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• Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #1: Getting the Jump on Lent

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 02-14-2017 11:36 AM 2912 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of • Lynnsay's Prie Dieu series Part 2: Replication in a Cold Dark Shop »

Getting the Jump on Lent –
 
Lent, an Old English word meaning “spring,” the time of lengthening days, is that season of the Church between Ash Wednesday and Easter. During the season of Lent, many Christians commit to fasting or giving up certain types of luxuries as a form of penance. There is however another school of thought, one of taking on or adding a Lenten spiritual discipline, such as reading a daily devotional or praying through a Lenten calendar, to draw oneself nearer to God.
 
If you recall, my 2016 Lenten discipline was one of an Arts and Craft Style Prie Dieu for the Assistant Rector of St. Bede’s Episcopal Church, and a Folding Prie Dieu for the Hispanic Missioner for the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta. I will be taking on a similar discipline this Lent, building a Prie Dieu based on a William & Mary desk on frame, for the Director of The Julian of Norwich Center, Atlanta.
 
So, with an empty bench, an idle lathe, the lengthening of days, and a clear 7/4 cherry board … I’ve decided to get the jump on Lent!
 

 
First up, I need to trim a bit off the 7/4 cherry board so I can …
 
             
 
... cut out four turning blanks!
 
             
 
1-3/4×1-3/4 … keeping the sawing square makes for easy plane work later!
 
                 
 
Once cut out and smoothed, I use my shop made center finder and mark the center of each blank.
 

 
Then … from each corner, I strike an arc, passing through the center point …
 

 
... and set my marking gauge for where these arcs meet the sides. If the blank is square this distance will be the same all the way around!
 

 
I then carry this line all along the side of the blank where I’ll be turning. These legs will be square at the top and bottom for about 5-1/2”.
 

 
I connect the scribe lines with a series of perpendicular saw kerfs …
 

 
... and begin forming an octagon by removing the waste, with a chisel, from the corners down to the scribe lines.
 

 
With the octagon formed … it’s off to the lathe!
 

 
My lathe is of the spring pole variety; shop built about 19 years ago from yellow pine timbers. The spring pole is a hickory sapling, the spring arm is hackberry, and the tool rest is cherry. I used metal weaving shuttle tips for the centers. See more photos of the lathe HERE on its project page.
 
             
 
Having roughed out the octagon to a more presentable cylinder I started cutting in the details.
 
             
 
Using turning tools, chisels, files, and sandpaper …
 
             
 
With sharp tools ... the cherry cuts like butter!
 

 
Just three more to go …
 

 
... will have to start up again tomorrow … it’s getting dark and my leg’s tired!
 
Thanks for looking … all comments and/or questions welcomed!
 
 
Follow my progress with the links below:
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #1: Getting the Jump on Lent
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #2: Replication in a Cold Dark Shop
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #3: Rip Saw Tune-up and Frame Members
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #4: Mortise and Tenon Joints
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #5: Hollows and Rounds
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #6: Slight Detour
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #7: All the Single Pieces
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #8: The Kneeling Platform
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #9: Mitred Breadboards
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #10: Dovetails
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #11: Edge Moulding
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #12: Three in One
Lynnsay's Prie Dieu #13: It Is Finish

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



11 comments so far

View Jim Rowe's profile

Jim Rowe

976 posts in 2010 days


#1 posted 02-14-2017 12:02 PM

This looks like it’s going to be an interesting project. I like your lathe!
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

955 posts in 2459 days


#2 posted 02-14-2017 12:38 PM

I’ll be following along!

Rufus (AKA “Planeman”)

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View murch's profile

murch

1370 posts in 2322 days


#3 posted 02-14-2017 01:03 PM

Yeah, I’ll be watching. Very interesting so far . ( you have heard of electricity, right? ) :-)

-- A family man has photos in his wallet where his money used to be.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1347 posts in 345 days


#4 posted 02-14-2017 02:46 PM



This looks like it s going to be an interesting project. I like your lathe!
Jim

- Jim Rowe

Thanks, Jim. If you have not tried a spring pole lathe, you should. It’s a lot of work, but a great deal of fun!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1347 posts in 345 days


#5 posted 02-14-2017 03:09 PM



I ll be following along!

Rufus (AKA “Planeman”)

- Planeman40

Thanks, Rufus … I hope my knees hold out!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1347 posts in 345 days


#6 posted 02-14-2017 04:23 PM



Yeah, I ll be watching. Very interesting so far . ( you have heard of electricity, right? ) :-)

- murch

Thanks, Murch! Electricity, yes I’ve heard of electricity … but when the EM Pulse wipes out the power grid … I still get to play in the shop … LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

294 posts in 238 days


#7 posted 02-14-2017 09:31 PM

Thanks so much for sharing this. I just discovered this site a few months ago. Since then, I have all my students look at LumberJocks. Mostly for project ideas. I am thankful that this site is a great example of skilled craftsmen and women that are willing to share and encourage. Often I want to show my students that there are other ways to enjoy woodworking. They were fascinated by this post. Tomorrow they will see your YouTube video “A Simple Gift”. I am heartened that these young people enjoy seeing skilled craftsmen using hand tools. They really do appreciate and recognize how much skill is involved.

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1347 posts in 345 days


#8 posted 02-15-2017 12:06 AM



Thanks so much for sharing this. I just discovered this site a few months ago. Since then, I have all my students look at LumberJocks. Mostly for project ideas. I am thankful that this site is a great example of skilled craftsmen and women that are willing to share and encourage. Often I want to show my students that there are other ways to enjoy woodworking. They were fascinated by this post. Tomorrow they will see your YouTube video “A Simple Gift”. I am heartened that these young people enjoy seeing skilled craftsmen using hand tools. They really do appreciate and recognize how much skill is involved.

- Kelster58

Thank you very much. I’m honored to be part of your class. My woodworking is definitely a labor of love and my shop my sanctuary. Thanks again!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

119 posts in 505 days


#9 posted 02-15-2017 02:01 AM

Ron, I’m in awe to see the square next to the saw. My sawing is definitely getting better but I’m far from able to make cuts like that!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1347 posts in 345 days


#10 posted 02-15-2017 11:21 AM


Ron, I m in awe to see the square next to the saw. My sawing is definitely getting better but I m far from able to make cuts like that!

- Dan Wolfgang

Thanks, Dan! Slow and methodical, my friend … slow and methodical. Oh, yeah … let the saw do the work! That’s why we spent all that time sharpening it, right?

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1347 posts in 345 days


#11 posted 02-15-2017 11:31 PM

One advantage of having having a dark shop, is that it hides the inconsistencies …
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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