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Workbench Build #1: Workbench Build

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Blog entry by RoadHogg posted 515 days ago 2529 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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I’ve worked with wood and been interested in woodworking since I was a child…some 40 years. Until now, I’ve never had the three things I needed to really explore that passion…time, space, money. To start off, I need a place to work so I built a simple workbench. I found these plans in Woodsmith magazine. The construction is simple, inexpensive and sturdy…just what I need.

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, Editor Popular Woodworking



11 comments so far

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4125 posts in 671 days


#1 posted 515 days ago

Nice build. I have been looking at that particular plan. Looks very sturdy.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View RoadHogg's profile

RoadHogg

71 posts in 523 days


#2 posted 515 days ago

Thanks Sandra. It’s VERY sturdy…and heavy. I am not sure what finish to use is all. I want something to protect the MDF from damage. Any ideas?

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, Editor Popular Woodworking

View stefang's profile

stefang

12525 posts in 1930 days


#3 posted 515 days ago

Very nice bench build. You could just use some horizontal or vertical wood strips to protect the MDF from bumps.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View RoadHogg's profile

RoadHogg

71 posts in 523 days


#4 posted 515 days ago

Thanks Mike. Yes, the edging is laying on top in the last picture. I’ve since turned the top over the right way up. I want to do some sanding on the base and install a side vice before installing the edging and attaching the top. Once I’m done I can post it in the “projects” section…apparently I can’t post an unfinished project there.

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, Editor Popular Woodworking

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4125 posts in 671 days


#5 posted 515 days ago

Not sure what you would do to the MDF to protect it. Maybe someone else will chime in.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View BigRedKnothead's profile

BigRedKnothead

4376 posts in 578 days


#6 posted 514 days ago

Looks fun. If your like me, as soon as you finish this one, you’ll be thinking about the next one you could build.

Sealing the mdf is tough one. Polyurethane (I like satin) would definitely give it scratch and moisture resistance. But it would make it a little slick. Not a biggie if your not planing on it. Danish oil would protect it some, and would be slick. I guess i’m saying it depends on what kind of work you’ll be doing on it.

-- Red -- "Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: What! You too? I thought I was the only one." C.S. Lewis

View stefang's profile

stefang

12525 posts in 1930 days


#7 posted 513 days ago

If you are talking about a finish, then I would go for oil based polyurethane, Maybe 3 coats would be enough. That will protect it from water, oil and glue. Danish oil has resins in it, so that could also work well and be more easily renewable. I suggest you take a small piece of MDF and try both and test them a little before deciding.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View BigRedKnothead's profile

BigRedKnothead

4376 posts in 578 days


#8 posted 513 days ago

Looking back, I meant to say danish oil would Not be very slick. Just saw today in a fww book, guy use clear, premix shellac on mdf. That would work too. Easy to freshen up but not as tough as poly.

-- Red -- "Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: What! You too? I thought I was the only one." C.S. Lewis

View stefang's profile

stefang

12525 posts in 1930 days


#9 posted 513 days ago

The only problem with shellac is that it isn’t resistant to water or alcohol and water based glues.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9566 posts in 1214 days


#10 posted 513 days ago

Sharp bench indeed, congrats and well done!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View RoadHogg's profile

RoadHogg

71 posts in 523 days


#11 posted 510 days ago

I think I know how I’m going to finish my bench! I love the look of this one!

http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/showthread.php?50262-Unique-versatile-small-shop-work-bench&referrerid=37810

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, Editor Popular Woodworking

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