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• Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #12: Three in One

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 04-26-2017 03:33 PM 593 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: Edge Moulding Part 12 of • Lynnsay's Prie Dieu series Part 13: It Is Finished »

Three in One –
 
With frame construction completed, the desk dovetailed together, and the sticking completed for the fitted top and lid, it was time to venture into the interior of the desk. I decided to use Honduran mahogany for the bottom, shelf, dividers, and drawer fonts. I thought this would make for a nice contrast against the gummy cherry.
 
I started off by resawing a piece of mahogany into 3/8 and 1/4 inch thick pieces for the shelf and dividers.
 

 
I really should think about getting a bigger saw for this … LOL!
 

 
As I mentioned earlier, I want to have three niches with drawers underneath. The niches need to be adorned with some sort of trim at the top … just because. Using a coping saw I cut out said trim from a 7/8 inch thick piece of mahogany …
 

 
Given that I have three niches, I just resaw this piece into thirds … and yes, I used that same little rip saw shown above … voilà.
 

 
The sides will have grooves cut in them to accept the shelf, The top and bottom will have stopped dados to accept the dividers. Putting all of this together will take a bit of orchestration!
 

 
I mentioned in an earlier post that the niches/drawers were to represent the Trinity. After resawing the 7/8 inch mahogany piece into thirds, I noticed that the center piece was somewhat scratched-up compared to the two smooth outside pieces. So what better piece to use for the center niche!

As you look at the niches and think of the Trinity; Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, that center niche becomes rather appropriate. After all … It is by his wounds that we are healed.
 

 
I like how this is coming along … I think the mahogany will pop once I apply boiled linseed oil.
 

 
The drawers underneath the niches will be the smallest I have built to date. The opening is only two inches high! If there is going to be any drawer space at all, the bottoms will need to be really thin. So with my trusty kerfing saw I prepare to resaw a 1/8 inch thick piece of pine.
 

 
Once resawn … I use my shop-made scraper plane to further thin down this piece for the drawer bottoms …
 

 
... and perhaps that  should be thin enough! What do you  think?
 

 
Thanks for looking … all comments and/or questions welcomed … more to come!
 
 
 
Follow my progress with the links below:
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #1: Getting the Jump on Lent
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #2: Replication in a Cold Dark Shop
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #3: Rip Saw Tune-up and Frame Members
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #4: Mortise and Tenon Joints
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #5: Hollows and Rounds
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #6: Slight Detour
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #7: All the Single Pieces
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #8: The Kneeling Platform
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #9: Mitred Breadboards
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #10: Dovetails
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #11: Edge Moulding
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #12: Three in One
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #13: It Is Finish

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



6 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2421 posts in 1827 days


#1 posted 04-26-2017 07:50 PM

Looks very nice Ron, well designed and executed. There is a sweet pleasure in hand crafting a project to completion, especially when using hand crafted tools like the scraper plane.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#2 posted 04-26-2017 08:15 PM



Looks very nice Ron, well designed and executed. There is a sweet pleasure in hand crafting a project to completion, especially when using hand crafted tools like the scraper plane.

- Oldtool

Thanks, Tom! You are absolutely right about hand crafted tools. They seem to add yet another dimension to hand tool woodworking. Thanks, again!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

37 posts in 76 days


#3 posted 04-27-2017 11:55 AM

It is by His wounds that we are healed, and it is by His will the center piece was scratched-up. There are always messages through devout people, Illuminating and inspiring them. So, good point you explain it. And the final picture is a symbol of that light, and of the serious position you take.
I see that your dovetails also represent the holy trinity and its multiple numbers.

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#4 posted 04-27-2017 12:37 PM



It is by His wounds that we are healed, and it is by His will the center piece was scratched-up. There are always messages through devout people, Illuminating and inspiring them. So, good point you explain it. And the final picture is a symbol of that light, and of the serious position you take.
I see that your dovetails also represent the holy trinity and its multiple numbers.

- Daniel Solowiej

Very observant, Daniel … thanks! With just a slight re-grouping of dovetails, a few scratches on the trim, and of course an open mind; I think I was able to incorporate these elements without altering the overall design of the original William & Mary desk on frame.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

276 posts in 177 days


#5 posted 05-11-2017 12:34 AM

You are an amazing craftsman. Thanks for sharing…......

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#6 posted 05-11-2017 10:18 AM



You are an amazing craftsman. Thanks for sharing…......

- Kelster58

Thank you, sir! I’m just a couple of weeks away from the presentation.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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