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DELTA SCROLL SAW 40-440

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Blog entry by RBWoodworker posted 10-14-2009 07:18 AM 15945 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Has anyone ever seen, or heard of a scroll saw by Delta model 40-440? it’s an older model saw from around 20 plus years ago

I have an opportunity to buy one for around 300 and want to know if it’s worth it.. I am taking a marquetry class and I will be needing a scroll saw to do this type of work.. the instructor says that his favorite scroll saw is the older spring top models which I think this is..

if anyone needs a picture..I have a few that I can send to you to see..

Thanks for helping me on this..Randy

-- Randall Child http://www.racfurniture.com/



13 comments so far

View woodspyder's profile

woodspyder

80 posts in 3090 days


#1 posted 10-14-2009 08:45 AM

I have a 40-440, it is a very reliable saw, I also have a smaller 40-150 saw 15”. If I did a “lot” of scrolling the 440 is the saw I would use.

PROS
1. Size – 24” is a monster in the scroll saw world.
2. It will cut anything you throw at it.
3. Smooth – if tuned up it runs like a sewing machine.
4. Reliability – It is an industrial saw it was made to run all day long, and will if you need it to.
5. It makes cuts as smooth as glass. My first test cuts were in 3/4” mesquite a very hard wood.

CONS
1. The height is kind of awkward. You almost have to stand while using it. I have tried sitting on a bar stool but I am not comfortable in that position. May just be me.
2. Also it is not as easy to change the blade in a 40-440 as in any of the newer saws. Part of this for me is my eyes are not so good any more.
3. Size – it takes a lot of space. I know I have size listed in both !!!
4. It is getting harder to find replacement parts. I broke the lower blade clamp and had to make one.
5. It is very heavy too, with stand it’s over 100lbs.

There are probably other Pros/Cons this is just a start, and all IMHO.

-- Measure three times, cut twice.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2521 posts in 2898 days


#2 posted 10-14-2009 02:15 PM

I’ve seen the coveted Delta scrol saw on sale for $475. That’s a bit more, but at that price does it make a 20 year old saw worth $300?
I don’t have that answer as I don’t really know either saw. Just throwing it out.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#3 posted 10-14-2009 03:42 PM

Personally I think I would rather spend my money on a modern scroll saw with a variable speed motor, quick change blade arrangement and a guarantee. I have a fairly new Delta (don’t remember the series no. offhand) and I like it a lot, but a lot of pros seem to like DeWalt’s best model. However, I suggest you surf the web a bit to see what is available and maybe read some reviews before you buy. For me, the quick blade change feature alone would be a deal breaker. Having said all this, I have no experience with the Delta 440.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Bothus's profile

Bothus

439 posts in 2637 days


#4 posted 10-14-2009 07:23 PM

Hi Woodsyder,

I have only used a scroll saw a couple of times and it was Delta 40-601. Not sure what the differences are but this one was varible speed and changing the blade wasn’t all that difficult… but I’ve never tried any other so I’m not sure how easy it should be.

Here’s a video of the saw I took when I was working on monogramed sound holes for the GFC:

-- Jerry Boshear, Professional Kitchen Designer, amature woodworker.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3037 days


#5 posted 10-14-2009 08:20 PM

Hey Randy
I don’t use a scroll saw very often but have been somewhat surprised when at the local high school that I volunteer at they have both a hawk brand and dewalt both I have heard great reviews on but the thing that seems strange that on a $100 delta’s blades are so much easier to change then a $650 and $1200 saws, so before I would buy any scroll saw I would check that aspect of the saw out first since that’s all you do when scrolling saw is put the blade in an out of your work.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3046 days


#6 posted 10-14-2009 08:52 PM

Scroll saws well the modern should be better than the older ones shouldn’t they? .However I have a very modern expensive Delta scroll saw and find the quick change blade holders a real pita, sorry but so far its just been a nightmare getting the blades to hold with it . Now when I pull the lever across to finally lock the blade, the blade pops back out it of the holder time after time after time. It must be me right ? The book is about as clear on this point of blade locking with respect to the lever as mud.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#7 posted 10-14-2009 09:10 PM

Alistair, either you don’t have sufficient clamping pressure under the table or too much pressure on your tensioning lever on top. Another problem could be that you are either putting the blade too deep into the bottom clamp or not deep enough depending on where your blade is popping out. I also push the top clamp down when putting in a blade to make sure it is securely in the clamp. I have a Delta with the quick release lever. and I have been using it for about 5 years now with no problems.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View RBWoodworker's profile

RBWoodworker

432 posts in 2812 days


#8 posted 10-14-2009 10:44 PM

Thank you for all the input guys..I guess the reason for me looking into this older model saw is because according to the Marquetry teacher.. the newer saws have a sort of oscillating motion that moves forward and backwards during the cut..and the older spring top saws have a straight up and down true cutting motion.. I guess that’s necessary to get perfect cuts out of a stacked of veneer when doing marquetry as it allows them to fit back into their slots perfectly.. this is what he says..

They can be used to cut up to 16 layers of veneer at once in a good quality scroll saw such as an older model Powermatic or Delta Milwaukee ‘spring top’ scroll saw (my favorite). The Eclipse (a new type of vertical travel saw), Hegner, Excalabur, Dewalt or Delta scroll saw are my second choices. The reason that I like the older spring top saws is that the blade has a perfectly vertical travel. This allows one to precisely cut thick packets of veneer of up to 16 layers with a minimum of saw kerf width, and be assured that you can take all the interchangeable pieces of the veneer puzzle and assemble them back together again for a perfect fit. The double arm or pivoting arm system that most scrollsaws possess have the blade moving front to back in a slightly orbital fashion and usually have no blade backing guides for precise cutting, but are still quite good for marquetry if properly used. A momentary ‘on/off’ foot switch is very useful when using this saw for intricate cutting, changing directions of the cut, and stopping the noise when the blade brakes. this was taken from Paul Schurchs website. Now Maybe I’m making a bigger deal out of all this, but I guess when you don’t know.. you listen to the expert and try and go with their advise..

I want to hear more and be proven wrong..I value everyone’s comments..

-- Randall Child http://www.racfurniture.com/

View Barry Crowe's profile

Barry Crowe

66 posts in 1289 days


#9 posted 05-30-2013 09:56 PM

I am buying one of these too. The one I have lined up that came from a school and was never used. It is practically new and for $300, I’m jumping on it. These are pro machines and plus saves me the hassle of changing blades on my band saw every time I want to cut a piece of brass or need a finer cut on a wood component. At worst, it appears I can flip it in my market for double what I will pay. Buy it now and you won’t regret it….I think.

-- Supercrowe

View Barry Crowe's profile

Barry Crowe

66 posts in 1289 days


#10 posted 06-04-2013 10:31 PM

The guy ended up taking it to an auction because he could sell it for more than $300. Gosh dang it!!!

-- Supercrowe

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3140 posts in 1329 days


#11 posted 06-05-2013 12:41 AM

I don’t know enough to say if this is the saw, but I did see it on my local CL in Jacksonville, FL. Looks like it is still available. $200

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/50308

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View PatrickB's profile

PatrickB

52 posts in 2408 days


#12 posted 03-27-2016 02:02 AM

Try these guys, they have a pretty good list of replacement parts.Pat

http://www.ereplacementparts.com/delta-rockwell-40440-type-industrial-scroll-saw-parts-c-3275_3505_4044.html


I have a 40-440, it is a very reliable saw, I also have a smaller 40-150 saw 15”. If I did a “lot” of scrolling the 440 is the saw I would use.

PROS
1. Size – 24” is a monster in the scroll saw world.
2. It will cut anything you throw at it.
3. Smooth – if tuned up it runs like a sewing machine.
4. Reliability – It is an industrial saw it was made to run all day long, and will if you need it to.
5. It makes cuts as smooth as glass. My first test cuts were in 3/4” mesquite a very hard wood.

CONS
1. The height is kind of awkward. You almost have to stand while using it. I have tried sitting on a bar stool but I am not comfortable in that position. May just be me.
2. Also it is not as easy to change the blade in a 40-440 as in any of the newer saws. Part of this for me is my eyes are not so good any more.
3. Size – it takes a lot of space. I know I have size listed in both !!!
4. It is getting harder to find replacement parts. I broke the lower blade clamp and had to make one.
5. It is very heavy too, with stand it s over 100lbs.

There are probably other Pros/Cons this is just a start, and all IMHO.

- woodspyder

-- Really? Really? How important is it?

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#13 posted 03-27-2016 08:15 PM

A real classic.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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