PM

A TRUE craftsman! Job well done.

View Jim Rowe's profile

Jim Rowe

957 posts in 1949 days


#13 posted 05-13-2017 05:00 PM

Well done and congratulations on a most detailed blog guide.
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#14 posted 05-13-2017 11:08 PM



A TRUE craftsman! Job well done.

- Blackberry

Thank you, sir … you’re too kind!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#15 posted 05-13-2017 11:09 PM



Well done and congratulations on a most detailed blog guide.
Jim

- Jim Rowe

Thanks, Jim! I enjoyed writing the blog almost as much as building the Prie Dieu …

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 comments

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