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• Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #9: Mitred Breadboards

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 04-13-2017 11:41 PM 614 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: The Kneeling Platform Part 9 of • Lynnsay's Prie Dieu series Part 10: Dovetails »

Mitred Breadboards -
 
In order to run a bull-nose around the perimeter of the kneeling platform top, I thought it prudent to attach breadboards. Given that I do not want any end-grain showing, the breadboards need to be mitred. So … with my highly detailed drawing in hand …
 
                  
 
... I get to work! The breadboards are simply 1 inch strips of 3/4 cherry with 1/4 inch x 5/16 inch grooves along one edge and a 45° mitred end. There are also mortises in the floor of the groove to accept the tenons from the opposing board.
 

 
Nothing to them … they are the easy parts. The challenge comes when attaching the breadboard to the end-grain of the opposing board. The opposing board is going to move with the seasons and the breadboard has to accommodate this movement. To make matters worse … the breadboard itself will also be moving along its width with seasonal changes. The opposing board is cut as a negative to the breadboards. First I must form the tongue. I do this with a sharp knife …
 

 
and chisel.
 

 
Keeping the knife sharp as I go …
 

 
I continue with the chisel, knife, chisel …
 

 
... until I have formed a 1/4 inch rebate. At this point I repeat the process on the backside of the board. Once I have rebates on both sides I then match the mortises in the breadboard with tenons. I lay out the tenons and remove the tongue in between with a coping saw.
 

 
Looks like I got the left side of the tongue a bit high … so much for eyeballing, huh? There! All better.
 

 
So, there you have it … one kneeling platform top with mitered breadboards …
 

 
Given that the top fit the frame nicely …
 

 
... I took the time to glue and drawbore the entire frame.
 

 
Once I drawbore the breadboards, I’ll form the bull-nose, and then slather all of this with linseed oil and let it sit in the sun. Off to the desk … I’m getting there! Thanks for looking … all comments and/or questions welcomed … more to come!
 
 
 
Follow my progress with the links below:
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #1: Getting the Jump on Lent
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #2: Replication in a Cold Dark Shop
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #3: Rip Saw Tune-up and Frame Members
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #4: Mortise and Tenon Joints
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #5: Hollows and Rounds
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #6: Slight Detour
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #7: All the Single Pieces
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #8: The Kneeling Platform
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #9: Mitred Breadboards
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #10: Dovetails
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #11: Edge Moulding
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #12: Three in One
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #13: It Is Finish
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



6 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2448 posts in 1884 days


#1 posted 04-14-2017 12:41 AM

Nice detail touch with the mitered breadboard ends, adds a beautuful corner & proof of hand tooling.
I assume you will glue the front few inches of the breadboards, then any main board movement will be at the back. Correct?
Thanks for sharing, nice work.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1343 posts in 341 days


#2 posted 04-14-2017 01:41 AM



Nice detail touch with the mitered breadboard ends, adds a beautuful corner & proof of hand tooling.
I assume you will glue the front few inches of the breadboards, then any main board movement will be at the back. Correct?
Thanks for sharing, nice work.

- Oldtool

Thanks … yes, that is correct! Sorry I failed to mention that. The holes opposite the mitre are are also elongated and just glued to the breadboard. Thanks again!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Blackberry's profile

Blackberry

83 posts in 847 days


#3 posted 04-14-2017 03:02 AM

Linseed oil or tung oil?
Clock is ticking Ron, looking great though.
I was puzzled that the holes did seem elongated but I saw in your comments that they were, you’ve got this!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1343 posts in 341 days


#4 posted 04-14-2017 11:44 AM


Linseed oil or tung oil?
Clock is ticking Ron, looking great though.
I was puzzled that the holes did seem elongated but I saw in your comments that they were, you ve got this!

- Blackberry

Thanks! I will be using linseed oil, a thin coat of shellac, and bee’s wax. Thanks again!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

78 posts in 133 days


#5 posted 04-14-2017 01:00 PM

The breadboard ends has a very cute design !

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1343 posts in 341 days


#6 posted 04-14-2017 01:03 PM



The breadboard ends has a very cute design !

- Daniel Solowiej

Thanks, Daniel. I’ll be using this design on the lid of the desk as well.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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