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Lumber #5: hurricane Irene effect

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Blog entry by PurpLev posted 1017 days ago 1223 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Urban Logging Starts Here Part 5 of Lumber series no next part

The town usually takes broken trees to be ground down but with the recent storm there just too many so they just dropped it at the transfer station and people have been able to cut it down for fire wood. Not all looks suitable for woodworking and the majority is just to ok big to handle without a proper machine but one can still dream

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.



13 comments so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15621 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 1017 days ago

I get a little ill every time I think about all the wood I could have salvaged after Katrina. Not only in terms of downed trees, but also in the mountains of water-damaged furniture, cabinets, etc. that were piled curbside during cleanup and rebuilding.

Alas, I was just too busy with my own damage to be concerned with digging through other people’s debris piles for future woodworking materials.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8475 posts in 2231 days


#2 posted 1017 days ago

I know what you mean Charlie, If it makes you feel any better – I didn’t pick up anything – just can’t handle it at the moment. I also had a maple tree fall on our rental a few years back. had to call the city which came the next day with chainsaws and took it down… I kept thinking of asking them to leave the material as is for me to mill it later, but at the time I did not have anything more than a circular saw so it wasn’t very practical – I still regret it though to this day although I know it was the right thing to do… probably what you talk about.

I think that in order to really recycle one needs a large space to store all the wood to be recycled unless it’s by project and in smaller quantities.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2336 days


#3 posted 1016 days ago

MY dad just cut down a Fig tree in his backyard. He kept a couple of 4 ft long by 4” diameter sections that I hope to run through the badsaw and then sticker…..

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View Lenny's profile

Lenny

1222 posts in 2109 days


#4 posted 1016 days ago

I hear you Sharon. The home I grew up in is still family property on the market for sale. Irene caused two large branches of a maple tree in the backyard to fall. They were low enough for me to handle the clean up. I decided to bring home 3 of the larger diameter “logs” I had cut. They were maybe 6” in diameter and 15-18 inches in length. I had never worked with green wood before so I did a little research and found a YouTube video on how to slice up a small log. Like sIKE, I ran them through my bandsaw. I sliced the logs in half and cut a small flat spot for each half-log to ride on. Then I screwed the half log to a right angle “sled” I made up and cut off slices about 1” thick. I applied anchorseal to the ends and stickered the pieces. Out of the 3 logs I got about 15 pieces. I don’t know what I will use it for but the lumber may one day make a few sentimental projects.

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8475 posts in 2231 days


#5 posted 1016 days ago

I agree with that Barry – the extra expenses that comes from trying to recycle ends up being far more expensive and labor intensive than sawing farmed/wild/wood lumber. just always painful to see all that material go to waste.

sIKE – I’d love to see what that fig tree looks like inside.

Lenny – there is an old hebrew saying “me’az yatza matok’ which roughly translates to “from within sour came sweet”. glad to see you were able to haul that lumber away and make use of it. any plans for it?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Gary's profile

Gary

6840 posts in 2015 days


#6 posted 1016 days ago

Things seem to change when the wood comes by way of problems or storms. I had a tornado take a huge oak down in my front pasture. It was 46” at the base where I cut it. After cutting that giant up, hauling it to the back by the barn, splitting loads of it for firewood, etc…. milling it just wasn’t in me. The next year, I did get some shorter pieces from some that I split. But that first year, no way

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View stratiA's profile

stratiA

100 posts in 1958 days


#7 posted 1016 days ago

hey there Sharon,
I’m only 5 minutes from you. Is the transfer station lumber available for everybody? I have looking around locally for small logs 6 to 10” to cut into bowl blanks. I’ve had several people actually turn me down for even a single log. Apparently several opportunistic people are making rounds picking up downed trees for winter firewood. Went apple picking today and the orchard had piles of cut apple firewood and even they wouldn’t sacrifice a single log. Did you notice any maple or ash.

-- Strati Alepidis, Burlington, Ma, Member Red Sox nation

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8475 posts in 2231 days


#8 posted 1016 days ago

Strati, the transfer station is only available for towns residents, and even then only with marked vehicles. you are more than welcome to join me, but like I said – all the logs are at least 2 feet in diameter and huge, people come in with chainsaws hammers and splitters to break it down for firewood – if you are ready for some work – come on by. no ash, and I don’t remember seeing maple, just some Oak and some weeping willows and other ornamental trees. pm me if you want to set anything up.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View stratiA's profile

stratiA

100 posts in 1958 days


#9 posted 1016 days ago

thanks anyway.
always seem to find plenty of oak and little else. I am always too busy to bother other people with my hectic schedule. I will probably drive up some back road somewhere one day and find something useable. My brothers buddy one day cut down a maple in his yard. We asked him to keep a section intact for us to possibly mill. He hacked it all up for firewood and tossed a couple small pieces our way. Would you know the whole tree was very highly figured, curly and a little bird’s eye to boot. My brother and I still lament our lost wood possibilities

-- Strati Alepidis, Burlington, Ma, Member Red Sox nation

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8475 posts in 2231 days


#10 posted 1015 days ago

well, thats restaurant business for ya.

I would go to your brothers buddy and loot all of his firewood – can still make small boxes and turn smaller items from it.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View stratiA's profile

stratiA

100 posts in 1958 days


#11 posted 1015 days ago

up in smoke

-- Strati Alepidis, Burlington, Ma, Member Red Sox nation

View Lenny's profile

Lenny

1222 posts in 2109 days


#12 posted 1015 days ago

Sharon, as I indicated, given its source, I will probably make something sentimental from the yield. After milling, the material will be quite small so I am thinking keepsake boxes or something along those lines.

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 1935 days


#13 posted 1014 days ago

Wow. I’d jump on that for firewood if it were around me. My high efficiency wood stove is how I heat my basement workshop during the winter. At the moment I’ve got over a full cord ready and waiting and five logs to cut and split and a number of 2’ diameter trunk pieces needing to be split so they can dry for next year. So far for all the years I’ve been doing this all this fuel has been free. Free heat. And on weekends when it hits single digit or below zero I fire up the wood burner in the basement of Friday and keep it stoked until Monday morning and my boiler hardly runs. Heat rises. Free energy. Rare these days…

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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