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Machinist Toolcart #5: Front Face Frames are On

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Blog entry by PurpLev posted 07-18-2011 03:33 AM 1677 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Gluing up the Carcass Part 5 of Machinist Toolcart series Part 6: Sneaking In the Back »

Another small step forward. I was able to mill some mahogany today for the face frames. I milled some 7/8”x1/2” strips from 1 long board that I was hoping would be enough for both front and back face frames but unfortunately it only yielded enough material for the front which is also all I had time today to manage.

So I joint a board with my #6 so that I can then rip it on the TS to long narrow strips 7/8” wide (to cover the 3/4” plywood with excess that I could then trim flush) and ~1/2” thick. I find that I am less inclined to use power tools lately – too much noise, dust everywhere, and the breaker keeps on popping (I live in a rental and only have 1 15Amp circuit I am running everything on, and it’s not really wired properly as far as I can tell). unless I need multiple identical parts I find that handplanes, hands saws, and chisels are much more enjoyable to use.

I cut a center groove in all the face frame parts to match those I made in the carcass to take a spline, and from some left overs I was also able to mill some spline material ~1/8” thick:

I cut the splines into 6” sections which helped with the next step which was cutting the exterior frame to size and mitering the corners. the splines helped hold the face frame parts in place so taking measurements and marking the parts was easier with both hands available for that purpose. this left with the cut parts ready to be glued after a dry fitting:

here you can see the splines in place, I later (prior to gluing) moved them closer to the corners to help align the miter joints better:

I am kinda taking this slow, so I figured I’ll do the frames in baby steps rather than preparing all parts and doing 1 glueup and so I glued up the exterior front face frames and then moved on to work on the dividers faces. I wanted to give the cabinet a clean look, and so the corner joints are all mitered, but I also wanted to give the cart a hint of the machinist toolbox I made which was heavy with dovetails to kinda tie them together. What I did was use dovetails to join the dividers in the face frame.

I cut the dividers to length (horizontal first, and after It was glued in and set I did the same for the vertical) keeping the length about 3/4” longer than the space it was holding for the joinery. I free cut the tails without really measuring the angles or anything. since there was just 1 tail on each side, I figured there is no need to try and keep them all the same. I place the divider at an angle and make a vertical cut that equates to an angle cut on the part. I find that if I place the part vertical and try to make an angled cut – it just doesn’t work (for me):

After cutting the tails, I sliced off half of each tail’s thickness. there is still enough material to ‘grab’ the joint, and the added step allows me to easily place the part over and register against the mating parts and trace the tail where the socket will be:

I then trace the tail, saw the side lines as much as possible, and chisel the rest:

Then it was glueup time – which wasn’t very fascinating, so I didn’t take a picture ;). That will have to wait until the next time – trimming time.

Slow going, but at least it’s going. it starting to look better than I had thought it would, which is a nice surprise.

Until next time,
Peace!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.



9 comments so far

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2427 posts in 2194 days


#1 posted 07-18-2011 04:05 AM

You are making some good progress. Thanks for taking the time to share it with us.

-- “That it will never come again / Is what makes life so sweet. ” ― Emily Dickinson

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3067 days


#2 posted 07-18-2011 04:08 AM

Sharon:

A great job. I picked up about40-50 BD FT of mahogany in the last week. This was scrap from my window and Door MFG.

He said some of it was Anigre Mahogany. I can’t find any reference to it on the web at least called mahogany. It seems to be have less pores in the wood, But I didn’t look very close. I just piled it up some pieces were 8-10” wide and 24-30” long. others were 2X2 30” long.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2315 days


#3 posted 07-18-2011 04:18 AM

Karson, you get the best lumber deals I could ever imagine!

I’m curious about what you said was Anigre mahogany. I used Curly Anigre veneer for the drawer fronts on this box:
Click for details

but wouldn’t think this was in the mahogany family. is the one you have reddish like other mahogany? or is it lighter in color? when I researched Anigre I was able to find some light info, but I don’t recall any reference to mahogany. curious…

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3067 days


#4 posted 07-18-2011 04:59 AM

No I’m not finding any reference to it being in the mahogany family either.

An interesting point is the references I see on the web say it’s like African mahogany, however Larry called it genuine mahogany which is one of the classes of South American mahogany. They call it genuine mahogany because the don’t keep track except that it’s from SA. and not Philippians Mahogany.

I’m going to go back and talk to him again and check the sample on his desk. It might have a different spelling and be another species.

I’m making some more parts for my Antique car for the Children out of Mahogany and Sapele again this year. Last years parts that were mahogany are now Sapele or Sipo or Utle. I’m also using some Teak for the radiator and trunk deck lid this year.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2315 days


#5 posted 07-18-2011 02:51 PM

looking forward to seeing those antiques! how many are you making this year?

would also be curious to hear what Larry has to say about Anigre.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3067 days


#6 posted 07-18-2011 03:24 PM

I’ve got over 150 started 160 bases, but 210 trunks, fenders ?, seats 180. gas tanks 175. They were made out of 1” square mahogany and then rounded over on the router table. I use a bull-nose bit to round them.

When I start cutting parts i usually finish the board that I’ve selected and it sometimes leads to overage on some parts.

On the frames I only had 145 (Some were short and were counted as good so I had to cut another 18.

I do a lot of resawing on my bandsaw for these parts because I need 1/2” thick 3 X 8.5 and 3/4” 3 X 10 so I may start out with 2” thick stock where I can get 2 – 3/4” pieces or 1 1/2” thick where I get 1 3/4” and 1 1/2” piece

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View moonls's profile

moonls

407 posts in 1653 days


#7 posted 07-18-2011 03:47 PM

Your slow & steady pace combined with your skill with hand tools is a sign of real craftsmanship! I’m sure you’ll be taken for a North Bennet St. School grad before long! And I can’t wait to see the finished product.

-- Lorna, Cape Cod

View Cory's profile

Cory

723 posts in 2086 days


#8 posted 07-18-2011 07:58 PM

I love the dovetail detail, Sharon. Keep up the good work and the updates!

-- The secret to getting ahead is getting started.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2315 days


#9 posted 07-18-2011 08:11 PM

thanks guys!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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