LumberJocks

Hand tool tips and tricks #11: Reducing Fatigue During Rip Sessions

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by RGtools posted 03-13-2013 01:06 PM 1286 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Tweaks for a Lee Valley Vise Handle Part 11 of Hand tool tips and tricks series Part 12: Quick Glue Spreader »

Even the most seasoned sawyer can dread a long session of ripping down stock by hand. There are quite a few ways to prevent yourself from burning out, but my personal favorite is to use different muscle groups as I go along.

I will start by ripping on my saw-bench, kneeling on my work. As I go along I switch to this position.

It may look awkward, but it’s rather comfortable and gives you an excellent view of your saw for keeping it both plumb and on your cut line.

It’s hard to see, but you can actually use your thigh to brace your work at the end of the cut so it comes away cleanly.

A few other things you can do are:

1. Rip and crosscut your components in stages as opposed to all at once. Get those components all finished and ready to join and move to the next stage.

2. Use wax on your saw-plate, I forget to do this often, but I am always amazed by the difference this makes.

3. A tiny wedge like this one can take a lot of pressure off of your saw. Make a few dozen at a time, you will both use them and lose them.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan



9 comments so far

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4853 posts in 1131 days


#1 posted 03-13-2013 01:43 PM

I have and do use both the alternate positioning and the wedges. Both learned from your occasional table class. I’ll give the wax a try; i know it is a night and day difference on a plane sole. The thigh trick is not so easy on a sawbench but i am picking up what you are laying down.

Thank you for the tutelage Ryan.

-- ~Tony

View Julio 's profile

Julio

173 posts in 1571 days


#2 posted 03-13-2013 02:27 PM

Well done Ryan, I am very fun of that technique, Alan Breed inverse dovetailsaw usage reminds of this kind of french but the tooth geometry has to change to get the best of it.

I envy your gramercy holdfast by the way ;)

Keep it up my dear friend, my best wishes from my country

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1345 days


#3 posted 03-13-2013 04:27 PM

Tony, if you get a second sawbench you can also sit on your work and accomplish the same feat…a very nice trick on REALLY ong cuts.

Julio, in inverse dovetail saw thing is pretty intruging, but I have yet to find an oppurtunity to practice it. The holdfasts are cheap over here and they work very well after you sand the shank a bit. I am curious about the new ones that Lie Nielsen makes. If you end up grabbing those at some point, will you let me know how they work?

My best to you and yours.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Julio 's profile

Julio

173 posts in 1571 days


#4 posted 03-14-2013 08:36 AM

I like more gramercy ones than lienielsens though they look pretty consintent. These days I have purchased the sawvise from gramercy I think it´s essential to the the most of saw sharpening and I am excited to test it I am developing a new saw sharpening method that i have never seen ever before at any book or site.
Anyway all of the tools I will adquire it´s my pleasure to show you and talk about

See ya man !

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4853 posts in 1131 days


#5 posted 03-15-2013 02:00 PM

I will make a second one eventually, particularly because of how often you have mentioned that having two is useful. The next i build i will try the more simple style like you and Mauricio have made, with the round legs/wedged through M & T. Thank you for the tips.

-- ~Tony

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1345 days


#6 posted 03-15-2013 04:08 PM

I am a big fan of that style. They are very easy to produce and are exceedingly tough. I recently had about 600lbs of maple stacked on my two benches (then I crawled on top of that because I needed a tool on the other side).

Not too shabby for a couple hours of work.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5353 posts in 1289 days


#7 posted 03-15-2013 06:49 PM

Do you own a table saw Ryan? While I am just beginning to “collect” hand saws, I have a Veritas set of 3 and a Japanese set of 3. In my mind, I think I would probably draw the line at significant rips. I am a wuss…and I am good with that. Respect for the tough guys out there getting it done by hand. Real men, for sure

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1345 days


#8 posted 03-15-2013 07:09 PM

I do own a table saw…which at some point I should sell, I don’t use it.

I really don’t have the room to use it comfortably. If I could have my way, I would have a bandsaw, a Jointer/planer/mortiser (Laguna’s is pretty), and I would accomplish all the rest by hand (which includes most stock prep, but it would be nice to have the machines at the ready for larger projects with lots of matching parts). I will say this, having the ability to do this sort of thing is still a valuable tool even with machines on staff and at the ready. I like that I can handle all my cutting jobs with a few vintage saws (I think my core kit cost well under $100).

I have a ton of stock right now that I need to resaw for the tills in my chest…and I keep putting it off. I keep hoping a bandsaw will magicly appear. In the mean time, I think I might have to sharpen my 4.5 ppi rip soon.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Brit's profile

Brit

5221 posts in 1533 days


#9 posted 03-16-2013 11:52 AM

Good advice Ryan.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase