LumberJocks

Progress of a self taught cabinet maker #2: Took the 50 home.

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by RGtools posted 03-22-2011 04:09 AM 3290 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Tools, wood and a great payoff Part 2 of Progress of a self taught cabinet maker series Part 3: Mobile workstation »

It’s rare when you can take a vintage tool home for a good price it’s incredible when you can a take vintage tool home and it requires no tune up.

I finally found a plow plane. I haven’t even sharpened the blades yet and it makes good shavings. A sharpening session and a good coat of oil is all this guy needs.

Of course I need to make a box for the blades…and maybe another shelf.

There’s always more work and that makes me smile.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan



12 comments so far

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1545 days


#1 posted 03-22-2011 06:19 AM

A box for the blades? What, and leave the plane out in the cold?\

For shame!

Build a nice fitted box they all can snuggle up in together.

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2303 posts in 1437 days


#2 posted 03-22-2011 12:49 PM

Tiny.. Maybe someone could knit it a sock ?

And I whole heartedly agree, finding one at any price than needs a very little care is RARE !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View David LaBolle's profile

David LaBolle

199 posts in 1328 days


#3 posted 03-22-2011 01:04 PM

THat is an old Stanley 45. I think I have the same one. No notch in the blade, right? Blade held tight with a brass wingnut bolt?

I’m glad I have the one I do, I dated it to have been manufactured between 1888 and 1889.

However, if anyone is looking to pick up a stanley 45 plow plane, I recommend you get one of the nickle plated ones with a notch in the top of the blade and a threaded blade depth adjuster on top.

The very old ones, like I have, and the one you seem to have, slip out of adjustment as you are using them, and that is reason why that model was made for such a short time before they updated the design.

Here is a link to a YouTube video of a guy who has the same plow plane and he goes through setting up, adjusting, and using it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CI9cFnmRdA&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1772 days


#4 posted 03-22-2011 03:05 PM

congrat´s with your new toy :-)

Dennis

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#5 posted 03-22-2011 03:15 PM

I have a nice plane shelf for the plane but the thought has crossed my mind for making a box for all of it; no clue where I would keep the box though.

I could knit the sock but I would have to shear a goat first, (not to mention cleaning and spinning the mohair). I’d rather build the box.

It’s actually a no 50 and it seems to have a bit more of a positive adjustment. I’ll shoot some video once it’s sharp. Thanks for the link.

Toy+tool=Toyl, I love my new toyl.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Joe Watson's profile

Joe Watson

315 posts in 2203 days


#6 posted 03-22-2011 07:48 PM

I have a stanley 50 I am conditioning for work again. it is a fun contraption.

-- Got Wood?

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1654 days


#7 posted 03-22-2011 08:25 PM

Yours is a #50 with rosewood handle. The earlier #50 were nickel plated, the first ones were jappaned.
In 1936 the lever to help adjust the blade was introduced, this helped fine tune the blade for cutting. Originally the #50 was designed to be a “beading plane”. In early 1900’s tongue and groove blade was added, then in 1914 straight cutters were introduced.I have mine set up for beading, adjusting these can be time consuming. It is a nice small little toy !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#8 posted 03-23-2011 04:53 AM

I’ll be using mine mostly for joinery. I like my 45 but it’s a bit bulky in the hand for most things. Thanks for the info, any good sites for this thing to figure out a date of production?

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Joe Watson's profile

Joe Watson

315 posts in 2203 days


#9 posted 03-23-2011 04:33 PM

so far I havent seen any sites for dating these planes however I have an idea from patrick leaches site on the age of mine just from his description of the plane. I think possible the wooden handled versions were the last models made. the metal “fish scale” handle i believe was before that. mine has the scroll work metal handle and had black japanning which was the earliest of this plane.

http://www.supertool.com/stanleybg/stan7.htm#num50

“The first full production planes are japanned, have the decorative floral motif (identical to that of the #48, #78, et al) cast into the handle, and have no depth stop. Ca. 1890, the plane was nickel plated, while retaining the floral motif. Ca. 1910, the floral motif was dropped for the common fish-scale pattern, and it’s at this time that plane became more general purpose by the addition of the ploughing cutters. During the second World War, the planes were japanned due to the shortage of nickel, and it’s possible to find planes fitted with a mix of finishes; i.e., a japanned fence on a nickeled body. Starting around 1945 it was offered with a rosewood tote until the end of its production when hardwood was substituted as the handle.”

-- Got Wood?

View David LaBolle's profile

David LaBolle

199 posts in 1328 days


#10 posted 03-23-2011 06:38 PM

Check out this link. Patrick’s “Blood and Gore” on the Stanley #50

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan7.htm#num50

And here is the page of Patrick’s masses of info on all the other Stanley planes:

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1311 days


#11 posted 03-24-2011 03:36 AM

Oh my god. So much drooling to do. My wife probably thinks I have a problem.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View David LaBolle's profile

David LaBolle

199 posts in 1328 days


#12 posted 03-25-2011 10:44 AM

Forget the sock. You just may want to think about making a box to hold it.

I just finished making one for my old Stanley #45.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/46452

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase