LumberJocks

Buying lumber and ordering the Freud bits

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Blog entry by Rich posted 12-04-2016 05:15 AM 1063 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Once I had decided to commit to the project, I headed down to the local hardwood dealer, Woodwork’s Source. They have a nice selection of woods, and are very easy to work with, allowing you to pick through the stacks to get just what you want. They also do simple cuts for free. The lumber was going to be coming home in a large SUV, so I had to get them to do some cutting to get the 10 foot boards down to fit.

We decided on knotty alder. Knotty woods are nice since no two doors will be alike. Alder is easy to work with and finishes relatively well if you do it right. My wife does the finishing. She has the patience that I don’t have and a better eye for colors, etc. I like to say that I just build it — she makes it pretty.

I picked the stile pieces first. I needed a solid 80 inches of 8/4 without too much in the way of edge voids left by loose knots, and minimal checking on the ends. I decided to have the guys at the store cut them to 82 inches so there would be room to trim the rough end and square things up. Since the doors are 30 and 28 inches wide, using 24 inch segments for the rail pieces made sense, so the rest of the pieces were cut to 72 inches, leaving roughly 48 inches from each 10 foot piece of 8/4.

I chose to make the stiles 5 inches wide for the 30 inch doors and 4-1/2 inches wide for the 28 inch ones. The top rail is traditionally the same width as the stiles, and I went with 9 inch kick rails and 7 inch lock rails. It turned out to be a really good choice and resulted in a nice proportion on the finished product.

The panels were going to be made using 4/4. Using rough calculations for the heights of the top and bottom panels, I had the 10 foot boards cut into two pieces each that minimized the waste.

We only bought enough wood to hit the 100 bd-ft discount point. I forgot to mention that there was a sale going on that included alder lumber — clear and knotty — but they do bump the discount a bit further for the quantity purchase. Since there was still money that was going to be spent on the Freud stick and cope router bit set and panel raising bit, I didn’t want to blow a big amount on wood until I was sure I could handle the project.

For the router bits, I went with the Freud 99-268 rail and stile bit set which has an ogee profile, and the 99-518 bit for the panels.

I figured it would be wise to build a small 2 foot square frame and mill a panel to go in there to get the hang of the bits once they arrived. For simplicity, the frame would just be made with the standard cope cut, not the long tenons. Like I said earlier, I still wasn’t sure my 2-1/4 horse router was up to the task.

— Rich

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.



4 comments so far

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1488 posts in 3309 days


#1 posted 12-04-2016 04:44 PM

If you remove the stock on two or more passes, your router should be powerful enough. I have a 3-1/4 HP router router and it kind of scares me. It will also reduce tear out, etc. (especially with knots). You might want to have another set of brushes in stock, just in case.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Rich's profile

Rich

1504 posts in 339 days


#2 posted 12-04-2016 05:41 PM

Right. As it turned out, I was able to make the stick cuts in one pass, and the panel raising cuts in one pass as well. The only one I had to do two passes on was the cope cut, and that was because the tenons were cut back 2 inches. In other words, it wasn’t a horsepower issue, it was that the diameter of the bit was less than the width of the cut.

I went back and forth on the motor. I wanted that 3-1/4 horse Porter Cable, but I’d just blown $350 on the Bench Dog router table extension for my table saw and that much again on the JessEm router lift. One of these days this little pup will burn out and then I’ll get the motor I really want. However, I am pleased with its performance so far.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1488 posts in 3309 days


#3 posted 12-07-2016 02:57 PM

I’m glad it worked out for you. At some point you’ll then be faced with the dilemma of wanting one router for hand held/plunge work and one permanently installed in the router table. It never ends…

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Rich's profile

Rich

1504 posts in 339 days


#4 posted 12-08-2016 05:04 AM

Been there, done that. Got the t-shirt Skully. That’s the joy of building in my opinion. Any reason to buy another tool is a good thing for me.

Thanks for following. I did have a good time building these, even though I started out wondering if I could pull it off. It’s satisfying to walk down the hallway and see them.

Time to move on though. I have a garage entry door to do that’ll be thicker (1-3/4 inch), and a plan for a front entry door that will be fully custom.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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