LumberJocks

Hand tool tips and tricks #17: Using Leverage to Keep Things in Place.

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Blog entry by RGtools posted 482 days ago 1372 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 16: Dealing with a Bad End Vise, the Quick and Dirty Way Part 17 of Hand tool tips and tricks series Part 18: No Pencil Gauge? No Sweat. »

I believe it was Archimedes who once said “Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.” a more succinct way to say it would be, “levers are awesome”.

...but they don’t just move things.

Here I have set up a lever of sorts. The fulcrum being the bench dog, and the clamp being Archimedes. Because of mechanical advantage it would take a tremendous amount of force to move the lever from the end near my vise.

Why is this needed?

Because re-sawing oak with a coarse ripsaw generates a ton of force.

And it’s best that your stop not interfere with your saw.

After a fair amount of sawdust….

The end result.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan



13 comments so far

View terryR's profile

terryR

2988 posts in 913 days


#1 posted 482 days ago

Very useful tip…will record this in me brain for future use!

Thanks, Ryan.

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

3908 posts in 1056 days


#2 posted 482 days ago

Never occurred to my progressive Luddite mind to do this! Apparently you think before you act, I’m going to try this, the lever that is. I’m still working on the thinking part.
Great tip, thanks

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4137 posts in 1556 days


#3 posted 482 days ago

Another good suggestion, Ryan. Keep these coming.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4396 posts in 1045 days


#4 posted 478 days ago

The end result is a whole lot of sexy.

Awesome tip. Thank ya sir.

Did you actually keep sawing until you were between the jaws of the vise or was that picture just staged for the photo?

+1 Brandon.

p.s. I see a tool well in use and free of detritus. Are you attempting to appease the woodworking gods?

-- ~Tony

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1259 days


#5 posted 478 days ago

The tool well is full of junk on most occasions despite my efforts to keep it clean. The fact that you only see a few tools in there in the shot is pure freaking luck.

As far as if I saw inbetween the jaws of my vise. Yes I do, but not all the way through. Getting the stop out of the way of the saw allows me to get most of the way through the work before using a different tactic to finish the cut. By the time I am done, 1 end is cut though, both edges are cut through and the remaining end may have half it’s meat left. The remaining triangle inside the peice gets cut out using overhand sawing or by flipping the work over in the vise.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4396 posts in 1045 days


#6 posted 478 days ago

Sawing that far in between the jaws dose not bind the saw? I am going to have to try it.

I really like this entire tip; re-sawing is an awkward ordeal for me. Thanks bud.

-- ~Tony

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1259 days


#7 posted 478 days ago

If you hold by the corner of the wood you can get pretty far before you can feel binding. Time to finish off another way. If you keep flipping your work over you can get VERY far.

I also learned that bench sawing with the overhand approach works pretty quickly on longer stock. I’ll have to take a picture of that.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4396 posts in 1045 days


#8 posted 478 days ago

corner hold / flipping work …. okay i can totally see how it does not bind with that method. Thanks for the clarification.

Bench sawing? Is that the same as what you demonstrate in your occasional table class? I am a big fan of overhand for long cuts; less fatigue and better accuracy (in my experience).

-- ~Tony

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1259 days


#9 posted 477 days ago

Yes, I finally figured out a way to do resaw cuts at the bench. I will get a picture, but the set up works like this:

Saw for the first little bit as normal (as shown above). When a large enough kerf has be established, place the work on a batten attached to your bench leg and in your vise. The cut edge on the batten, the uncut edge in your vise, sitting on the first available guide rod (giving you more cut clearance). This racks your vise a tiny bit, but is actually helpful. Keep flipping your work around for accuracy until you can go no further. Finish as normal.

It might be mental trickery, but I swear this goes faster than cutting at the vise.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1694 days


#10 posted 477 days ago

I love the idea of you sharing these tips.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1259 days


#11 posted 477 days ago

Thanks Mads, it is a good tradition on this site, and I have enjoyed the dialogue that it usually starts.

Hope the world is treating you kindly.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4396 posts in 1045 days


#12 posted 477 days ago

I am looking forward to a picture so that i know i have the batten positioning correct. Thanks Ryan.

-- ~Tony

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1694 days


#13 posted 470 days ago

These days life is more than kind to me, infact I feel blessed in many fronts and are meeting steams of kindness.
Smiles,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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