LumberJocks

Workshop upgrades #4: WWII Era German Handplane

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by RGtools posted 11-25-2011 05:57 PM 4838 reads 0 times favorited 57 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Now serving 38 Part 4 of Workshop upgrades series no next part

Have you ever wanted something for a solid year without pulling the trigger? Day before yesterday I had to make a quick run into town with my wife and I finally decided this had to come home with me.

This tool was loved. All I did before shooting this was set the wedge. Sharpening an old tool before sale is unheard of in this neck of the woods…but such a treat to come across. I made a point to write a note to the seller and let him know it’s going to a home where it’s going to get used.

Not quite used to the hammer adjust for this plane…there is a courting period so to speak where you and the tool learn each others story. Looking forward to getting to know this one.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan



57 comments so far

View Brit's profile

Brit

5220 posts in 1532 days


#1 posted 11-25-2011 06:06 PM

Up periscope!!! Nice plane Ryan, but I don’t understand why you waited a year to get it. What’s wrong with you man? :-)

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1344 days


#2 posted 11-25-2011 06:12 PM

Don’t know. (other than I am a total cheapskate and the guy wanted $70 bucks at first). He dropped it to $50 and I did not want someone else to take it this weekend. Did you notice the way the sole is attached? Very Groovy.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1687 days


#3 posted 11-25-2011 06:21 PM

I will bet the iron quality is very good in that plane. Will keep the edge.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Brit's profile

Brit

5220 posts in 1532 days


#4 posted 11-25-2011 06:28 PM

No, I couldn’t see how the sole is attached very clearly in the video. I kept blinking every time a shaving came hurtling towards me. Can you post a photo when you have time? No rush.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 11-26-2011 02:04 AM

Brit you shall never use the periscope on full enlargement …. :-)

Ryan great little plane you have got there 50$ though is a little expencive
remember to give the wedge a tiny gentle tap too
I couldn´t see if it was a jack or smoother in the gap on the mouth
but no matter what you can always make a new sole to it if you want it to be a smother
and you can using it reversed as a pull plane if you want becourse of the horn its relative
easy to do it the few times you need to do it with out wanting to flip the board around

thanks for sharing
Dennis

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1642 days


#6 posted 11-26-2011 03:34 PM

Ah Ulmias, such a great plane. I got a bunch of them when I was stationed in Germany. Went sorting out some boxes from our move and came across a bunch that I need to part with (duplicates). The Ulmias have great irons in them. Really think, and quality steel. They hold an edge unlike any Stanley blades I have ever seen. There is a bit of a learning curve setting the irons with a hammer, but once you get them right, these are some sweet planes. Nice find, RG.

-- Mike

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

568 posts in 1189 days


#7 posted 11-26-2011 04:12 PM

Hi everybody,

Nice plane.

This plane looks like the planes currently produced by ULMIA
http://www.ulmia.de/English/Ulmia-Hobel.htm
According to they web site :
“Plane body made of steamed red beech, pearwood or white beech depending on the model, with strong, deep, and pointed inclined toothing, glued-on plane sole in white beech or lignum vitae.”

I have bought a similar looking plane made by Goldenberg in Lorraine(FRANCE), I paid it 5 Euro (about 6.5$) on a flee market in Brussels. Unfortunately the previous user has visibly bent the iron while whacking it violently with a hammer. I still have to try to straighten it and to sharpen it.
Goldenberg wich was founded around 1848 was bought by Stanley France in 1986.

Lorraine is a region which has been alternatively part of France or Germany in the two previous centuries. So depending on its age a Goldenberg plane might be French or German.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1536 posts in 2151 days


#8 posted 11-26-2011 04:29 PM

What a great story and wonderful plane to have in your possession. Herzlichen Glückwunsch zu Ihrer schönen und historischen Handwerkzeug.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1344 days


#9 posted 11-26-2011 06:42 PM

Andy, the sole has a wavy joint…makes sense from the standpoint of maximizing glue surface.

Sylvain. I thought the angle was a bit higher and it looks like I was right (49 degrees), thanks for the link it helps me do a bit of research.

Dennis. Light taps are the way to go.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1344 days


#10 posted 11-27-2011 03:37 AM

Scweib.

Sie ist ein schönes Werkzeug. Dank.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6845 posts in 1841 days


#11 posted 11-28-2011 05:41 PM

RG this thing is awesome! I’m jealous. does it have the adjustable mouth? That one is on my list of dream planes for sure!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1344 days


#12 posted 11-28-2011 07:05 PM

No adjustment on the mouth that I can figure. (possible though, but it looks to be glued in place). for true smoothing work it needs to be repaced (no big deal) but I ahve not decided quite what role I want this plane to play in my shop yet.

I love the high angle though. makes a big difference in difficult wood….hmm

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6845 posts in 1841 days


#13 posted 11-28-2011 07:17 PM

I say that is your plane for that dificult grain on the walnut. Tighten up that mouth and you have a nice plane to dedicate to tricky grained wood.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Brit's profile

Brit

5220 posts in 1532 days


#14 posted 11-28-2011 08:48 PM

I’m with Mauricio. Around 50 degrees is a great angle for straight-grained walnut, cherry or ebony or any other moderately dense hardwood.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1344 days


#15 posted 11-28-2011 10:43 PM

I am inclided to agree with you other than is just works so well as a scrub. It just feels right. Ugly as sin but it feels right.

I have an old stanley with a back bevel that will handle the walnut (even though that idea went down the tubes because of the wavy grain on the boards intended for the legs.)...oh well a Beech and Sapele desk sounds fine to me.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

showing 1 through 15 of 57 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase