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Frame Saw Build #6: stressed out... or not enough?

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Blog entry by PurpLev posted 05-27-2012 08:09 PM 4231 reads 4 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Sawing the Saw Part 6 of Frame Saw Build series no next part

With the blade cut and drilled to length, and the frame shaped and finished (BLO) it was time to add some tension to the frame to pull on the blade.

I was toying with some ideas, and ended up getting an IKEA steel wire hanger as the tension control. It’s quite simple, and uses 2 threaded ends one left hand one right hand, both pulling on the wire:

Putting tension on the blade using this method is not as easy I was hoping it would be and requires a pin to roate and thread those metal ends into their mating studs… I may end up just putting a standard hemp thread there at some point with a paddle, but test cuts were not bad, although the blade can rotate pretty easily – at least easier than I would like to. I’m not sure if this is due to not enough tension on the blade, or if that’s just how it is (never had a frame saw to compare to). I am guessing this is due to insufficient tension though… so again – may go for hemp thread with paddle later on:

The saw is surprisingly lightweight and feels very comfortable in use more so than I expected even with all the stainless steel hardware, although now that I used it – for size, I think I’ll make another smaller one for joinery (was hoping to have an all-in-one joinery+general cuts saw). For now this will work for what I need it for though:

Next I milled and rounded some mahogany for the handles. here is rough initial rounding with a #5:

I then turned it to size and shape, and drilled the core to accept the 1/2” stainless steel blade clips:

and Viola, the saw is complete (well, I do need to glue in the handles to the clips, but other that it’s done):

Thanks for watching,
Peace.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.



16 comments so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

11103 posts in 1692 days


#1 posted 05-27-2012 08:18 PM

Ill take mine in ash Purp ;).

That looks liks its going to be a well added tool in the arsenal of wood assaulting items.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4844 posts in 2568 days


#2 posted 05-27-2012 09:44 PM

Nice Purp.
That Ikea wire thingie looks interesting. I need to keep that in mind.

Overall though, the saw looks wonderful. I bet it will take some practice to get her to sing.
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Lenny's profile

Lenny

1268 posts in 2213 days


#3 posted 05-27-2012 10:15 PM

Stellar job Sharon! You have created one beautiful homemade tool. Clearly something to be proud of.

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

View Karson's profile

Karson

34886 posts in 3086 days


#4 posted 05-28-2012 01:19 AM

Great looking. Way to keep your eyes out for re-purposed attachments.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1684 days


#5 posted 05-28-2012 02:21 AM

That is great for a turning saw but I don’t think you will be able to get enough tension for the wide blades to cut well. My store bought ones have arms that are about 1-1/2 in wide by a bit over 3/4 thick. It takes quite a bit of tension for those wide blades.

As to the turning blade, I dunno. Mine stay put pretty well. The store bought ones have wooden pins (with metal plates and have quite a bit of friction. My little turning saw seems to not turn with tension but I thing that it is being pinned by racking the arms when tightening.

I converted the ones I bought that came with a threaded tensioner over to line tensioner. The threaded ones just never felt right to me.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

566 posts in 1185 days


#6 posted 05-28-2012 09:13 AM

To prevent unwanted handle rotation,
You may try puting O-rings

see the 5th picture on this blog :

http://cornishworkshop.blogspot.com/2012/01/oooo-la-la.html

or lock washers.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View 489tad's profile

489tad

2395 posts in 1697 days


#7 posted 05-28-2012 12:29 PM

Very nice all the way around. Thanks for posting.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2334 days


#8 posted 05-28-2012 02:19 PM

hmm, thts interesting Sylvain – I was doing some modifications to the saw to have more wood-to-wood friction between handles and frame, but if thats not going to change much, I’ll check out the o-ring idea – thats brilliant- thanks!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9554 posts in 1775 days


#9 posted 05-29-2012 11:21 AM

Wonderful build, I really love it.
Yes now you just have to build a set.
I lso love using the frame saws, just bought a bunch that I will restore so no more builds for me.
Hope life is sweet to you – peace,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2334 days


#10 posted 05-29-2012 01:26 PM

Thanks Mads. I think you had your fair share of building them – so you can take a rest ;)

Hope the new place is full of love

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6841 posts in 1837 days


#11 posted 05-29-2012 05:55 PM

Great build Purp, I envy your metal working abilities.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View mafe's profile

mafe

9554 posts in 1775 days


#12 posted 05-30-2012 03:38 PM

;-) life is sweet.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2334 days


#13 posted 05-30-2012 04:18 PM

David in reference to:
That is great for a turning saw but I don’t think you will be able to get enough tension for the wide blades to cut well. My store bought ones have arms that are about 1-1/2 in wide by a bit over 3/4 thick. It takes quite a bit of tension for those wide blades.

The tension that I do have on the blade seems sufficient as the saw cuts well – and straight. I am curious though to experience other saws tension first hand to compare.


-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1684 days


#14 posted 05-31-2012 06:20 AM

I have mine strung with Dyneema line. The low stretch stuff that they use for rigging on sailboats – 3.8 mm line with a breaking strength around 600lbs. When tightened, the blade is comparable to a backsaw on the shorter crosscut saw. I hardly get any deflection at all when sawing with it. My longer saw that I have a rip blade in, I don’t use as much tension. It is more comparable to a panel saw. I can make it deflect if I don’t saw straight.

Maybe I tighten them too much. I don’t have any real knowledge of what is “right” but when it is not tight, the saws don’t feel as good to cut with and don’t track as well.

To give some scale, here is the picture of one of mine I bought at Highland Woodworking, the blade is a bit over 1” wide.

For what it is worth, the blades I got over at Traditional Woodworker cut much better than the ones that I got with the saw. My smaller one came with a Japanese style blade tooth but I have taken it out in favor of a 9tpi crosscut blade.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2334 days


#15 posted 05-31-2012 01:21 PM

Thanks for the input. from your description I think I have it tightened enough, and the saw cuts well and does not wander but stays in a nice straight line and cuts fast.

I think the japanese blades makes the cuts easier (smaller and more teeth) but I just don’t care much for the idea of teeth breaking and having to replace the entire blade for it – that’s why I built this saw to replace my japanese saw. I wanted a blade I could resharpen when needed.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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