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Method to shiplap siding for a new workshop??

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Blog entry by Quebecnewf posted 06-01-2008 01:40 PM 10532 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I would like to shiplap the roof boards for my new workshop roof. This is approx 1200 sq ft of one inch softwood lumber. My reason for doing this is the fact that after I board in the roof I know there will be quite a bit of shrinkage and as the cracks open up I will be able to see up through them and the blue styrofoam insulation will be visible from the shop floor in these seams. I want to avoid this if possible and the only way I can think of is to ship lap the boards.

My question is what would be the best way to do this. I have three options with the tools I have.

Option 1: is a dado head on my table saw. I have a cheap dado set and I would not be worried about the roughness of the cut. Has anyone done this and if so waht are your thoughts?

Option 2 : Stack approx 4 skil saw blades on the table saw and use them in place of the dado head. I have not tried this out but some of these 7 1/4” cheap blades really zip through the wood. Thoughts??

Option 3: Use a hand or table mounted router. This would work but I don’t know if the router could stand all this heavy usage. Thoughts???

Quebecnewf



18 comments so far

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 3205 days


#1 posted 06-01-2008 02:02 PM

I think option 1 would work the best. Set up to use the max width of the stack. That way it will give you a good lap, even if the edges are not completely straight. Option 2 would put a lot of strain on your saw.

View Quebecnewf's profile

Quebecnewf

100 posts in 3338 days


#2 posted 06-01-2008 02:12 PM

A question why would option 2 put more strain on the saw. The same amount of wood is being removed

Quebecnewf

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3760 days


#3 posted 06-01-2008 02:21 PM

If you have a jointer with a rabbeting ledge, try that.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1770 posts in 3550 days


#4 posted 06-01-2008 02:44 PM

Option 1 with a sacrificial fence and feather boards. One feather board will hold the work down and the other will hold the work tight to the fence. Then get someone else to unload the saw at the other end.

The other option is to tongue and groove the wood. A lot of roof sheathing is tongue and groove. You can do this with the table saw under less strain since it is a smaller cut. Though there are two set ups.

Option four which I have done and don’t really recommend, is use the jointing rabbeting feature of a jointer if you have one. They make very smooth cuts, but it is tiring.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Quebecnewf's profile

Quebecnewf

100 posts in 3338 days


#5 posted 06-01-2008 02:52 PM

A jointer would be too slow. This is a 1200 ft job. This wood is green fir. It has been air drying for a few weeks but is still very green.
T&G would also be too slow i think and you would have to run the boards on their edge through the table saw , not an easy setup.

Looks like its the dado head on the table saw.

Quebecnewf

View stanley2's profile

stanley2

335 posts in 3256 days


#6 posted 06-01-2008 04:20 PM

I would not use the table saw with green wood because I think you will get uneven rabbets. I would use the router with the fence mounted off the back edge. You may have to take two passes to get your depth of cut. This is a straight walk down the board with chips flying. My router of choice is the Porter Cable 690 and I have no doubt it could do the job in a cake walk. It would be easier if the boards were not loaded with moisture – suspect you will get a lot of furring but don’t be afraid to make a back cut to get rid of some of that. Stick with a half-inch shank cutter.

-- Phil in British Columbia

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 3170 days


#7 posted 06-01-2008 05:47 PM

to shiplap, #1, if it comes out rough—I am suspecting that the boards are rough cut also? another thought put down a layer of roofing felt (tar paper), or paint the bottom of the blue styrofoam board black. I suspect that would be the quickest and easiest solution. might be cheaper than burning out a router . . . or taking a chunk out of your body

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View Quebecnewf's profile

Quebecnewf

100 posts in 3338 days


#8 posted 06-01-2008 06:31 PM

what would putting down tar paper do I would see black tar paper instead of blue sty. The boards are rough sawed and a rough shiplap is not a problem. My main reason for the shiplap is to avoid being able to look up through the wood so to speak.

A router seems to be too slight a tool for this job and no router works good on green wood

QUebecnewf

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3760 days


#9 posted 06-01-2008 06:32 PM

Does anyone make shiplap sheathing anymore, or has plywood taken over?

I haven’t noticed it in the lumberyards lately.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View ChicoWoodnut's profile

ChicoWoodnut

904 posts in 3276 days


#10 posted 06-01-2008 06:53 PM

Have you checked the math?

Here is what I think (I may be wrong LOL)

I don’t know the dimensions of your lumber but assuming it is 6” wide.

1200 sq ft X 2 lf ft/sq ft = 2400 lf.

Now since you need to mill both sides of each board you are up to 4800 lf, shy of a mile by 480’.

How many dado blades and table saws would you wear out milling that much lumber?

Do you have a company that mills moulding anywhere near? They might tool up for a run that large.

-- Scott - Chico California http://chicowoodnut.home.comcast.net

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3449 days


#11 posted 06-01-2008 06:56 PM

Table saw would be the fastest.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View ChicoWoodnut's profile

ChicoWoodnut

904 posts in 3276 days


#12 posted 06-01-2008 06:58 PM

Dang Gary,

I was hoping the engineer would check my math.

-- Scott - Chico California http://chicowoodnut.home.comcast.net

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3449 days


#13 posted 06-01-2008 07:04 PM

I don’t do math anymore, I’m retired. :-)

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3560 days


#14 posted 06-01-2008 09:26 PM

I’m not retired but the math element is making me tired.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Quebecnewf's profile

Quebecnewf

100 posts in 3338 days


#15 posted 06-01-2008 10:39 PM

It does seem a bit of a daunting task. I had a guy on another site who said he did all the siding for a 28×48 barn with a handheld router.
I did a few little test boards on my TS today and it seemed to go good not to much load on the saw and I had a good feed rate going.
I think the TS is more than up to the task and the dado stack is brand new but a very crappy one so I don’t mind running it for this job.The boards are for the most part 1×6 so the cut would be 1/4 in wide by approx 1/2 deep.
Quebecnewf

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