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Let's build a small infill smoother! #3: Filling it in

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Blog entry by Ripthorn posted 02-21-2015 04:15 AM 1549 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: More Metalworking Part 3 of Let's build a small infill smoother! series Part 4: Shaping up »

Alright, here we are again. I discovered that peening threaded rod is not a wise idea. I had some longer flat head, slotted screws that were about 3” long, so I cut them down to about 1/2”, used some epoxy (a few got red loctite, just to see what difference if any there exists in this application) and was able to get most of the screws in.

After that, I decided to shape the rounded profile of the front and rear. I have a 40 grit blue sanding belt (aluminum zirconia) that I have never used, but these are made primarily for sanding steel and other hard metals. I put it on, and all I can say is “Wow!” These are totally worth every penny. I just worked the profiles by hand, ultimately ending up with this:

That meant that next up was putting in the infills. I decided to use epoxy and then I would do screws into the infills after the epoxy was set. This was to ensure that the bedding was perfectly flat and lined up. So I cleaned the metal with denatured alcohol and scored the infill to give the epoxy something to bite into. I just used a marking knife, like so:

I mixed up some 5 minute epoxy, put in the bedding infill, and positioned it so that it mated perfectly with bedding part of the sole. It took a couple tries, but wasn’t hard to do. Then I did the front infill. There was a small gap that I close up with a clamp:

I had a little bit of shop time left, so cut a 2” piece of 3/8”x1 1/2” steel that will be my lever cap. It’s this short because it’s a small plane. Here is what we start with:

And after about 10 minutes with the sanding belt, I got to this point before coming in:

I will further refine the shape, drill and tap for the screw, and then drill for the pivot screws next. That also means I will need a blade. I put in my 3/16” scraps ground like a blade and the mouth is totally closed. I anticipate using 5/32” O1 for the blade, so that should be just fine. I can always open it more, but I can’t close it in.

Lessons Learned

- The blue aluminum zirconia belts are the most awesome thing for shaping metal
- Gaps in infills is bad, but tiny ones disappear
- Don’t try to peen something that has just been epoxied in, it won’t end well


Total time to this point: ~6 hrs

We are getting close. If I had the steel for the blade on hand, I just might be able to take some test cuts tomorrow. We’ll see.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science



6 comments so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#1 posted 02-21-2015 01:57 PM

I’d be looking for a temporary cutter about now. I’d need a shavings fix!!

Thanks for the ride along!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2449 days


#2 posted 02-21-2015 03:15 PM

Don, don’t think that I haven’t looked at that extra block plane blade. The only thing stopping me is the fact that I would have to grind it to width.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View terryR's profile

terryR

6317 posts in 1772 days


#3 posted 02-21-2015 03:54 PM

Thanks again, Brian.
These photos of each step are teaching me tons…as well as your lessons learned!

I know nothing about peening…where to read and catch up? What the first choice for peening rods? Or are plain rods epoxied into the sides and infill wood enough?

Gonna have to hack up an old Dunlap 4, and try an infill. Looks like too much fun!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#4 posted 02-21-2015 04:09 PM



I know nothing about peening…where to read and catch up? What the first choice for peening rods? Or are plain rods epoxied into the sides and infill wood enough?

- terryR

Terry, use screws or bolts, I like brass, flat head (Phillips has the indent for the driver to far down the shaft) slightly taper the hole, grind the top, and hit it with a hammer. I like to epoxy them in, but I don’t think its a necessity.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View terryR's profile

terryR

6317 posts in 1772 days


#5 posted 02-21-2015 04:28 PM

Thanks, Don.

I have a pretty sweet shop-made infill to use for an example!
:)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Slyy's profile

Slyy

2425 posts in 1119 days


#6 posted 03-04-2015 07:34 PM

Awesome read so far Brian! That for the write up! On to the next part!

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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