• Hepplewhite Stand #6: Frame Members Sized for Tenons

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Ron Aylor posted 01-16-2017 05:26 PM 986 reads 0 times favorited 1 comment Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Mortises ... Finally! Part 6 of • Hepplewhite Stand series Part 7: Tapering the Legs »

What crazy weather we’ve been having in Atlanta. One week there’s ice all over everything with temperatures in the teens, and the next week we are all running around in shorts enjoying temperatures in the 70s. It’s a wonder we’re not all in the hospital!

Taking advantage of the warm days, I decided to put in a few hours cutting the frame members to size and forming the tenons. First, I ripped the front, sides and back to the required 4-1/2” width.

After jointing the edges, I cut the pieces to length, leaving room for the 3/8” x 3/4” tenons on the ends.

The front piece was split into the drawer rail and draw front, maintaining continuity of the grain pattern and all of those great little cat’s paws.

Using my newly built rebate saw … I set the blade height to 3/8” …

... the fence at 3/4” …

... and started defining the shoulders for the tenons.

After forming the cheeks with a tenon saw … they seemed to fit perfectly.

Hey look … I’m almost done!

Next up … tapering the legs. Perhaps I should think about sharpening my drawknife!. Thanks for looking … more to come!

Hepplewhite Stand #1: What's Wrong With This Picture
Hepplewhite Stand #2: First Things First
Hepplewhite Stand #3: Lay-Out & Rough-Cut
Hepplewhite Stand #4: A Proper Edge
Hepplewhite Stand #5: Mortises - Finally!
Hepplewhite Stand #6: Frame Members Sized for Tenons
Hepplewhite Stand #7: Tapering the legs
Hepplewhite Stand #8: Completed Legs and Drawbore Pins
Hepplewhite Stand #9: The Drawer
Hepplewhite Stand #10: Final Assembly

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

1 comment so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2289 posts in 578 days

#1 posted 01-18-2017 11:09 PM

Further progress …


-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics