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Delta Bench Top Jointer Problems

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Blog entry by RTV posted 05-08-2017 03:20 PM 668 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have a Delta 6” Table Top Jointer Model JT160. I put new blades in this week. I adjusted and readjusted more time than I can count. Not every time but maybe every 3rd pass it cuts a chunk out of the last inch of the board I’m jointing. Does anyone have an idea why?

-- Ray Vanderpool



6 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

556 posts in 2160 days


#1 posted 05-08-2017 05:26 PM

I know this may sound obvious. Are you jointing with the grain or against it? Whenever I get tear out at the end of the board it usually means I need to reverse direction on the board. I usually run my hand lightly along the edge to feel which way the wood fibers are aligned before I start. If it feels like you are getting stuck with slivers, you need to flip the board end-for-end.

How deep are you cutting on every pass? The more shallow the cut the better. I think mine is 1/32” or so.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View derosa's profile

derosa

1572 posts in 2648 days


#2 posted 05-08-2017 05:46 PM

Seems an obvious one but after setting the knives did you make sure the outfeed table was aligned flat to the edges of the blades at max height? Only time I’ve gotten tear out was when the outfeed was just a touch lower then the blades.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View RTV's profile

RTV

103 posts in 326 days


#3 posted 05-08-2017 06:35 PM


I know this may sound obvious. Are you jointing with the grain or against it? Whenever I get tear out at the end of the board it usually means I need to reverse direction on the board. I usually run my hand lightly along the edge to feel which way the wood fibers are aligned before I start. If it feels like you are getting stuck with slivers, you need to flip the board end-for-end.

How deep are you cutting on every pass? The more shallow the cut the better. I think mine is 1/32” or so.
It does it in either direction. I set it at 1/64 for hardwoods 1/32 for soft
- EarlS


-- Ray Vanderpool

View RTV's profile

RTV

103 posts in 326 days


#4 posted 05-08-2017 06:43 PM


I know this may sound obvious. Are you jointing with the grain or against it? Whenever I get tear out at the end of the board it usually means I need to reverse direction on the board. I usually run my hand lightly along the edge to feel which way the wood fibers are aligned before I start. If it feels like you are getting stuck with slivers, you need to flip the board end-for-end.

How deep are you cutting on every pass? The more shallow the cut the better. I think mine is 1/32” or so.
It does it in either direction. I usually do 1/64 on hardwood and 1/32 on soft.

- EarlS

I have set that so many time


Seems an obvious one but after setting the knives did you make sure the outfeed table was aligned flat to the edges of the blades at max height? Only time I ve gotten tear out was when the outfeed was just a touch lower then the blades.

- derosa


Seems an obvious one but after setting the knives did you make sure the outfeed table was aligned flat to the edges of the blades at max height? Only time I ve gotten tear out was when the outfeed was just a touch lower then the blades.

- derosa

I have checked a rechecked using a straight edge several times. I’m going to check again when I get home tonight.

-- Ray Vanderpool

View PPK's profile

PPK

822 posts in 621 days


#5 posted 05-09-2017 02:21 PM

You are getting snipe on the end. That is due to the outfeed table being set too low. To have no snipe, you actually need to have the outfeed side set just a fuzz (think like a couple thousandths) higher than the blades. And ALL 3 blades need to be at exactly the same height. Adjusting jointer blades is a PITA. Also, if your outfeed table doesn’t lock down really solid, (is there a set screw to lock it once you adjust the height?) that can cause it do deflect downward and cause snipe too…

I use a straight edge resting on the outfeed table, and then rotate the cutter head backward (so you don’t dullen your blades) and keep raising the outfeed table until I can’t feel any of the blades rubbing against the straight edge, then raise it just a hair higher. Test some boards, and adjust as needed. Once adjusted well, you should never get any snipe, unless you’re feeding improperly or have a machine that deflects under pressure.

-- Pete

View RTV's profile

RTV

103 posts in 326 days


#6 posted 05-11-2017 01:50 PM



You are getting snipe on the end. That is due to the outfeed table being set too low. To have no snipe, you actually need to have the outfeed side set just a fuzz (think like a couple thousandths) higher than the blades. And ALL 3 blades need to be at exactly the same height. Adjusting jointer blades is a PITA. Also, if your outfeed table doesn t lock down really solid, (is there a set screw to lock it once you adjust the height?) that can cause it do deflect downward and cause snipe too…

I use a straight edge resting on the outfeed table, and then rotate the cutter head backward (so you don t dullen your blades) and keep raising the outfeed table until I can t feel any of the blades rubbing against the straight edge, then raise it just a hair higher. Test some boards, and adjust as needed. Once adjusted well, you should never get any snipe, unless you re feeding improperly or have a machine that deflects under pressure.

- PPK

Thank and you were right one edge of one blade was just a little I mean little high. Thanks for the help.

-- Ray Vanderpool

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