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Occasional Table Class (Hand Tool Build) #11: Sharpening with Jigs Video

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Blog entry by RGtools posted 1025 days ago 3596 reads 4 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Sharpening and a lesson in humility Part 11 of Occasional Table Class (Hand Tool Build) series Part 12: Freehand Sharpening Video »

One thing I forgot to mention in the video is that you can grind a heavy camber into you jack plane by rocking the jig side to side during the grinding process (80grit and 220 stage). All your other tools can have straight edges but you need a good camber on you jack plane (something that lets you take 16th-8th cuts without the corners digging in) or it just wont do it’s job right.

Sorry this took so long to get posted but editing video is taking more time and brainpower than I can safely allot this time of year. I will be posting the second half of this video on freehand techniques as rapidly as time permits. However, realizing that I am human and October is looming nearer than I would like, I am going to go ahead and link some required reading/watching. This is a tough concession to make but quite frankly making sure all your tools are in great working order is a class in and of itself (that I quite frankly, don’t have the time to teach…maybe a job for Gepetto?)

For sharpening with jigs:Deneb from Lie Nielsen using the same jig I did. Albeit with a much better film crew…you have to start somewhere.

Tools for working wood put out a wonderful guide for freehand techniques. This is the best resource I know of online.

Bob Rozieski Created a very comprehensive podcast (where you could honestly spend hours on end) that goes into sharpening everything under the sun as well as the proper use of hand-tools.

This is a very good manual for sharpening saws.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan



15 comments so far

View Julio Alonso Diaz's profile

Julio Alonso Diaz

173 posts in 1464 days


#1 posted 1024 days ago

Good tips Ryan, I enjoyed the vid, you are working hard on these classes, thanks for sharing

-- El hombre que amo la madera. http://aulaflamingo.wordpress.com/

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2406 days


#2 posted 1024 days ago

Ryan, this was an interesting and informative video. I picked up quite a bit of useful information from watching it.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View woodzy's profile

woodzy

413 posts in 1262 days


#3 posted 1024 days ago

Thanks for the new class. The video had a lot of good information, the link were great and all consuming like usual.

-- Anthony

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#4 posted 1024 days ago

Thanks guys. I really apreciate it. I know I have been putting quite a bit into the tools section of this class but as I was discussing with my wife “they don’t just plug in”. They have to be sharpened and set up right to work at all (and then you have to use them right). I will put as much of my own content out there before the build starts in the second half of October but I wanted to make sure you had some resourses to draw from should we run out of time.

The freehand video is going much more quickly so I should have that posted within the next day or two.

I forgot to mention it since this function was added after my class started. If you go to the Class tab and hit the subscribe button you should not miss any installments of the class.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#5 posted 1023 days ago

Thanks Gary. I am getting better at the software…thank goodness but I still have a lot to learn.

Like I said the jig is just one more think to fuss with. Freehand is nice just because you can grab the tool sharpen it and get back to work.

Are you talking about the Shapton 30k or something else? At this point I am married to my oil stones but I did certainly ponder those Shaptons.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#6 posted 1023 days ago

I could not agree more, even taking the $200 I did was painful (but worth it)

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View mafe's profile

mafe

9413 posts in 1673 days


#7 posted 1021 days ago

Nice video.
Wonderful stop you have.
But why should you want to buy one of these cheramic stones if you have a strap?
If you want a cheramic stone look at supplyers of shaving gear they sell them a lot cheaper.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#8 posted 1021 days ago

Mads. The stones I use are natural Arkansas Noviculite (as least my two finest stones are), The polish on those is pretty impressive to me and for rough work I stop there. But for work that requires a bit more finesse, I like to strop my tools. When I do the edges last longer and perform better.

Ceramic’s are a good way to go too. As long as your system gets you to a keen edge you are golden.

Best thoughts back at you,

Ryan

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View mafe's profile

mafe

9413 posts in 1673 days


#9 posted 1021 days ago

Ryan it was not meant as a question for you but for Garypr, sorry to be ‘unsharp’.
I just have the feeling that a strop can do it as fine as these cheramic stones.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#10 posted 1021 days ago

A hah! Thanks for the clarification. I just totally did not connect the dots. Sorry about that. I really would not be the person to ask on this as I have made my piece with the stop. Gary…any input on why you want those stones so badly…(other than the insane polish straight from the stone)

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3503 posts in 1062 days


#11 posted 1014 days ago

nice class ! i prefer a machine though the tormek jet grizzly and work-sharp are in my shop now. i am working on a couple of more to test. i tested several stones as well, i don’t think i can put a set of stones into the price of a tormek that can do so much more than hand stones like yours. they cant do planer blades drill bits shears loppers etc however i did like a hand stone though it was a diamond Wheatstone i loved the stone from trend and the ones from DMT they were both top shelf items. i also used the dmt disk for the work-sharp oh my god that thing is awesome it is fast and cool and cool is one advantage that hand work has say over a dry grinder the other thing is turning tools the systems do a faster better job than hand stones on all turning tools. another tool i liked a lot was the m power pss1 it was fast at putting a micro bevel and for the quick re honing of a blade it is very sweet it also uses diamonds from DMT again i liked the class it was fun to watch but i feel the methods are out dated IMHO

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#12 posted 1014 days ago

TheDude: glad you enjoyed flipping through the class. The Tormek style tools are a good investment if you work in a hybridized shop (the ease of sharpening your planer blades is worth the cost) however, I cannot justify their cost for my shop.

A hand cranked grinder (as shown in the next post) and a set of GOOD stones can do turning tools, chisels, planes, drawknives, axes, skew chisels…basically the scope of a hand tool arsenal is covered. (of course once you snag some molding planes and some carving tools you will need slip stones as well). Honestly I don’t think a machine set up would be faster than free-handing a chisel on a good set of stones. In the videos I take a bit longer than I need to sharpen each tool in order to give me time to explain what I am doing, but when I am in the shop it takes me all of about 45 seconds to refresh an edge (no grinding) and about 3 minutes to re-stablish and grind/hone a tool….It’s fast enough for me.

If you like your machines, great, whatever gets you to an edge, but they are just not my cup of tea. As far as my methods being out dated, I do hand tool work…I am already outdated, my shop just matches me :).

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3503 posts in 1062 days


#13 posted 1014 days ago

I don’t mean to insult you. I use a mix of tools and methods. I agree hand stones have their place. i use them too i do so many tools that hand work is not the only method I use.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#14 posted 1014 days ago

No insult taken.

Happy shavings.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1238 days


#15 posted 418 days ago

Video has been re-uploaded on this one.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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