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• Hepplewhite Stand #8: Completed Legs and Drawbore Pins

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Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 01-30-2017 03:23 PM 1141 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Tapering the Legs Part 8 of • Hepplewhite Stand series Part 9: The Drawer »

 
Although the drawknife quickly removed the waste along the tapers, the surface was left rough. Using a 1-1/2” chisel (honed to a 25° bevel) I pared the tapers to a flat surface, getting as close to the knife wall as I felt comfortable.
 

 
After paring with the chisel, I set a block plane for a thin shaving and planed along the tapers, getting closer and closer, until the knife wall disappeared.
 

 
Remember that nasty knot I discovered while ripping the leg pieces? Well … this was the best I could do. Luckily, it is on the backside of the stand!
 

 
After getting full length shavings with the block plane, I used my shop built card scraper plane to further smooth the tapers. With the legs complete it was time to make some drawbore pins.
 

 
Perhaps the best way to put together a mortise and tenon joint is by drawboring. This simply means that when you drill the holes for a dowel to pin the joint together you offset the hole in the tenon towards the shoulder, ever so slightly, so that the pin actually bends a little to get the joint together. This puts a little tension in the joint, and any shrinkage will be taken up by the tension. The joint is incredibly strong.
 
As mentioned in an earlier forum post, I use bamboo kabob skewers to make drawbore pins. I find the skewers in the camping equipment section of Wal-Mart of all places. You just cannot beat the value. At any rate, I used my shop built miter block and cut the 14 required 1-1/2 inch drawbore pins.
 

 
If you remember, before cutting the mortises in the legs, I bored 3/16 inch holes for the drawbore pins. Dry fitting the tenons in their respective mortise, I mark the center of the bore with an awl.
 

 
I then remove the piece and re-mark a center point slightly offset towards the shoulder … maybe 1/16 of an inch …
 

 
... and bore a 3/16 inch hole using this new center mark.
 

 
At this point I remove the waste at each end of the legs. I then reassemble the parts (with glue) and align the bored holes by cranking the parts together with clamps …
 

 
Once aligned, I drive in the pins with a few taps and remove the clamps. The tension within the joint via the drawbore pins is enough while the glue dries.
 

 
Next up … the drawer. Thanks for looking … more to come!
 
 
 
 
Hepplewhite Stand #1: What's Wrong With This Picture
Hepplewhite Stand #2: First Things First
Hepplewhite Stand #3: Lay-Out & Rough-Cut
Hepplewhite Stand #4: A Proper Edge
Hepplewhite Stand #5: Mortises - Finally!
Hepplewhite Stand #6: Frame Members Sized for Tenons
Hepplewhite Stand #7: Tapering the legs
Hepplewhite Stand #8: Completed Legs and Drawbore Pins
Hepplewhite Stand #9: The Drawer
Hepplewhite Stand #10: Final Assembly
 
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.



6 comments so far

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

9366 posts in 2320 days


#1 posted 01-30-2017 04:01 PM

Ron, i used the same process on a small table/nightstand

Yours is coming along quite well, anxious to see the drawer.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1909 posts in 517 days


#2 posted 01-30-2017 04:04 PM

Interesting joint there, Kevin! I’d love to see the stand. Am I seeing bamboo pins?

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

9366 posts in 2320 days


#3 posted 01-30-2017 04:18 PM

Ron, here you go

I’m going to add a drawer some day.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1909 posts in 517 days


#4 posted 01-30-2017 04:25 PM

Very nice … in the first photo it did not look like a 45° angle … but now I see it. I can only assume your drawer will be suspended from the upper frame members (?) ... what about four wedge shaped drawers coming out from all four sides? Hmmmm ….

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

9366 posts in 2320 days


#5 posted 01-30-2017 05:01 PM

Ron, the angle is less than 45 since the frame is rectangular. The drawer is planned to be hung under the top frame. I put in a couple of cross members to help suspend it.

As far as wedge shaped drawers, you first! :-)

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1909 posts in 517 days


#6 posted 01-30-2017 05:13 PM

Kevin, thanks for the clarification.

As far as wedge shaped drawers, you first! :-)

- theoldfart

I may just have to try that …

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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